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Concordia41
03-25-2001, 01:33 PM
Included with a two-part product I purchased were two sizes of wax measuring cups. The small ones say "medicine cup" and the large ones say "Barium dispenser cup" (UGH!)

On the cup bottom it says "Sweetheart Chicago, IL"

They're a lot studier than paper cups and I'm guessing a lot more economical than plastic.

Has anyone seen these in a catalog?

Concordia41
03-25-2001, 01:33 PM
Included with a two-part product I purchased were two sizes of wax measuring cups. The small ones say "medicine cup" and the large ones say "Barium dispenser cup" (UGH!)

On the cup bottom it says "Sweetheart Chicago, IL"

They're a lot studier than paper cups and I'm guessing a lot more economical than plastic.

Has anyone seen these in a catalog?

Concordia41
03-25-2001, 01:33 PM
Included with a two-part product I purchased were two sizes of wax measuring cups. The small ones say "medicine cup" and the large ones say "Barium dispenser cup" (UGH!)

On the cup bottom it says "Sweetheart Chicago, IL"

They're a lot studier than paper cups and I'm guessing a lot more economical than plastic.

Has anyone seen these in a catalog?

paladin
03-25-2001, 03:09 PM
Those cups (straws and other paper products) are available from numerous sources such as supply houses for the soft drink industry, hospital supplies etc. I have seen them bulk in Office Depot and other companies that specialize in office supplies.

paladin
03-25-2001, 03:09 PM
Those cups (straws and other paper products) are available from numerous sources such as supply houses for the soft drink industry, hospital supplies etc. I have seen them bulk in Office Depot and other companies that specialize in office supplies.

paladin
03-25-2001, 03:09 PM
Those cups (straws and other paper products) are available from numerous sources such as supply houses for the soft drink industry, hospital supplies etc. I have seen them bulk in Office Depot and other companies that specialize in office supplies.

thechemist
03-25-2001, 05:43 PM
Do NOT use wax-lined measuring cups for solvent-borne paints, epoxy or whatever.

The wax dissolves to a degree [usually a disastrous degree] in the product, you apply that mixed or measured product, and then things do not stick to things. It's the WAX. Whey your stuff dries, cures, whatever, a film of wax comes to the surface.

This technology is used in polyester resins. You may have heard of [well, read about it in a book, anyway...no one around here does that sort of thing, at least not since they grew up and learned the difference between RIGHT and WRONG] Laminating resin and Finishing resin? Well, the oxygen in the air prevents polyester resin from curing on the surface. That's the laminating resin. Another lamination sticks just fine to that, absent contamination or gremlins. In order to make the final layup, or gel-coat or whatever cure without a sticky surface, they dissolve a percent or two of molten paraffin wax in the hot resin. The wax film forms on the surface as the stuff cures, and there's your non-tacky surface

Of course, nothing sticks unless you sand it. There's your paraffin wax.

thechemist
03-25-2001, 05:43 PM
Do NOT use wax-lined measuring cups for solvent-borne paints, epoxy or whatever.

The wax dissolves to a degree [usually a disastrous degree] in the product, you apply that mixed or measured product, and then things do not stick to things. It's the WAX. Whey your stuff dries, cures, whatever, a film of wax comes to the surface.

This technology is used in polyester resins. You may have heard of [well, read about it in a book, anyway...no one around here does that sort of thing, at least not since they grew up and learned the difference between RIGHT and WRONG] Laminating resin and Finishing resin? Well, the oxygen in the air prevents polyester resin from curing on the surface. That's the laminating resin. Another lamination sticks just fine to that, absent contamination or gremlins. In order to make the final layup, or gel-coat or whatever cure without a sticky surface, they dissolve a percent or two of molten paraffin wax in the hot resin. The wax film forms on the surface as the stuff cures, and there's your non-tacky surface

Of course, nothing sticks unless you sand it. There's your paraffin wax.

thechemist
03-25-2001, 05:43 PM
Do NOT use wax-lined measuring cups for solvent-borne paints, epoxy or whatever.

The wax dissolves to a degree [usually a disastrous degree] in the product, you apply that mixed or measured product, and then things do not stick to things. It's the WAX. Whey your stuff dries, cures, whatever, a film of wax comes to the surface.

This technology is used in polyester resins. You may have heard of [well, read about it in a book, anyway...no one around here does that sort of thing, at least not since they grew up and learned the difference between RIGHT and WRONG] Laminating resin and Finishing resin? Well, the oxygen in the air prevents polyester resin from curing on the surface. That's the laminating resin. Another lamination sticks just fine to that, absent contamination or gremlins. In order to make the final layup, or gel-coat or whatever cure without a sticky surface, they dissolve a percent or two of molten paraffin wax in the hot resin. The wax film forms on the surface as the stuff cures, and there's your non-tacky surface

Of course, nothing sticks unless you sand it. There's your paraffin wax.

Art Read
03-26-2001, 10:36 AM
Chemist... When I realised, (too late) that I'd run out of the paper cups that came with my googe, I grabbed an empty soda can, cut the top off and washed it out good. Seemed to work fine, but it was just a quick, little job. Any "nasties" in the coatings they use in manufacture that would make this unadvisable?

Art Read
03-26-2001, 10:36 AM
Chemist... When I realised, (too late) that I'd run out of the paper cups that came with my googe, I grabbed an empty soda can, cut the top off and washed it out good. Seemed to work fine, but it was just a quick, little job. Any "nasties" in the coatings they use in manufacture that would make this unadvisable?

Art Read
03-26-2001, 10:36 AM
Chemist... When I realised, (too late) that I'd run out of the paper cups that came with my googe, I grabbed an empty soda can, cut the top off and washed it out good. Seemed to work fine, but it was just a quick, little job. Any "nasties" in the coatings they use in manufacture that would make this unadvisable?

Ross Faneuf
03-26-2001, 10:55 AM
I know the cups you mean, and I've avoided them.

I almost never rely on graduations on cups to measure epoxy. I have used graduations a few times on large batches (say 2-3 quarts) and then used the graduated plastic paint cups available everywhere.

For small batches, I use a pump (accuracy periodically checked with a scale) and plastic cups from the supermarket or paint cups. I use everything from 4 oz. cups to 20 oz cups, plus 1 qt. paint cups. Plastic supermarket cups are inert with respect to epoxy (but NOT to many solvents, be warned), and have no surface contamination that I can detect; I bet most products sold for drinks don't.

[This message has been edited by Ross Faneuf (edited 03-26-2001).]

Ross Faneuf
03-26-2001, 10:55 AM
I know the cups you mean, and I've avoided them.

I almost never rely on graduations on cups to measure epoxy. I have used graduations a few times on large batches (say 2-3 quarts) and then used the graduated plastic paint cups available everywhere.

For small batches, I use a pump (accuracy periodically checked with a scale) and plastic cups from the supermarket or paint cups. I use everything from 4 oz. cups to 20 oz cups, plus 1 qt. paint cups. Plastic supermarket cups are inert with respect to epoxy (but NOT to many solvents, be warned), and have no surface contamination that I can detect; I bet most products sold for drinks don't.

[This message has been edited by Ross Faneuf (edited 03-26-2001).]

Ross Faneuf
03-26-2001, 10:55 AM
I know the cups you mean, and I've avoided them.

I almost never rely on graduations on cups to measure epoxy. I have used graduations a few times on large batches (say 2-3 quarts) and then used the graduated plastic paint cups available everywhere.

For small batches, I use a pump (accuracy periodically checked with a scale) and plastic cups from the supermarket or paint cups. I use everything from 4 oz. cups to 20 oz cups, plus 1 qt. paint cups. Plastic supermarket cups are inert with respect to epoxy (but NOT to many solvents, be warned), and have no surface contamination that I can detect; I bet most products sold for drinks don't.

[This message has been edited by Ross Faneuf (edited 03-26-2001).]

thechemist
03-26-2001, 02:43 PM
Empty soda can will work fine, but you need to deal with the cut edge; sharp as a razor, will cut you as efficiently as the finest Damascus steel blade.

thechemist
03-26-2001, 02:43 PM
Empty soda can will work fine, but you need to deal with the cut edge; sharp as a razor, will cut you as efficiently as the finest Damascus steel blade.

thechemist
03-26-2001, 02:43 PM
Empty soda can will work fine, but you need to deal with the cut edge; sharp as a razor, will cut you as efficiently as the finest Damascus steel blade.

Jim H
03-26-2001, 05:19 PM
When ordering Chinese take-out, I often get an order of wonton soup, the plastic container they use is perfect for paint, epoxy etc., just needs to be well washed.

Jim

Jim H
03-26-2001, 05:19 PM
When ordering Chinese take-out, I often get an order of wonton soup, the plastic container they use is perfect for paint, epoxy etc., just needs to be well washed.

Jim

Jim H
03-26-2001, 05:19 PM
When ordering Chinese take-out, I often get an order of wonton soup, the plastic container they use is perfect for paint, epoxy etc., just needs to be well washed.

Jim

NormMessinger
03-26-2001, 05:33 PM
Yogart cups if they open in the big end are good as are cottage cheese containers for big batches.

When I started using System Three googue I ordered their mixing cups. The suckers were wax coated. Waxed cups were an absolute no no when I was building N24PN so I called Kern. No problem with System Three was the answer.

--Norm

NormMessinger
03-26-2001, 05:33 PM
Yogart cups if they open in the big end are good as are cottage cheese containers for big batches.

When I started using System Three googue I ordered their mixing cups. The suckers were wax coated. Waxed cups were an absolute no no when I was building N24PN so I called Kern. No problem with System Three was the answer.

--Norm

NormMessinger
03-26-2001, 05:33 PM
Yogart cups if they open in the big end are good as are cottage cheese containers for big batches.

When I started using System Three googue I ordered their mixing cups. The suckers were wax coated. Waxed cups were an absolute no no when I was building N24PN so I called Kern. No problem with System Three was the answer.

--Norm

Bob Cleek
03-27-2001, 11:48 PM
Get yourself a flat pan... even a pie plate will do. Line it with heavy duty tin foil and mix your googe in that. When you are done, just pull out the tinfoil and toss it. Better to mix in flat pans since the stuff is spread out and you can control the exothermic reaction (is that what they call it) The more the mass of the stuff, the hotter it gets, anyway. Put it in the freezer when you aren't using it. I've gotten a week's worth of work off a batch doing that... but I wouldn't try that if I was really worried about the integrity of the reaction. Just for slop jobs... epoxy is FUN!

Bob Cleek
03-27-2001, 11:48 PM
Get yourself a flat pan... even a pie plate will do. Line it with heavy duty tin foil and mix your googe in that. When you are done, just pull out the tinfoil and toss it. Better to mix in flat pans since the stuff is spread out and you can control the exothermic reaction (is that what they call it) The more the mass of the stuff, the hotter it gets, anyway. Put it in the freezer when you aren't using it. I've gotten a week's worth of work off a batch doing that... but I wouldn't try that if I was really worried about the integrity of the reaction. Just for slop jobs... epoxy is FUN!

Bob Cleek
03-27-2001, 11:48 PM
Get yourself a flat pan... even a pie plate will do. Line it with heavy duty tin foil and mix your googe in that. When you are done, just pull out the tinfoil and toss it. Better to mix in flat pans since the stuff is spread out and you can control the exothermic reaction (is that what they call it) The more the mass of the stuff, the hotter it gets, anyway. Put it in the freezer when you aren't using it. I've gotten a week's worth of work off a batch doing that... but I wouldn't try that if I was really worried about the integrity of the reaction. Just for slop jobs... epoxy is FUN!

Andrew
03-29-2001, 07:51 AM
Originally posted by Bob Cleek:
epoxy is FUN!

Do my eyes deceive me?

Andrew
03-29-2001, 07:51 AM
Originally posted by Bob Cleek:
epoxy is FUN!

Do my eyes deceive me?

Andrew
03-29-2001, 07:51 AM
Originally posted by Bob Cleek:
epoxy is FUN!

Do my eyes deceive me?

NormMessinger
03-29-2001, 08:25 AM
I donno, Bob. Mixing in a shallow container makes thorough mixing more difficult. In a shallow tray, it would be nearly impossible in a reasonable amount of time. Better to mix in a deep dish and pour into the cookie sheet if you're set on the technique.

Methinks the man is pulling our leg, gentlemen.

--Norm

NormMessinger
03-29-2001, 08:25 AM
I donno, Bob. Mixing in a shallow container makes thorough mixing more difficult. In a shallow tray, it would be nearly impossible in a reasonable amount of time. Better to mix in a deep dish and pour into the cookie sheet if you're set on the technique.

Methinks the man is pulling our leg, gentlemen.

--Norm

NormMessinger
03-29-2001, 08:25 AM
I donno, Bob. Mixing in a shallow container makes thorough mixing more difficult. In a shallow tray, it would be nearly impossible in a reasonable amount of time. Better to mix in a deep dish and pour into the cookie sheet if you're set on the technique.

Methinks the man is pulling our leg, gentlemen.

--Norm

gashmore
03-29-2001, 09:24 AM
I do all my grocery shopping choices based on what kind of container it comes in. Jello pudding, Dannon yogert, Philidelphia soft cream cheese and Dream Whip come in the most durable containers. Cottage cheese and sour cream containers only last for one or two batches. For big batches, the gallon size ice cream containers work fine.

You do need to run them through the dishwasher a couple of times before use to make sure all the grease and oil is removed.

If I am running low and on a diet, I just put out the word around the family and the neighborhood and am quickly deluged with mixing cups.

Thus far I have mixed almost 100 gallons of epoxy and haven't bought a cup yet.

Also, the mixing sticks that West sells for $1.65/dozen are available at craft stores in boxes of 1,000 for about $6.00.

gashmore
03-29-2001, 09:24 AM
I do all my grocery shopping choices based on what kind of container it comes in. Jello pudding, Dannon yogert, Philidelphia soft cream cheese and Dream Whip come in the most durable containers. Cottage cheese and sour cream containers only last for one or two batches. For big batches, the gallon size ice cream containers work fine.

You do need to run them through the dishwasher a couple of times before use to make sure all the grease and oil is removed.

If I am running low and on a diet, I just put out the word around the family and the neighborhood and am quickly deluged with mixing cups.

Thus far I have mixed almost 100 gallons of epoxy and haven't bought a cup yet.

Also, the mixing sticks that West sells for $1.65/dozen are available at craft stores in boxes of 1,000 for about $6.00.

gashmore
03-29-2001, 09:24 AM
I do all my grocery shopping choices based on what kind of container it comes in. Jello pudding, Dannon yogert, Philidelphia soft cream cheese and Dream Whip come in the most durable containers. Cottage cheese and sour cream containers only last for one or two batches. For big batches, the gallon size ice cream containers work fine.

You do need to run them through the dishwasher a couple of times before use to make sure all the grease and oil is removed.

If I am running low and on a diet, I just put out the word around the family and the neighborhood and am quickly deluged with mixing cups.

Thus far I have mixed almost 100 gallons of epoxy and haven't bought a cup yet.

Also, the mixing sticks that West sells for $1.65/dozen are available at craft stores in boxes of 1,000 for about $6.00.

gashmore
03-29-2001, 09:29 AM
Should have mentioned. Last time I had a life insurance exam, the med tech gave me about 50 graduated urine sample cups. They come in kits from the insurance companies and many times the exam doesn't require a sample so they are unused.

gashmore
03-29-2001, 09:29 AM
Should have mentioned. Last time I had a life insurance exam, the med tech gave me about 50 graduated urine sample cups. They come in kits from the insurance companies and many times the exam doesn't require a sample so they are unused.

gashmore
03-29-2001, 09:29 AM
Should have mentioned. Last time I had a life insurance exam, the med tech gave me about 50 graduated urine sample cups. They come in kits from the insurance companies and many times the exam doesn't require a sample so they are unused.