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Ian Wright
02-09-2004, 10:45 AM
Thought I'd better move this...

The cement board between my Taylor heater and a wooden bulkhead has disintegrated. Damp down the flue and removing the heater for a fifteen year service has had the normal result.
Question:-
What heat proof sheet material 3/16 or 1/4 inch thick, sawable and drillable, able to take a slight curve (for the deakhead) should I replace it with?

IanW

Ian Wright
02-09-2004, 10:45 AM
Thought I'd better move this...

The cement board between my Taylor heater and a wooden bulkhead has disintegrated. Damp down the flue and removing the heater for a fifteen year service has had the normal result.
Question:-
What heat proof sheet material 3/16 or 1/4 inch thick, sawable and drillable, able to take a slight curve (for the deakhead) should I replace it with?

IanW

Ian Wright
02-09-2004, 10:45 AM
Thought I'd better move this...

The cement board between my Taylor heater and a wooden bulkhead has disintegrated. Damp down the flue and removing the heater for a fifteen year service has had the normal result.
Question:-
What heat proof sheet material 3/16 or 1/4 inch thick, sawable and drillable, able to take a slight curve (for the deakhead) should I replace it with?

IanW

Hughman
02-09-2004, 11:10 AM
How about roofing copper mounted on offsets (spacers)?

Hughman
02-09-2004, 11:10 AM
How about roofing copper mounted on offsets (spacers)?

Hughman
02-09-2004, 11:10 AM
How about roofing copper mounted on offsets (spacers)?

George Roberts
02-09-2004, 11:50 AM
Copper sounds good (and cheap). Stainless sheet, silicon bronze.

George Roberts
02-09-2004, 11:50 AM
Copper sounds good (and cheap). Stainless sheet, silicon bronze.

George Roberts
02-09-2004, 11:50 AM
Copper sounds good (and cheap). Stainless sheet, silicon bronze.

Ron Williamson
02-09-2004, 12:49 PM
1/4" cement board is available here.It's tougher than you'd think.
R

Ron Williamson
02-09-2004, 12:49 PM
1/4" cement board is available here.It's tougher than you'd think.
R

Ron Williamson
02-09-2004, 12:49 PM
1/4" cement board is available here.It's tougher than you'd think.
R

whb
02-09-2004, 03:23 PM
Check out a fireplace store. They often sell shields so that stoves can be installed closer to the walls than they should be.

Their shields are probably more expensive than what you would pay at a sheet good supplier.

However, they have nice insulated connectors (that you can probably buy from them separately) so that the heat from your shield doesn't transfer through the connector to the wall.

Howard

whb
02-09-2004, 03:23 PM
Check out a fireplace store. They often sell shields so that stoves can be installed closer to the walls than they should be.

Their shields are probably more expensive than what you would pay at a sheet good supplier.

However, they have nice insulated connectors (that you can probably buy from them separately) so that the heat from your shield doesn't transfer through the connector to the wall.

Howard

whb
02-09-2004, 03:23 PM
Check out a fireplace store. They often sell shields so that stoves can be installed closer to the walls than they should be.

Their shields are probably more expensive than what you would pay at a sheet good supplier.

However, they have nice insulated connectors (that you can probably buy from them separately) so that the heat from your shield doesn't transfer through the connector to the wall.

Howard

ion barnes
02-12-2004, 11:54 PM
I had the use of a sheetmetal fireplace in a mobilehome many years ago and was amazed at the insulating quality of the two heat shields mount to the back skin of sheetmetal. With a good size fire (for its capacity), the back was cool enough to keep my hand on it. The shields were spaced 1" apart. The advantage of the metal heat shields is the convection current that is set up. The exterior of the exhaust stack can be also dressed up the same way.

ion barnes
02-12-2004, 11:54 PM
I had the use of a sheetmetal fireplace in a mobilehome many years ago and was amazed at the insulating quality of the two heat shields mount to the back skin of sheetmetal. With a good size fire (for its capacity), the back was cool enough to keep my hand on it. The shields were spaced 1" apart. The advantage of the metal heat shields is the convection current that is set up. The exterior of the exhaust stack can be also dressed up the same way.

ion barnes
02-12-2004, 11:54 PM
I had the use of a sheetmetal fireplace in a mobilehome many years ago and was amazed at the insulating quality of the two heat shields mount to the back skin of sheetmetal. With a good size fire (for its capacity), the back was cool enough to keep my hand on it. The shields were spaced 1" apart. The advantage of the metal heat shields is the convection current that is set up. The exterior of the exhaust stack can be also dressed up the same way.