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CK 17
11-01-2015, 12:56 AM
An interesting short on "love". I think it's mostly true.


http://www.onbeing.org/blog/trent-gilliss-the-darkest-truth-about-love/8078

L.W. Baxter
11-01-2015, 09:05 AM
I couldn't disagree more. We are only separate and alone for an eyeblink. And the solitude is a gift. Not being completely understood makes us individual and free.

I spend most of my life alone in my thoughts, and that is just how I want it.

The intimacy of love is like food when one is hungry. And it is not difficult to be sated if one is psychologically healthy.

Reynard38
11-01-2015, 09:26 AM
Don't look for custom fit in an off the rack world.

Keith Wilson
11-01-2015, 09:48 AM
Nah. It's a partial truth at best. Love and connection are real, and separation and loneliness are also real - or they're both equally illusory, take your pick.

People have this mistaken belief that the more uncomfortable an idea, the more likely it is to be true. What's real is what it is, and has nothing to do with how we feel about it either way.

McMike
11-01-2015, 10:03 AM
What's real is what it is, and has nothing to do with how we feel about it either way.

This is so simply true that it seems folks don't trust it to be true.

Gerarddm
11-01-2015, 10:04 AM
The darkest truth about love is that it is not immutable.

This is is a profoundly sad sentence: " We were the loves of each other's lives, but it didn't matter".

McMike
11-01-2015, 10:08 AM
The darkest truth about love is that it is not immutable.

This is is a profoundly sad sentence: " We were the loves of each other's lives, but it didn't matter".

It's not sad, its freeing. To do something, to act on something with such commitment, intensity, when in the end, it doesn't really matter, makes it that much more meaningful. Yet, if you chose to not love, it's not such a infinite crime either.

David G
11-01-2015, 10:24 AM
I was set to disagree with the poem... until I re-read the last sentence.

It's a bit of rhetorical judo. It turns the over-wrought, over-stated, over-blown earlier sentences on their ear. I'm gonna guess that the author deliberately over-stated the negative side in order to more dramatically reverse things with that final sentence.

And I appreciate the effort. But if fails by both being a bit too contrived, and a bit too opaque (as shown by the responses here).

Or... maybe they didn't intend an actual reversal as much as they tried to say - nonetheless... we must carry on in hope - because we are human. Again... it's a bit too obscure to be sure.

Ted Hoppe
11-01-2015, 10:42 AM
That was fatalist. Most lines in that poem from someone who has yet found and nurtured profound love.

The darkest truth about love, We leave those we love most as we step into the dark.

CK 17
11-01-2015, 11:31 AM
"Or... maybe they didn't intend an actual reversal as much as they tried to say - nonetheless... we must carry on in hope - because we are human."

this is what I thought they were saying, nothing more nothing less.

Keith Wilson
11-01-2015, 03:02 PM
The darkest truth about love is that it is not immutable. The fundamental truth about being human is that nothing we do is immutable. Love fades, or it doesn't, and then the lovers die. Nobody gets out of here alive, and nothing we build lasts. The wood rots, the steel rusts, the bricks crumble, the ideas are corrupted by the venal or fools and then forgotten altogether, the songs and poetry and books are forgotten, and eventually even the language they're written in will be indecipherable. Some of us, through genius or luck or great villainy, are remembered a little longer, but not very long. The empires fall, the civilizations are lost, the great cites are buried under ruins and then forests or desert sands. All of our loves and hates and friendships and triumphs and disasters and achievements and virtues and vices are nothing at all in the long view, mayflies over the pond, dust in the wind, snowflakes in the warming air, soon gone and forgotten.

And you know what? It doesn't matter. We don't live on that scale; we live today, and maybe tomorrow if we're lucky. Whether we do good or ill, whether we're kind or cruel, whether we build good things or not, none of that may matter in the long run, but it matters to us, here, now, the only way it can matter, in the only time we're given. That's enough.