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paulf
10-04-2015, 07:58 PM
NASA site has some interesting data regarding atmospheric CO2. It's a good read and loaded with all fun stuff.

More at, http://climate.nasa.gov/evidence/#.VhE7WNTlzKd.facebook

http://climate.nasa.gov/system/content_pages/main_images/203_co2-graph-080315.jpg

Jim Bow
10-04-2015, 08:23 PM
Data, facts, and the scientific method.

CWSmith
10-04-2015, 08:53 PM
It's not just the value. It's the derivative!

paulf
10-04-2015, 09:19 PM
Looks like I'm preaching to the choir!

Can I get an AMEN brothers?

LeeG
10-04-2015, 10:23 PM
RIP

WX
10-05-2015, 05:26 AM
Amen brother.

skuthorp
10-05-2015, 05:32 AM
I think the present scientific estimation of warming is 4 degrees by centuries end, and climbing.
That will put a deal of pressure on civilisation as we know it now.

Peerie Maa
10-05-2015, 05:33 AM
Extreme events The number of record high temperature events in the United States has been increasing, while the number of record low temperature events has been decreasing, since 1950. The U.S. has also witnessed increasing numbers of intense rainfall events.11 (http://climate.nasa.gov/evidence/#footnote_11)


We got many forumites living on river banks or their flood plains?

Paul Pless
10-05-2015, 05:41 AM
Data, facts, and the scientific method.

Red free thread eh?

Duncan Gibbs
10-05-2015, 05:49 AM
Can I get an AMEN brothers?


RIP
^ What he said.


We got many forumites living on river banks or their flood plains?
With 12 metres rise I'd be on a lovely head of the bay with 30km of crinkly, board, inland waterways. Big jetty timbers are just up the hill! :D


Red free thread eh?
Tick tock!

CWSmith
10-05-2015, 07:57 AM
That will put a deal of pressure on civilisation as we know it now.

I fear that is the great understatement of the times. If what we see is not just "global warming", but climate change, we could see tremendous disruption of farming here and around the globe. Then, if you have ever read Shoes of the Fisherman, you know what comes next.

ahp
10-05-2015, 10:37 AM
High CO2 is directly not good for us. It causes acidosis. Not good.

Dan McCosh
10-05-2015, 10:59 AM
We got many forumites living on river banks or their flood plains?I do.

Paul Pless
10-05-2015, 11:06 AM
I do.

~600 ft above sea level though. . .

CK 17
10-05-2015, 11:10 AM
More carbon, more heat. More heat, more moisture. More moisture, more rain. More rain, less carbon. Less carbon, less heat. The system worked pretty good when the source of carbon was volcanic, forest fires, an asteroid here and there. Then we came along and unlocked the carbon sequestered in oil and coal.

CK 17
10-05-2015, 11:11 AM
~600 ft above sea level though. . .
So is the river. . . :)

chas
10-05-2015, 11:26 AM
Tks Paul,

Found this in your link and look forward to taking it for a test drive. / Jim

http://www.retscreen.net/ang/centre.php

paulf
10-05-2015, 10:01 PM
I'm curious why some folks didn't refute these data. I realize NASA is a big government organization, but there could have been an alternate point of view.

Disappointed in the alternative view folks.

But I'm sure NASA is right on.

WX
10-05-2015, 10:11 PM
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-10-05/extreme-el-nino-system-intensifying3a-drought-and-heightened-f/6828772

With Australia in the grip of an extreme El Nino weather event, more heatwaves and a heightened bushfire risk are expected this summer.
Internationally it is being described as a "Godzilla El Nino", and while forecasters here are a little more conservative with their language, they say the weather event is tipped to rival the monster El Nino of 1997.
Dr Andrew Watkins, the manager of climate predictions with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, said parts of Australia had already experienced high temperatures, with Melbourne about 16 degrees above the average on Monday.
"We could probably attribute this to the El Nino event that we're seeing at the moment, those clear skies, dry soil, not much rain about to keep things cool and that weather, that hot weather, now feeding in over south-eastern Australia," he said.
El Nino is often associated with drier-than-usual conditions across eastern and northern Australia.
It also brings a lower chance of cyclones to the north, but the risk of fire in the south-east is higher as are more extreme temperatures everywhere.
It is bad news for the nation's farmers who are already experiencing the big dry.

PeterSibley
10-05-2015, 10:49 PM
Red free thread eh?

Another of those inconvenient truths .

varadero
10-06-2015, 03:02 AM
Blame it on the Southern hemisphere.

http://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/thumbnails/image/mainco2mappia18934.jpg

paulf
10-06-2015, 10:24 AM
Thanks varadero, interesting program. "orbiting carbon observatory" Here. http://oco.jpl.nasa.gov/

chas
10-06-2015, 11:38 AM
"I'm curious why some folks didn't refute these data. I realize NASA is a big government organization, but there could have been an alternate point of view."

http://climate.nasa.gov/news/2248/

This may be what you are looking for, Paul. The R-2000 program in Canada has been developing this concept for a number of years now. The swing recently tries to include air quality as a component. I'm sure the builder members in here are aware of their countries involvement in energy-efficient housing programs.
NASA's late entry into the field is hardly innovative. / Jim

varadero
10-06-2015, 12:10 PM
Thanks varadero, interesting program. "orbiting carbon observatory" Here. http://oco.jpl.nasa.gov/
What is interesting, is where the high CO2 areas are, not where you expect..

Canoez
10-06-2015, 12:23 PM
What is interesting, is where the high CO2 areas are, not where you expect..

Yes and no. The difference between the high and low levels aren't that striking (only 15.5 PPM) and if you look at circulation patterns in the atmosphere, that would probably explain some of what you find interesting.

varadero
10-06-2015, 01:01 PM
I expected to see high CO2 in the developed/ industrial areas, not in the low population/ forested/undeveloped areas, or the oceanic island groups.

Canoez
10-06-2015, 01:05 PM
I expected to see high CO2 in the developed/ industrial areas, not in the low population/ forested/undeveloped areas, or the oceanic island groups.

Yes, but think about the fact that those areas are warmer and probably have more atmospheric circulation from the warmth, dispersing elsewhere.

This may or may not be of interest:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qh011eAYjAA

Rum_Pirate
10-06-2015, 01:15 PM
Looks like I'm preaching to the choir!

Can I get an AMEN brothers?



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zUDxQ7r1FL8

varadero
10-06-2015, 01:57 PM
Yes, but think about the fact that those areas are warmer and probably have more atmospheric circulation from the warmth, dispersing elsewhere.

This may or may not be of interest:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qh011eAYjAA

That makes no sense, please explain more.

Canoez
10-06-2015, 02:18 PM
According to a January study by The National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo., major population areas generate sufficient levels of heat to alter atmospheric circulation systems. The collaborative report, which features FSU professor of meteorology Ming Cai, contributes to the scientific theories of global warming, particularly in densely-populated regions of the Northern Hemisphere.

Start there.

varadero
10-06-2015, 02:34 PM
Are you referring to UHI?

Peter Malcolm Jardine
10-06-2015, 02:48 PM
I fear that is the great understatement of the times. If what we see is not just "global warming", but climate change, we could see tremendous disruption of farming here and around the globe. Then, if you have ever read Shoes of the Fisherman, you know what comes next.


Absolutely. I heard Lindsey Graham on CNN the other night about the flooding in South Carolina, and while he said he agree with climate change being an issue, the weather there was not due to global warming. Wrong again. Scientists have consistently predicted more unstable weather patterns, combined with more severe storms.

Canoez
10-06-2015, 03:06 PM
Are you referring to UHI?
Partially. The other is the relatively new concept of Atmospheric Rivers which affect the global atmospheric circulation which is half of the Atmospheric Rivers. Some are thermal plumes in the ocean. All effect the circulation and concentration of atmospheric contents including CO2, NO2, carbon particulate and others. UHI is a disruption in some of those natural patterns and causes some mixing effects.