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gashmore
10-22-2000, 09:06 AM
I don't particularly care for teak and "holly" plywood soles so I am considering laying 3/8" teak with rock maple strips on 1/2" marine plywood with epoxy. The maple strips can be flush or raised about 3/32" with a beaded edge.

The question is, how hard is it to maintain a raised holly sole? Do the ridges collect dirt? Also it seems that varnish will wear off the ridges first leaving the white wood open to stains.

gashmore
10-22-2000, 09:06 AM
I don't particularly care for teak and "holly" plywood soles so I am considering laying 3/8" teak with rock maple strips on 1/2" marine plywood with epoxy. The maple strips can be flush or raised about 3/32" with a beaded edge.

The question is, how hard is it to maintain a raised holly sole? Do the ridges collect dirt? Also it seems that varnish will wear off the ridges first leaving the white wood open to stains.

gashmore
10-22-2000, 09:06 AM
I don't particularly care for teak and "holly" plywood soles so I am considering laying 3/8" teak with rock maple strips on 1/2" marine plywood with epoxy. The maple strips can be flush or raised about 3/32" with a beaded edge.

The question is, how hard is it to maintain a raised holly sole? Do the ridges collect dirt? Also it seems that varnish will wear off the ridges first leaving the white wood open to stains.

Ian McColgin
10-22-2000, 07:11 PM
You're working too hard. Having helped with a proper teak&holly sole, I learned that it's no harder to do it right and solid - no ply undersole (apologies to Nietzsche) - than what you have in mind.

The idea is that the holly is a bit raised to increase your lateral non-skid. I've lived with a plyphoneyteak&holly on Grana which will be changed when I do my major changes in a couple of years. The ply version does not have raise holly so its non-skid properties are no greater than any other flat surface. Also, Granna lives at 40+ degrees, so nothing except walking in the corner of the sole and the cabin furniture hanging on to the overhead rail works anyway, so I think I'll go with hard pine or something workboat like. For me, the teak and holly bit is overrated but, like a teak deck, it looks nice on someone else's boat.

G'luck

Ian McColgin
10-22-2000, 07:11 PM
You're working too hard. Having helped with a proper teak&holly sole, I learned that it's no harder to do it right and solid - no ply undersole (apologies to Nietzsche) - than what you have in mind.

The idea is that the holly is a bit raised to increase your lateral non-skid. I've lived with a plyphoneyteak&holly on Grana which will be changed when I do my major changes in a couple of years. The ply version does not have raise holly so its non-skid properties are no greater than any other flat surface. Also, Granna lives at 40+ degrees, so nothing except walking in the corner of the sole and the cabin furniture hanging on to the overhead rail works anyway, so I think I'll go with hard pine or something workboat like. For me, the teak and holly bit is overrated but, like a teak deck, it looks nice on someone else's boat.

G'luck

Ian McColgin
10-22-2000, 07:11 PM
You're working too hard. Having helped with a proper teak&holly sole, I learned that it's no harder to do it right and solid - no ply undersole (apologies to Nietzsche) - than what you have in mind.

The idea is that the holly is a bit raised to increase your lateral non-skid. I've lived with a plyphoneyteak&holly on Grana which will be changed when I do my major changes in a couple of years. The ply version does not have raise holly so its non-skid properties are no greater than any other flat surface. Also, Granna lives at 40+ degrees, so nothing except walking in the corner of the sole and the cabin furniture hanging on to the overhead rail works anyway, so I think I'll go with hard pine or something workboat like. For me, the teak and holly bit is overrated but, like a teak deck, it looks nice on someone else's boat.

G'luck

Scott Rosen
10-24-2000, 06:19 PM
I'm with Ian. You're making life too hard. Use 5/8 or 3/4" teak, in widths of six to eight inches. Cut your kerfs at three to four inches apart, and then lay in whatever wood you like. It'll be easier to make and more durable than teak over ply.

How hard to maintain? Depends on how you want it to look. The raised holly will get dinged and banged and eventually wear down, unevenly I might add. Varnish will wear off the corners first, and some staining is inevitable, unless you carry a can of varnish with you every waking minute of every day. But a properly varnished sole can go a good long time between recoatings. If your boat gets lots of use, especially in big or rough seas, you can expect the sole to develop a "used" look no matter what you do. IMHO, a sole that is worn from use, but is otherwise well cared for, has a special charm.

Scott Rosen
10-24-2000, 06:19 PM
I'm with Ian. You're making life too hard. Use 5/8 or 3/4" teak, in widths of six to eight inches. Cut your kerfs at three to four inches apart, and then lay in whatever wood you like. It'll be easier to make and more durable than teak over ply.

How hard to maintain? Depends on how you want it to look. The raised holly will get dinged and banged and eventually wear down, unevenly I might add. Varnish will wear off the corners first, and some staining is inevitable, unless you carry a can of varnish with you every waking minute of every day. But a properly varnished sole can go a good long time between recoatings. If your boat gets lots of use, especially in big or rough seas, you can expect the sole to develop a "used" look no matter what you do. IMHO, a sole that is worn from use, but is otherwise well cared for, has a special charm.

Scott Rosen
10-24-2000, 06:19 PM
I'm with Ian. You're making life too hard. Use 5/8 or 3/4" teak, in widths of six to eight inches. Cut your kerfs at three to four inches apart, and then lay in whatever wood you like. It'll be easier to make and more durable than teak over ply.

How hard to maintain? Depends on how you want it to look. The raised holly will get dinged and banged and eventually wear down, unevenly I might add. Varnish will wear off the corners first, and some staining is inevitable, unless you carry a can of varnish with you every waking minute of every day. But a properly varnished sole can go a good long time between recoatings. If your boat gets lots of use, especially in big or rough seas, you can expect the sole to develop a "used" look no matter what you do. IMHO, a sole that is worn from use, but is otherwise well cared for, has a special charm.

gashmore
10-24-2000, 07:05 PM
I have already made up one panel complete with cover boards around the perimeter. While cleaning up the squeeze out I started thinking about the grunge that can accumulate in the corners.

Actually, it is not all that hard. It takes some time to dry fit but vacuum bagging gives a good tight, flat surface. The tedius part is beading and ripping all those little strips.

In fact, Laying up one panel at a time on ply already cut to fit should be easier than laying the sole in place. Most of the interior cabinet work is tabbed to the hull so the shape is rather complex.

gashmore
10-24-2000, 07:05 PM
I have already made up one panel complete with cover boards around the perimeter. While cleaning up the squeeze out I started thinking about the grunge that can accumulate in the corners.

Actually, it is not all that hard. It takes some time to dry fit but vacuum bagging gives a good tight, flat surface. The tedius part is beading and ripping all those little strips.

In fact, Laying up one panel at a time on ply already cut to fit should be easier than laying the sole in place. Most of the interior cabinet work is tabbed to the hull so the shape is rather complex.

gashmore
10-24-2000, 07:05 PM
I have already made up one panel complete with cover boards around the perimeter. While cleaning up the squeeze out I started thinking about the grunge that can accumulate in the corners.

Actually, it is not all that hard. It takes some time to dry fit but vacuum bagging gives a good tight, flat surface. The tedius part is beading and ripping all those little strips.

In fact, Laying up one panel at a time on ply already cut to fit should be easier than laying the sole in place. Most of the interior cabinet work is tabbed to the hull so the shape is rather complex.