PDA

View Full Version : Metric screws



Yanis Abols
09-19-2000, 04:33 PM
Hello,
As I have no way of finding this information in France,what is the metric equivalent of a size 6, 8, 10, 12 14, 16 wood screw ?
Thank you.

Yanis Abols
09-19-2000, 04:33 PM
Hello,
As I have no way of finding this information in France,what is the metric equivalent of a size 6, 8, 10, 12 14, 16 wood screw ?
Thank you.

Yanis Abols
09-19-2000, 04:33 PM
Hello,
As I have no way of finding this information in France,what is the metric equivalent of a size 6, 8, 10, 12 14, 16 wood screw ?
Thank you.

ishmael
09-19-2000, 04:59 PM
Interesting question Yanis, but I wonder if France or Britain might be just the place to find out. There must be equivilents discussed and en-tabled. I assume you have plans that call for the one and you want to know the other? Worse comes to worse, buy a set of the former (6,8,10, etc,) from some supplier here, and make a visual comparison to the screws you wish to use. Good luck.

ishmael
09-19-2000, 04:59 PM
Interesting question Yanis, but I wonder if France or Britain might be just the place to find out. There must be equivilents discussed and en-tabled. I assume you have plans that call for the one and you want to know the other? Worse comes to worse, buy a set of the former (6,8,10, etc,) from some supplier here, and make a visual comparison to the screws you wish to use. Good luck.

ishmael
09-19-2000, 04:59 PM
Interesting question Yanis, but I wonder if France or Britain might be just the place to find out. There must be equivilents discussed and en-tabled. I assume you have plans that call for the one and you want to know the other? Worse comes to worse, buy a set of the former (6,8,10, etc,) from some supplier here, and make a visual comparison to the screws you wish to use. Good luck.

htom
09-19-2000, 06:10 PM
American sizes, in detail:
http://www.americanfastener.com/techref/wood.htm

Given these precise measurements (although in the American system), it should be possible to find the corresponding, nearly the same, metric screws.

2.54 cm = 1.0 in.

htom
09-19-2000, 06:10 PM
American sizes, in detail:
http://www.americanfastener.com/techref/wood.htm

Given these precise measurements (although in the American system), it should be possible to find the corresponding, nearly the same, metric screws.

2.54 cm = 1.0 in.

htom
09-19-2000, 06:10 PM
American sizes, in detail:
http://www.americanfastener.com/techref/wood.htm

Given these precise measurements (although in the American system), it should be possible to find the corresponding, nearly the same, metric screws.

2.54 cm = 1.0 in.

redjim777
09-19-2000, 06:33 PM
Per "The Elements of Boat Strength" by Dave Gerr: No. 6 = 3.51mm, 8 = 4.17mm, 10 = 4.83mm, 12 = 5.49mm, 14 = 6.15mm & 16 = 6.81mm


Jim

redjim777
09-19-2000, 06:33 PM
Per "The Elements of Boat Strength" by Dave Gerr: No. 6 = 3.51mm, 8 = 4.17mm, 10 = 4.83mm, 12 = 5.49mm, 14 = 6.15mm & 16 = 6.81mm


Jim

redjim777
09-19-2000, 06:33 PM
Per "The Elements of Boat Strength" by Dave Gerr: No. 6 = 3.51mm, 8 = 4.17mm, 10 = 4.83mm, 12 = 5.49mm, 14 = 6.15mm & 16 = 6.81mm


Jim

ishmael
09-19-2000, 08:26 PM
Whew Yanis, this place is pretty good huh!? Sorta "Seek and yee shall find" Gotta love it!

ishmael
09-19-2000, 08:26 PM
Whew Yanis, this place is pretty good huh!? Sorta "Seek and yee shall find" Gotta love it!

ishmael
09-19-2000, 08:26 PM
Whew Yanis, this place is pretty good huh!? Sorta "Seek and yee shall find" Gotta love it!

John B
09-19-2000, 10:15 PM
yes that is good.
we're a metric country here in Godzone but the screws are all in gauge measurements. I've never heard of screws being measured in millimetres. drill bits, bolts etc yes. 6mm = 1/4 in etc.

John B
09-19-2000, 10:15 PM
yes that is good.
we're a metric country here in Godzone but the screws are all in gauge measurements. I've never heard of screws being measured in millimetres. drill bits, bolts etc yes. 6mm = 1/4 in etc.

John B
09-19-2000, 10:15 PM
yes that is good.
we're a metric country here in Godzone but the screws are all in gauge measurements. I've never heard of screws being measured in millimetres. drill bits, bolts etc yes. 6mm = 1/4 in etc.

TomRobb
09-20-2000, 06:58 AM
Bolts and machine screws can be metric. Wood screws too?

TomRobb
09-20-2000, 06:58 AM
Bolts and machine screws can be metric. Wood screws too?

TomRobb
09-20-2000, 06:58 AM
Bolts and machine screws can be metric. Wood screws too?

htom
09-20-2000, 12:20 PM
Wood screws can be metric, and they don't seem to be just re-labeling of American sizes, although I'm sure that there are proper equivalents. It appears that the metric standard measures the distance between threads (pitch 1 mm) rather than the number of threads per inch (25.4 tpi), as "we" do. It's not like the Europeans don't use screws to build wooden boats, after all!

DIN 95 and DIN 7995 are oval head wood screws

DIN 96 and DIN 7996 are round head wood screws

DIN 97 and DIN 7997 are flat head wood screws

The drawings look remarkably like other drawings of screws. The dimensions are metric, but the places I've found them on the web don't have the details of the chart I posted previously (the drawings I've found are comprably labeled but the data is missing in the accompaing table.)

DIN, like the American standards organizations, appears to only sell their reference documents, rather than posting them as well, for those of us who just want to browse. http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/frown.gif

htom
09-20-2000, 12:20 PM
Wood screws can be metric, and they don't seem to be just re-labeling of American sizes, although I'm sure that there are proper equivalents. It appears that the metric standard measures the distance between threads (pitch 1 mm) rather than the number of threads per inch (25.4 tpi), as "we" do. It's not like the Europeans don't use screws to build wooden boats, after all!

DIN 95 and DIN 7995 are oval head wood screws

DIN 96 and DIN 7996 are round head wood screws

DIN 97 and DIN 7997 are flat head wood screws

The drawings look remarkably like other drawings of screws. The dimensions are metric, but the places I've found them on the web don't have the details of the chart I posted previously (the drawings I've found are comprably labeled but the data is missing in the accompaing table.)

DIN, like the American standards organizations, appears to only sell their reference documents, rather than posting them as well, for those of us who just want to browse. http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/frown.gif

htom
09-20-2000, 12:20 PM
Wood screws can be metric, and they don't seem to be just re-labeling of American sizes, although I'm sure that there are proper equivalents. It appears that the metric standard measures the distance between threads (pitch 1 mm) rather than the number of threads per inch (25.4 tpi), as "we" do. It's not like the Europeans don't use screws to build wooden boats, after all!

DIN 95 and DIN 7995 are oval head wood screws

DIN 96 and DIN 7996 are round head wood screws

DIN 97 and DIN 7997 are flat head wood screws

The drawings look remarkably like other drawings of screws. The dimensions are metric, but the places I've found them on the web don't have the details of the chart I posted previously (the drawings I've found are comprably labeled but the data is missing in the accompaing table.)

DIN, like the American standards organizations, appears to only sell their reference documents, rather than posting them as well, for those of us who just want to browse. http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/frown.gif

Yanis Abols
09-20-2000, 04:13 PM
Bonjour,
Thank you for the information on american measurments of wood screws.
To return some information, in metric countries (and boat plans) wood screws are describded by the diameter of the body in mm and the length of the screw in mm. A 4x25 screw is 4 mm in body diameter and 25 mm (or 2,5cm) long.

Yanis Abols
09-20-2000, 04:13 PM
Bonjour,
Thank you for the information on american measurments of wood screws.
To return some information, in metric countries (and boat plans) wood screws are describded by the diameter of the body in mm and the length of the screw in mm. A 4x25 screw is 4 mm in body diameter and 25 mm (or 2,5cm) long.

Yanis Abols
09-20-2000, 04:13 PM
Bonjour,
Thank you for the information on american measurments of wood screws.
To return some information, in metric countries (and boat plans) wood screws are describded by the diameter of the body in mm and the length of the screw in mm. A 4x25 screw is 4 mm in body diameter and 25 mm (or 2,5cm) long.

NormMessinger
09-21-2000, 08:13 AM
Have you seen Brian Toss's most recent rant on his web site? He presents a very good arguement against using metric. There is also a good rebutal.

I could deal with metric if only for the handiness of screw sizes. It would sure simplify selecting a bit to drill a pilot hole. Thanks Yanis.

--Norm

NormMessinger
09-21-2000, 08:13 AM
Have you seen Brian Toss's most recent rant on his web site? He presents a very good arguement against using metric. There is also a good rebutal.

I could deal with metric if only for the handiness of screw sizes. It would sure simplify selecting a bit to drill a pilot hole. Thanks Yanis.

--Norm

NormMessinger
09-21-2000, 08:13 AM
Have you seen Brian Toss's most recent rant on his web site? He presents a very good arguement against using metric. There is also a good rebutal.

I could deal with metric if only for the handiness of screw sizes. It would sure simplify selecting a bit to drill a pilot hole. Thanks Yanis.

--Norm

TomRobb
09-22-2000, 07:00 AM
Norm, I read the rant. Where did you see the rebutal?

TomRobb
09-22-2000, 07:00 AM
Norm, I read the rant. Where did you see the rebutal?

TomRobb
09-22-2000, 07:00 AM
Norm, I read the rant. Where did you see the rebutal?

NormMessinger
09-22-2000, 08:14 AM
Good Morning, Tom. The rebuttal is in Spartalk, Aug 29 by Erik Hammarlund. Much earlier others tried with trite arguements most of which Brian ignored. Try this URL:
http://www.briantoss.com/wwwboard/messages/2993.html

--Norm

NormMessinger
09-22-2000, 08:14 AM
Good Morning, Tom. The rebuttal is in Spartalk, Aug 29 by Erik Hammarlund. Much earlier others tried with trite arguements most of which Brian ignored. Try this URL:
http://www.briantoss.com/wwwboard/messages/2993.html

--Norm

NormMessinger
09-22-2000, 08:14 AM
Good Morning, Tom. The rebuttal is in Spartalk, Aug 29 by Erik Hammarlund. Much earlier others tried with trite arguements most of which Brian ignored. Try this URL:
http://www.briantoss.com/wwwboard/messages/2993.html

--Norm