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skuthorp
09-05-2015, 06:50 PM
From the Scientific American. Another slant on the subject the effects of which which apply to europe and Australia equally.

U.S. Droughts Will Be the Worst in 1,000 YearsThe Southwest and central Great Plains will dry out even more than previously thought
By Mark Fischetti (http://www.scientificamerican.com/author/mark-fischetti) | February 12, 2015

SAN FRANCISCO—Several independent studies in recent years have predicted that the American Southwest and central Great Plains will experience extensive droughts in the second half of this century, and that advancing climate change will exacerbate those droughts (http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/2014/03/27/big-climate-danger-could-arrive-as-soon-as-2036/). But a new analysis released today says the drying will be even more extreme than previously predicted—the worst in nearly 1,000 years. Some time between 2050 and 2100, extended drought conditions in both regions will become more severe than the megadroughts of the 12th and 13th centuries. Tree rings and other evidence indicate that those medieval dry periods exceeded anything seen since, across the land we know today as the continental U.S.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/u-s-droughts-will-be-the-worst-in-1-000-years1/

S.V. Airlie
09-05-2015, 06:56 PM
My nephew is fighting these fires as we speak!

skuthorp
09-05-2015, 07:03 PM
There are succeeding groups of Aussie fire fighters there as well. We are preparing for a hot dry summer after a very short spring here. The plants and birds are a month ahead of what was normal and the rainfall about half.
All the best to your nephew and may he keep safe. I've fought big bush fires and it's not much fun.

S.V. Airlie
09-05-2015, 07:06 PM
There are succeeding groups of Aussie fire fighters there as well. We are preparing for a hot dry summer after a very short spring here. The plants and birds are a month ahead of what was normal and the rainfall about half.
All the best to your nephew and may he keep safe. I've fought big bush fires and it's not much fun.I hope so too! Not many updates from his mom. I suspect I won't see him much when I'm there for a visit in early Oct. On my mind though!

PeterSibley
09-05-2015, 08:17 PM
Could a drought of this magnitude could make some areas in the US uninhabitable ?

WI-Tom
09-05-2015, 09:33 PM
Could a drought of this magnitude could make some areas in the US uninhabitable ?

Some areas in the US are uninhabitable NOW, but that hasn't stopped rampant growth in places like Phoenix and Vegas.

Tom

PeterSibley
09-05-2015, 10:00 PM
Vegas without snowfall in the Rockies ?

WX
09-05-2015, 10:47 PM
My daughter lives in Palm Springs...they don't spend a lot of time outside in the summer.

Paul Girouard
09-05-2015, 11:20 PM
Some areas in the US are uninhabitable NOW, but that hasn't stopped rampant growth in places like Phoenix and Vegas.

Tom

Seems there not uninhabitable then, maybe you have a new age definition for uninhabitable?

WI-Tom
09-05-2015, 11:42 PM
Seems there not uninhabitable then, maybe you have a new age definition for uninhabitable?

No, I think it's quite reasonable to call them "uninhabitable" (by modern humans) from an ecological standpoint. The only thing that makes it possible for modern life to concentrate in arid to semi-arid locations like these and others in the American West is a massive and unsustainable diversion of energy and resources from other regions. They are artificially "inhabitable" at best.

The sad thing is, we knew this by the early to mid-1800s, when people like Powell were sending scientific reports to that effect back to Washington, while "Rain follows the plow" was the message bouncing back from Washington so speculators could get rich selling low-value land. As long as the rich keep getting richer, anything (apparently) is ok.

Tom

oznabrag
09-05-2015, 11:44 PM
Seems there not uninhabitable then, maybe you have a new age definition for uninhabitable?

God is punishing the US for having elected Ronald Reagan twice.

The scorching and thirst will continue until morale improves and we elect Bernie Sanders twice.

That is all.

Nicholas Carey
09-06-2015, 01:06 AM
There are succeeding groups of Aussie fire fighters there as well. We are preparing for a hot dry summer after a very short spring here. The plants and birds are a month ahead of what was normal and the rainfall about half.
All the best to your nephew and may he keep safe. I've fought big bush fires and it's not much fun.


Yes...apparently, we've brought a bunch of fire bosses from Oz and Enzed into the Pacific Northwest in the last couple of weeks.

My cousin's kid (does that make him a 1st cousin once removed? I get confused) lives in St. Catherines, Ontario (near Toronto and Buffalo, NY). His fire crew got deployed a couple weeks ago to the Nez Percé reservation, near the Washington-Idaho border.

PeterSibley
09-06-2015, 02:41 AM
No, I think it's quite reasonable to call them "uninhabitable" (by modern humans) from an ecological standpoint. The only thing that makes it possible for modern life to concentrate in arid to semi-arid locations like these and others in the American West is a massive and unsustainable diversion of energy and resources from other regions. They are artificially "inhabitable" at best.

The sad thing is, we knew this by the early to mid-1800s, when people like Powell were sending scientific reports to that effect back to Washington, while "Rain follows the plow" was the message bouncing back from Washington so speculators could get rich selling low-value land. As long as the rich keep getting richer, anything (apparently) is ok.

Tom

I wish that was a joke !

ahp
09-06-2015, 11:32 AM
Whether the south western US is habitable depends on how much you can spend to live there, or do business there. It will be very expensive.

I might invest in beach property on Hudson Bay.