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Jim Budde
03-02-2004, 03:43 PM
A friend approached me a few days ago about wood needs (planking material) for an upcoming boat I want to build. Seems he has a few old telephone and electric poles which he believes to be straight grained relatively knot free white cedar. He also has a portable saw mill and would be willing to cut them into rough dimensional lumber for me. Any thoughts?

Jim Budde
03-02-2004, 03:43 PM
A friend approached me a few days ago about wood needs (planking material) for an upcoming boat I want to build. Seems he has a few old telephone and electric poles which he believes to be straight grained relatively knot free white cedar. He also has a portable saw mill and would be willing to cut them into rough dimensional lumber for me. Any thoughts?

Jim Budde
03-02-2004, 03:43 PM
A friend approached me a few days ago about wood needs (planking material) for an upcoming boat I want to build. Seems he has a few old telephone and electric poles which he believes to be straight grained relatively knot free white cedar. He also has a portable saw mill and would be willing to cut them into rough dimensional lumber for me. Any thoughts?

windfall
03-02-2004, 04:49 PM
If they have not been treated with creosote, and he's willing to risk his blades great. Clean them up as best you can and have at it. Recycled wood can sometimes be a bit more brittle, but it can be great stuff.

windfall
03-02-2004, 04:49 PM
If they have not been treated with creosote, and he's willing to risk his blades great. Clean them up as best you can and have at it. Recycled wood can sometimes be a bit more brittle, but it can be great stuff.

windfall
03-02-2004, 04:49 PM
If they have not been treated with creosote, and he's willing to risk his blades great. Clean them up as best you can and have at it. Recycled wood can sometimes be a bit more brittle, but it can be great stuff.

Bob Smalser
03-02-2004, 09:01 PM
I doubt they are cedar.

I can't think of any cedar that grows in clear pole-size boles. What inexpensive softwoods that take preservative well grow closest to home? Some sort of pine, I bet.

But I'd probably mill you some test boards if you paid for the blade repairs because of hardware. I'd wear a respirator, too.

Bob Smalser
03-02-2004, 09:01 PM
I doubt they are cedar.

I can't think of any cedar that grows in clear pole-size boles. What inexpensive softwoods that take preservative well grow closest to home? Some sort of pine, I bet.

But I'd probably mill you some test boards if you paid for the blade repairs because of hardware. I'd wear a respirator, too.

Bob Smalser
03-02-2004, 09:01 PM
I doubt they are cedar.

I can't think of any cedar that grows in clear pole-size boles. What inexpensive softwoods that take preservative well grow closest to home? Some sort of pine, I bet.

But I'd probably mill you some test boards if you paid for the blade repairs because of hardware. I'd wear a respirator, too.

Peter Malcolm Jardine
03-02-2004, 09:15 PM
Up here we use spruce for telephone poles, and it's knotty as a polka dot table cloth since they use the whole tree. They used to creosote them but now they're pressure treated. They pick em for uniform diameter and length.

Peter Malcolm Jardine
03-02-2004, 09:15 PM
Up here we use spruce for telephone poles, and it's knotty as a polka dot table cloth since they use the whole tree. They used to creosote them but now they're pressure treated. They pick em for uniform diameter and length.

Peter Malcolm Jardine
03-02-2004, 09:15 PM
Up here we use spruce for telephone poles, and it's knotty as a polka dot table cloth since they use the whole tree. They used to creosote them but now they're pressure treated. They pick em for uniform diameter and length.

Ed Harrow
03-02-2004, 10:38 PM
I used one to replace a barn sill once. Won't do that again. ;)

Based on that one experience I can't imagine there a telephone pole in the world made of something suitable for boat planking. However, if he's doing it for the fun of it, you'll have something to talk about. On the otherhand, if he's looking for your money you might note that they're a wee bit nastily filled with nasty stuff, and let it go at that.

Ed Harrow
03-02-2004, 10:38 PM
I used one to replace a barn sill once. Won't do that again. ;)

Based on that one experience I can't imagine there a telephone pole in the world made of something suitable for boat planking. However, if he's doing it for the fun of it, you'll have something to talk about. On the otherhand, if he's looking for your money you might note that they're a wee bit nastily filled with nasty stuff, and let it go at that.

Ed Harrow
03-02-2004, 10:38 PM
I used one to replace a barn sill once. Won't do that again. ;)

Based on that one experience I can't imagine there a telephone pole in the world made of something suitable for boat planking. However, if he's doing it for the fun of it, you'll have something to talk about. On the otherhand, if he's looking for your money you might note that they're a wee bit nastily filled with nasty stuff, and let it go at that.

Ron Williamson
03-03-2004, 05:59 AM
The poles that I cut were WR cedar and Doug-fir.Only the inground part had been treated and they were knottier than they appeared.They were badly checked as well.
R

Ron Williamson
03-03-2004, 05:59 AM
The poles that I cut were WR cedar and Doug-fir.Only the inground part had been treated and they were knottier than they appeared.They were badly checked as well.
R

Ron Williamson
03-03-2004, 05:59 AM
The poles that I cut were WR cedar and Doug-fir.Only the inground part had been treated and they were knottier than they appeared.They were badly checked as well.
R

Mrleft8
03-03-2004, 08:04 AM
Around here, utillity poles USED to be white oak. I'm talking a LONG LONG time ago. You could still find them along the RR tracks until they put the new high speed rails in. Now poles are P/T SYP.

Mrleft8
03-03-2004, 08:04 AM
Around here, utillity poles USED to be white oak. I'm talking a LONG LONG time ago. You could still find them along the RR tracks until they put the new high speed rails in. Now poles are P/T SYP.

Mrleft8
03-03-2004, 08:04 AM
Around here, utillity poles USED to be white oak. I'm talking a LONG LONG time ago. You could still find them along the RR tracks until they put the new high speed rails in. Now poles are P/T SYP.

Ken Hutchins
03-03-2004, 09:07 AM
I have a friend who works for an outfit that installs poles, so I've gotten first hand knowledge that some poles are cedar, occasionally they use the cedar where concerns for the environment require no chemical treatment, hence the cedar and some of the creosoted poles are cedar also. A source for cedar poles new would be the distributors who supply the poles to the installers, usually they do the pressure treating, get the poles before treating.

Ken Hutchins
03-03-2004, 09:07 AM
I have a friend who works for an outfit that installs poles, so I've gotten first hand knowledge that some poles are cedar, occasionally they use the cedar where concerns for the environment require no chemical treatment, hence the cedar and some of the creosoted poles are cedar also. A source for cedar poles new would be the distributors who supply the poles to the installers, usually they do the pressure treating, get the poles before treating.

Ken Hutchins
03-03-2004, 09:07 AM
I have a friend who works for an outfit that installs poles, so I've gotten first hand knowledge that some poles are cedar, occasionally they use the cedar where concerns for the environment require no chemical treatment, hence the cedar and some of the creosoted poles are cedar also. A source for cedar poles new would be the distributors who supply the poles to the installers, usually they do the pressure treating, get the poles before treating.

Jim Budde
03-03-2004, 09:11 AM
Thanks, folks. Talked to friend again and he is willing to cut one to size, so we will see what he has. Also, I was wrong about origin .... most are from old railroad right of ways .... 50+ years old.

Jim Budde
03-03-2004, 09:11 AM
Thanks, folks. Talked to friend again and he is willing to cut one to size, so we will see what he has. Also, I was wrong about origin .... most are from old railroad right of ways .... 50+ years old.

Jim Budde
03-03-2004, 09:11 AM
Thanks, folks. Talked to friend again and he is willing to cut one to size, so we will see what he has. Also, I was wrong about origin .... most are from old railroad right of ways .... 50+ years old.

gary porter
03-03-2004, 02:23 PM
Jim, what type of boat are you planning to build?
Old poles?? most have been treated with creosote which might not be that desireable on your boat. Also, if it were my mill I'd sure scan those poles for metal before wasting a blade. Its going to be hard wood on the saw in any case I'm thinking but perhaps worth it. Can't imagine that they used all that good of tree for the pole.
Good luck
Gary

gary porter
03-03-2004, 02:23 PM
Jim, what type of boat are you planning to build?
Old poles?? most have been treated with creosote which might not be that desireable on your boat. Also, if it were my mill I'd sure scan those poles for metal before wasting a blade. Its going to be hard wood on the saw in any case I'm thinking but perhaps worth it. Can't imagine that they used all that good of tree for the pole.
Good luck
Gary

gary porter
03-03-2004, 02:23 PM
Jim, what type of boat are you planning to build?
Old poles?? most have been treated with creosote which might not be that desireable on your boat. Also, if it were my mill I'd sure scan those poles for metal before wasting a blade. Its going to be hard wood on the saw in any case I'm thinking but perhaps worth it. Can't imagine that they used all that good of tree for the pole.
Good luck
Gary

Nicholas Carey
03-03-2004, 02:30 PM
Wood from old telephone/telegraph poles is also likely to be completely cooked from the sun. Highly weathered—a whole lot of UV-induced delignification.

Nicholas Carey
03-03-2004, 02:30 PM
Wood from old telephone/telegraph poles is also likely to be completely cooked from the sun. Highly weathered—a whole lot of UV-induced delignification.

Nicholas Carey
03-03-2004, 02:30 PM
Wood from old telephone/telegraph poles is also likely to be completely cooked from the sun. Highly weathered—a whole lot of UV-induced delignification.

Bob Smalser
03-03-2004, 03:19 PM
Careful trusting metal detectors....the large commercial mills use spendy ones that reach deep. I haven't found an affordable one that reaches more than 3 inches into the log while the blade reaches 8" or more.

WB 175 has a piece by Jagels on reclaimed timbers. The UV degrade doesn't penetrate very deep. But there will be a lot of checking in there outwards from the pith that will dramatically reduce the BF you recover. I'd be more concerned how deep the creosote has penetrated....we no longer manufacture it for a good reason.

[ 03-03-2004, 03:21 PM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Bob Smalser
03-03-2004, 03:19 PM
Careful trusting metal detectors....the large commercial mills use spendy ones that reach deep. I haven't found an affordable one that reaches more than 3 inches into the log while the blade reaches 8" or more.

WB 175 has a piece by Jagels on reclaimed timbers. The UV degrade doesn't penetrate very deep. But there will be a lot of checking in there outwards from the pith that will dramatically reduce the BF you recover. I'd be more concerned how deep the creosote has penetrated....we no longer manufacture it for a good reason.

[ 03-03-2004, 03:21 PM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Bob Smalser
03-03-2004, 03:19 PM
Careful trusting metal detectors....the large commercial mills use spendy ones that reach deep. I haven't found an affordable one that reaches more than 3 inches into the log while the blade reaches 8" or more.

WB 175 has a piece by Jagels on reclaimed timbers. The UV degrade doesn't penetrate very deep. But there will be a lot of checking in there outwards from the pith that will dramatically reduce the BF you recover. I'd be more concerned how deep the creosote has penetrated....we no longer manufacture it for a good reason.

[ 03-03-2004, 03:21 PM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Andreas Jordahl Rhude
03-04-2004, 08:23 AM
There is a pressure preservative treating outfit near Minneapolis that treats western cedar poles for use in utilities. These are pretty big poles that they obtain from Canada. I don't know if they are western red cedar or some other type of cedar. They treat with pentacholophenol in heavy oil.

Andreas Jordahl Rhude
03-04-2004, 08:23 AM
There is a pressure preservative treating outfit near Minneapolis that treats western cedar poles for use in utilities. These are pretty big poles that they obtain from Canada. I don't know if they are western red cedar or some other type of cedar. They treat with pentacholophenol in heavy oil.

Andreas Jordahl Rhude
03-04-2004, 08:23 AM
There is a pressure preservative treating outfit near Minneapolis that treats western cedar poles for use in utilities. These are pretty big poles that they obtain from Canada. I don't know if they are western red cedar or some other type of cedar. They treat with pentacholophenol in heavy oil.

Thad Van Gilder
03-04-2004, 08:33 AM
I have seen old telephone poles in south Jersey that are cedar. Cedar trees used to grow pretty big down there in the swamps...

-Thad

Thad Van Gilder
03-04-2004, 08:33 AM
I have seen old telephone poles in south Jersey that are cedar. Cedar trees used to grow pretty big down there in the swamps...

-Thad

Thad Van Gilder
03-04-2004, 08:33 AM
I have seen old telephone poles in south Jersey that are cedar. Cedar trees used to grow pretty big down there in the swamps...

-Thad

Jim Budde
03-05-2004, 06:10 PM
Well .. sometimes my desire to recylce old things doesn't work out as planned. The poles are indeed cedar and they are straight and, for the most part, free of any preservatives. Unfortunately the rough cut samples have enough knots to preclude use as planking for a traditional plank on frame sailboat. Thanks for all the comments

Jim Budde
03-05-2004, 06:10 PM
Well .. sometimes my desire to recylce old things doesn't work out as planned. The poles are indeed cedar and they are straight and, for the most part, free of any preservatives. Unfortunately the rough cut samples have enough knots to preclude use as planking for a traditional plank on frame sailboat. Thanks for all the comments

Jim Budde
03-05-2004, 06:10 PM
Well .. sometimes my desire to recylce old things doesn't work out as planned. The poles are indeed cedar and they are straight and, for the most part, free of any preservatives. Unfortunately the rough cut samples have enough knots to preclude use as planking for a traditional plank on frame sailboat. Thanks for all the comments