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Reynard38
12-11-2015, 11:16 AM
Going to see it this afternoon. Will report afterwards.

Ian McColgin
12-11-2015, 11:19 AM
Waiting your review. I think it will be fun despite the criticisms linked in http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?200372-Call-me-Fishmeal

Gerarddm
12-11-2015, 12:49 PM
Yeh, the conceit of whale as serial killer is a bit much. But a gripping story in reality.

bamamick
12-11-2015, 01:24 PM
Might be something good to do Sunday afternoon.

Mickey Lake

John of Phoenix
12-11-2015, 01:33 PM
"Ron Howard - Director"

He's done some very good movies in the past.

skuthorp
12-11-2015, 03:11 PM
Seems to have been universally ridiculed here.

GregH
12-11-2015, 04:54 PM
Seems to have been universally ridiculed here.

The movie, book, or the actual facts???

Reynard38
12-11-2015, 06:46 PM
All 3 of us really enjoyed it. It's from a different perspective than I had imagined.
I think it would have really been a tough job being a whaler, no thanks. I guess fossile fuels are good for something.

skuthorp
12-11-2015, 08:47 PM
The film GregH.

SullivanB
12-11-2015, 09:03 PM
All 3 of us really enjoyed it. It's from a different perspective than I had imagined.
I think it would have really been a tough job being a whaler, no thanks. I guess fossile fuels are good for something.

I'm about to finish Richard Dana's Two Years Before the Mast and he's convinced me that serving on just about any deep water sailing vessel back then would have been tough duty. But an old hand whom Dana was describing was saying he'd sailed on just about every kind of vessel, including slavers, and bothered to mention that the one kind of vessel he was quite pleased to have avoided was the whaler. Thanks. I'll see the movie.

Jim Bow
12-11-2015, 09:36 PM
Serial killer????? In the book, which was well researched, the whale hit the ship and was gone. Huge accident. Am I remembering incorrectly??

Gerarddm
12-11-2015, 09:37 PM
No, you are correct, but in the film the whale evidently stalks the boats after the ship is sunk. Ridiculous.

Jim Bow
12-11-2015, 09:45 PM
In 1820, the average American male was 5'5 and weighed 115 to 130 lbs. They certainly did not resemble Thor.

bamamick
12-12-2015, 10:02 AM
I'm about to finish Richard Dana's Two Years Before the Mast and he's convinced me that serving on just about any deep water sailing vessel back then would have been tough duty. But an old hand whom Dana was describing was saying he'd sailed on just about every kind of vessel, including slavers, and bothered to mention that the one kind of vessel he was quite pleased to have avoided was the whaler. Thanks. I'll see the movie.

If you want to know how tough those oldfellas were, just look at their hands in the photographs. Incredibly tough old guys.

Mickey Lake

SullivanB
12-12-2015, 10:48 AM
If you want to know how tough those oldfellas were, just look at their hands in the photographs. Incredibly tough old guys.

Mickey Lake

What, you mean the owners didn't furnish the crew with hand cream and leather gloves of the highest quality?BY:D

Ian McColgin
12-12-2015, 10:57 AM
I was raised with the belief that people in the Mayflower era and on for some centuries were just plain shorter and that's why the decks of ships had so little headroom. Turns out that was not true at all. They just had little headroom for better construction and weight distribution.

There are different source for average American men's height but the best I could find puts the average at about 5'8" in the 1820s.

Gerarddm
12-12-2015, 03:07 PM
Even into the 20th Century. Both Beatty and Jellicoe were little guys. I believe neither was taller than 5'-8".

bamamick
12-13-2015, 06:12 PM
I saw it today. It certainly wasn't boring. I guess there are a few spoilers down below if you don't want to know what happens:

I really liked the first bits, which looked very realistic on the scale or surpassing 'Master and Commander', but sailing into a squall with all of his sails up? Really? The rest, the added bits about the whale stalking them I suppose Mr. Howard felt were necessary, but I am not sure why. The guys adrift in the boats the way they were was plenty horrific enough without him having to add a 'monster' to the scenes.

I really liked that boat he was sailing at the end. Anyone know if that was true to the period? Looked a little more modern than the early to mid-1800's.

Mickey Lake