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P.I. Stazzer-Newt
11-13-2015, 12:56 AM
This month marks ten years for me - it was tough to begin with but got - gradually - easier.

The only real regret was having started in the first place.

How are the rest of you lot getting on?

Ian McColgin
11-13-2015, 06:36 AM
I smoked my pipes for twenty-five years before quitting 14 years ago in deference to Mary Ellen's asthma. And by the way, a pipe is a terrific nicotine delivery system as the capillaries in the mouth take it right in, no need for lung absorption. I suffered no bad health effects from quitting.

The Bigfella
11-13-2015, 06:47 AM
I quit about 40 years ago

Jim Bow
11-13-2015, 11:15 AM
Quit in 1989.
I do smoke a 1 a month cigar when the weather is nice.

wizbang 13
11-13-2015, 01:20 PM
I am about to start up again when I get to the islands !! Six month break is about over.
Really looking forward to hanging with cool European smokers IN a bar!!

birlinn
11-13-2015, 01:25 PM
I am about to start up again when I get to the islands !! Six month break is about over.
Really looking forward to hanging with cool European smokers IN a bar!!
Better choose your country carefully, then.

Rob Hazard
11-13-2015, 01:30 PM
August, 1972.

Breakaway
11-13-2015, 01:41 PM
July 4 2013 --"Independence Day!"--for me. Had a twinge of an urge to fire one up the other day, but it passed in about two minutes.

Kevin

bob winter
11-13-2015, 01:48 PM
Stopped summer of 2013 - don't miss it.

John Meachen
11-13-2015, 04:48 PM
Congratulations to those of you who have managed to leave the habit behind.I'm glad I never saw the appeal of starting.

beernd
11-14-2015, 05:35 AM
Friday January 13th 2012, almost three years.
Still convinced that if I light up 1 cigaret I will fall for it again.
I guess one stays a tobacco junky for the rest of your life.

lupussonic
11-14-2015, 06:46 AM
Been on a Vape gadget for a year now. Love it, although it's the lesser of 2 evils and I need to quit totally. Great to smoke in bed alongside her.

I quit for 5 years once, started again having won all three dinghy races in a regatta in Cornwall. People were buying me drinks and slapping me on the back. I thought I would treat myself to a victory cigar. Then another. Then as the beer flowed, bought some tobacco, woke up the next morning with a bastard behing the eyes, and a pocket full of tobacco.

To quit properly, for me, I need to go running and swimming every day, get those natural endorphins going and oxygenate my blood for about 6 weeks otherwise I go insane and can't do anything useful. It's a full on discipline, or it will fail.

I just don't have the time for the foreseeable so I'm sticking with the Vapor.

Jim Mahan
11-14-2015, 09:32 AM
Mr. Stazzer-Newt seems to have a knack for coming up with what would be excellent names for characters in a novel. Except maybe should be Dr. Stazzer-Newt.

I spent my first night in this domicile thirteen years ago on July 3 after having my last cigarette of thirty years of smoking tobacco. Independence day had never been so appropriately named, for me.

For those trying, one, it really was the most difficult thing I've managed to accomplish, ever. And, two, it was too late. I should never have started, but the odds were stacked against me; my old man bought a pipe and tobacco store franchise, The TinderBox, in San Francisco, when I was sixteen, and I enlisted in the military a year or so later.

The thing is, even though I quit thirteen years ago, smoking pipes and cigars and cigarettes for thirty-five years has had it's impact, and I have a, so far, mild case of emphysema. Significantly less fun, glamorous, in, continental, salty and yar, etc, than smoking.

The best news is that, no matter how hard you have found it so far to quit, every time you try makes it more likely that you will eventually succeed. That idea helped me get to where I could manage it.

And yes, if you have been addicted to tobacco, unless you are from the planet Krypton, you are a tobacco junky for life and one, ONE cigarette, or cigar or wonderful afternoon with a pipe, will suck you right back down the brown swirling drain of death.

(Of course whether you've been a smoker or not, you're still heading down the same path eventually anyway. Maybe just a little less brown.)

But go for the gusto! Enjoy. There's no denying the appeal, the allure etc, but that way is best done with a Hemingwayesque exit; you really don't want to die of lung cancer. And you really don't want to go through your last years not being able to draw an easy breath without an albuterol inhaler.

Don't let it take thirty years to quit.

And there is no form of nicotine that is safe. If you spend your time on the job-site with just a pinch between your cheek and gum, you stand a very good chance of spending your latter days with the good half of your face excised. Don't do that either.

Hearty congratulations to those of us who have made it to tobacco free. We oughta have a national day to celebrate and be inspirational to all those cool young dopes who are doing just what we did.

George Jung
11-14-2015, 10:01 AM
Mr. Stazzer-Newt seems to have a knack for coming up with what would be excellent names for characters in a novel. Except maybe should be Dr. Stazzer-Newt.

I spent my first night in this domicile thirteen years ago on July 3 after having my last cigarette of thirty years of smoking tobacco. Independence day had never been so appropriately named, for me.

For those trying, one, it really was the most difficult thing I've managed to accomplish, ever. And, two, it was too late. I should never have started, but the odds were stacked against me; my old man bought a pipe and tobacco store franchise, The TinderBox, in San Francisco, when I was sixteen, and I enlisted in the military a year or so later.

The thing is, even though I quit thirteen years ago, smoking pipes and cigars and cigarettes for thirty-five years has had it's impact, and I have a, so far, mild case of emphysema. Significantly less fun, glamorous, in, continental, salty and yar, etc, than smoking.

The best news is that, no matter how hard you have found it so far to quit, every time you try makes it more likely that you will eventually succeed. That idea helped me get to where I could manage it.

And yes, if you have been addicted to tobacco, unless you are from the planet Krypton, you are a tobacco junky for life and one, ONE cigarette, or cigar or wonderful afternoon with a pipe, will suck you right back down the brown swirling drain of death.

(Of course whether you've been a smoker or not, you're still heading down the same path eventually anyway. Maybe just a little less brown.)

But go for the gusto! Enjoy. There's no denying the appeal, the allure etc, but that way is best done with a Hemingwayesque exit; you really don't want to die of lung cancer. And you really don't want to go through your last years not being able to draw an easy breath without an albuterol inhaler.

Don't let it take thirty years to quit.

And there is no form of nicotine that is safe. If you spend your time on the job-site with just a pinch between your cheek and gum, you stand a very good chance of spending your latter days with the good half of your face excised. Don't do that either.

Hearty congratulations to those of us who have made it to tobacco free. We oughta have a national day to celebrate and be inspirational to all those cool young dopes who are doing just what we did.

If ever you cross a 'poster contest' for quitting tobacco - please enter. This is a good one.

I've never 'first hand' smoked - but my folks did, and so 1) I've hated it, lifelong, and so was never remotely tempted to even try - Thanks, Obama! and 2) I've a touch of emphysema and asthma, from my second-hand exposure. *sigh*

Part of my day job entails encouraging folks to kick the habit. It's a bastard - 'more addictive than heroin or crack cocaine'. You'd think that'd be cause for pause, for those trying to kick it, enjoying it, or contemplating starting - but as a 'socially acceptable drug', it's not.

Always enjoy the rehash of this topic, for the gleanings I might employ in counseling.