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View Full Version : Common Sense 1 has a new home



Jay Greer
08-21-2015, 03:43 PM
Matt Walsh's famous pocket racer cruiser has found a new home tied up next to "Bright Star" in Newport Harbor CA. This little 28' sloop
is number one of a fleet of six extraordinary little boats. Faster than an R class and many six meter sloops, the new owner of this amazing little boat, built in 1932, intends to race her again. This is the boat whose sister ship CSIII was second boat to clear the West End of Catalina Island in the 1934 transpac race. CSI was nearly neck and neck with the scratch boat the 61' schooner "Manuiwa" as they cleared the west end. The tiny sloop would have undoubtably won the race had she not been dismasted due to losing a backstay when half way to Honolulu. After three days of jury rigging the mast and sailing with a single capsized genoa she still managed to finish placing fourth in her class still back in the fleet but not last boat to finish, according to race chronicler Skip Warren.
This is the boat that caused the Transpac committee to rule that all boats had to longer in overall length than previously permitted there by eliminating the class from future races. She has been fully re-built and may still prove to be a formatable contender for races other than the Transpac.
Jay
https://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a5d600b3127ccee9bf39528a6b00000030O00QYsmrNy5bsQ e3nwg/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00107990352120150821200302590.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/

Jay Greer
08-22-2015, 01:30 PM
Here is a shot of #1 shortly after her launching in 1932. Sadly, the boat had a clunky deck house added latter in life. Some one forgot to slack the topping lift too.
Jay
https://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a5dd01b3127ccee8fdc686754c00000030O00QYsmrNy5bsQ e3nwg/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00107990352120150320232313954.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/

Jay Greer
08-22-2015, 07:46 PM
This is #1 after being sailed up from San Diego to Newport Beach CA. eight years ago for her restoration. We nearly sank due to a sprung butt block.
Height of rig is 44' above deck on a 28'boat! Five and a half thousand pounds of ballast keep here on her feet.
Jayhttps://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a5d603b3127ccee9b80d04421e00000030O00QYsmrNy5bsQ e3nwg/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00107990352120150823003520727.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/

Jay Greer
08-24-2015, 01:07 PM
#1 in 1932. She has her ringtail set which adds about eighty sq. ft.or more to the area of the main. Note the four masted ship in the background. Does anyone know what ship it might be?
Jay
https://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a5d605b3127ccee9a5dff5b04500000030O00QYsmrNy5bsQ e3nwg/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00107990352120150824180419666.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/

Jay Greer
08-25-2015, 12:25 PM
Here is the underbody of number five. The quick turn of the after bilge and the long easy run is a clue to the stability and speed of this little boat. The shape of the ballest keel is interesting as well. I often wonder how Matt Walsh came up with this design so many years ago. Number one cleaned house of West Coast boats over twice her size for many years until she was weighted down with a heavy engine and extra gear. The new owner plans to take her back to being trimmed down to fighting weight.
Jayhttps://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b8ce23b3127ccec510497d79b400000040O00QYsmrNy5bsQ e3nwg/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00107990352120081002232335222.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/

Jay Greer
08-27-2015, 12:53 PM
Taken during restoration. Common Sense !
Jayhttps://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a5d606b3127ccee9a3d85e180000000030O00QYsmrNy5bsQ e3nwg/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00107990352120150827174906101.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/

Jay Greer
08-27-2015, 12:56 PM
Raised deck gives room below and keeps after deck light in weight.
Jayhttps://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a5d606b3127ccee9a36501d9a900000030O00QYsmrNy5bsQ e3nwg/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00107990352120150827174916437.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/

Jay Greer
08-27-2015, 08:31 PM
The owner of CS1 is, currently, working on replacing an eight foot section of the port sheer clamp as it was found to be in need of strengthening at the chain plates. Originally the chains were set up with a bronze flange casting that was bolted to the frames and landed on the underside of the sheer clamp. Although the boat has a new mast, Father Time made it known that it was time to strengthen the set up after eighty three years of sailing with that massive rig. The result being that one of the lower shroud chain plate straps pulling out of the plate and through the covering board. He is now running the upper straps as well as the lowers down to a saddle link under the mast step in the same manner that LF Herreshoff used on the famous yawl "Persophone".
The upper and lower shroud straps will be made of bronze strapping and will rest on a riser with threaded fastenings through the planking, clamps and stringers A pair of turnbuckles at the saddle plate plus an adjustable torsion bar that goes from the step up though the king plank just forward of the mast and partner block will be used to insure better support for the new set of racing sails which will include an asemetrical spinnaker that is being added to the new suit that were recently made by Elliott Pattison sails. Word is that he intends to remove the existing engine and tanks that set the stern down below the DWL
by nearly four inches! The Volvo penta diesel and the fuel takes weigh in at nearly eight hundred pounds! I understand that he intends to go back to the original auxiliary which was a twelve foot white ash sweep.
It will really interesting to seeing how well this boat will perform with it's new rig and modern set of laundry.
Jay

Jay Greer
08-29-2015, 12:49 PM
Here is a shot of number five, which is my boat, at speed off of Marina Del Rey CA. This was a wooden hull owners assc. race. The wind came up with a vengeance and many boats were damaged including the committee boat which was rammed and nearly sunk! According to the Coast Guard the wind gusted up to forty knots at times! One Rodes 33 set a chute at the rounding of the windward mark. The sail blew to shreds in less than a minute! We chose to not fly any trick sails due to the high winds. Even coming about had to be timed between wave crests lest we were swamped. According to the CG we were hitting well over nine knots at times! All in all we smoked the fleet but the race was called off so it all was just one heck of a hoot of a sail! Skip Elliot chose to use this shot for his add in WB which was a great honor for us. All in all, this race confirmed my belief that the Common Sense is truly a magic boat. It sails and handles like a big dinghy and can come about in nearly its own length. It carries in a sneeze of wind or smokes when it blows up as seen here. The amazing thing is that this is a design that is nearly eighty five years old and is built from a half model that was carved by Matt Walsh. Amazingly it can still hold its time boat for boat against modern designs. It goes like stink but is also a well mannered and comfortable cruising boat. I plan to publish her lines in WB when I finish her plans. The article will be based on the format of LF Herreshoffs publications that were written in rudder magazine. The article in WB will be entitled,
"How to Build the Common Sense Sloop". I see it as honoring his memory as well as perpetuating a design that was created by his West Coast contemporary, Matt Walsh. Matt Walsh is considered to be a West Coast legend in boat design, building and racing. He deserves to be remembered as so.
Jay
https://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a0d601b3127ccefabdd63cbc3700000010O00QYsmrNy5bsQ e3nwg/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00107990352120071008023018641.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/

Jay Greer
08-30-2015, 04:18 PM
Since all six of the boats were made from lines taken from the half model that Matt carved back in 1931 no construction plans were ever drawn up and the model no longer seems to exist. I saw it once when I visited Matt's daughter Margaret at Bluff Place which is the family home in San Pedro. This was many years ago. However, I did go to the trouble of taking an accurate set of the lines off of our boat, no. 5, and will be drawing up a full set of both lines drawings and construction plans which I hope will be of interest to someone who wants a nice little cruiser/racer. If and once the article is published in WB it is my hope and wish that someone will see fit to build another Common Sense as well. In fact, if there is enough interest, I would consider donating a set through WB. Who knows, we might even end up with a new fleet of twenty eight foot blow darts. I do plan to build no.7 in Port Townsend. We will be shooting a lot of pictures of the project as well as welcoming visitors who are suffering from boat constructitis and need to ease some of their passion by lending a bit of a hand.
Jay

Jay Greer
08-31-2015, 11:23 PM
At the time I took the lines off of "Red Witch" no.5 I made this sail plan of the Common Sense sloop. I am sorry that I do not have the actual measurments of the rig available here but the hull dimensions are LOL 28' DWL 24'9 draft 5'5"beam 7' dsp. 10,000lbs. The working jib is self taking and the boat is extremely maneuverable and sensitive much like an six meter. Matt Walsh raced it over a fifteen mile course in Los Angeles Harbor in a match race against the Rboat Pirate and beat the R by some 35mininutes.
Jay
https://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a5d610b3127ccee9aae347a24900000030O00QYsmrNy5bsQ e3nwg/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00107990352120150901040435069.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/

Jay Greer
08-31-2015, 11:38 PM
Here is tha actual challange trophy for the match race mentioned above. The engraving depicts both the Rboat "Pirate" and the Common Sense Class Sloop that beat it over the fifteen mile course. "Pirate" belonged to Don Lee who owned the Cadillac agency in Los Angels and a radio station known as Don Lee Radio. "Pirate" was fully restored several years ago by Scott Rohrer and is a featured attraction at the Wooden Boat Festival in Port Townsen. It ties up at the Center For Wooden Boats in Seattle when not on display or racing. The designer/builder of the Common Sense, Matt Walsh was at the helm of his boat. Matt flew his famous "Ring Tail" that increased the area of the main by one third of the actual measured area on the down wind leg. He also flew a masthead spinnaker that had an enormous area as well.
Jay
https://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a5d610b3127ccee9aba18903da00000030O00QYsmrNy5bsQ e3nwg/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00107990352120150901042757866.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/

wizbang 13
08-31-2015, 11:50 PM
dunno jay. you call her common sense, but she looks to me like a rule beating raceboat...
maybe i missed a lot in translation

Jay Greer
09-01-2015, 12:10 AM
Matt Walsh designed the Common Sense sloop for his Daughters, Helen and Margaret, to use for racing out of the California YC and family cruising to Catalina Island. When the boat was first launched, it had no fwd. hatch and only the sliding main scuttle hatch. Matt took it out to the center of LA Harbor and had several of the tug boats he built capsize the boat mast down and keel up. When released, the boat righted itself and the hatch was opened, according to an LA Times reporter, There was less than a quart of water below. This stunt was done for publicity for the LA Boat Show that was held in the Colliseum which is where the Common Sense Class Sloop was first introduced. After the stunt, Matt was reported to have said, "Now isn't that a Common Sense way to build a boat?
You may call it what you wish but having sailed the world over in some pretty amazing high performance sleds and cats, The Common Sense Sloop is still the most amazing boat I have ever owned or sailed!
Jay

wizbang 13
09-01-2015, 08:46 AM
Can you explain "ringtail"?
Is it a watersail?

Jay Greer
09-01-2015, 12:51 PM
If you check the photo No. 4 in this post, you can just see the ringtail Matt has set on No.1 The sail is a studding sail that is set on a jack yard at the mast head and one on the end of the main boom. On this boat it is a long narrow extension to the leech of the main that adds extra sail area on a reach or dead down wind. While it is fun sail to play with. Current rules do not allow such sails to be set in mixed handicap competition. Matt also had a telescoping spinnaker pole that he used for setting an oversized spinnaker. He also would set a sail known as a "Captain's Handkerchief" which was a square sail set at the top of the 3/4 jib hoist and a water sail under the bow sprit. When fully set, the trick sails Matt used made these boats look like Australian 18 Dinghys. This was allowed within events that were strictly for one design competition. The Common Sense Class boats put on a show that had a similar panache that the recent Cup Races produced for the spectators in San Francisco when viewed from shore in Los Angeles Harbor. The area they raced in is known as "Hurricane Gultch" by the locals. It is famous for its near gale force as well as nearly flat winds. As a result a lot of panache was needed to keep these boats moving at optimum speed without problems in handling. The hulls are amazingly seaworthy and were often compared to a swimming dolphin as they seemed to move effortlessly though often very rough seas.

This was evident to us when we raced in Santa Monica during extreme high winds when the committee boat was nearly sunk. Going to weather we had to pick our way between crests and troughs of the seas. As we turned the weather mark things smoothed out a bit so we broke out some beers and ham sandwiches my wife had made up for us. I was steering with one leg over the tiller while enjoying Annie's lunch offering. The boat tracked like it was on rails as we charged down one gigantic swell after another. We would accelerate off of a crest of a wave and fly down into the trough with spray spitting up to the first spreaders on both sides of the boat! I remember the rainbows they made with a smile even now! One of our crew who had not done much sailing looked at us having lunch and said, "I don't know how you guys can take this so calmly, I'm scared!" I might add that Matt Walsh was known as "The Sorcerer of Hurricane Gultch".
Jay

chas
09-01-2015, 01:14 PM
"The boat tracked like it was on rails as we charged down gigantic swell after swell. We would accelerate off of a crest and fly down into the trough with spray spitting up to the first spreaders on both sides of the boat! I remember the rainbows they made with a smile even now!"

You tell a great story, Jay, thanks for that. I've only sailed sailboards in storm-force conditions, not yet big boats, but it is a special place when you are dialed in. Your pictures and descriptions certainly create further interest regarding this design and your experiences with it, for me. / Jim

RFNK
09-01-2015, 05:16 PM
Ringtails were commonly used on the Australian 18' skiffs in the early 1900s. Your photo of Common Sense is the only instance I think I've seen of a ringtail on any other boat. I'll be looking out for them now! Very nice boat, by the way!

Rick

Jay Greer
09-01-2015, 05:49 PM
Thanks Rick,
Once Common Sense No.1 is back together and sailing, I will post some pictures of her using the ringtail I had made for my own boat. In truth, it is a simple sail to use as it is hoisted in the lee of the main and then sweated up and out on the peak and boom jack yard out haul. The lower jack yard was fitted to a hole in the end of the main boom originally and the yard is made to fit into it like a wine cork. The sail does give an amazing amount of extra drive to the boat, when being used in light airs, as it does not collapse as a non supported headsail will. Since it is only used off the wind it does not strain the rigging much and is not used in heavy airs. Gybing can be a bitch though!
What I am really interested in seeing is how No. 1's new asymmetrical chute will work compared to the old double luff spinnaker. Just imagin this little eighty three year old boat keeping up with a fleet of modern tupperware containers; maybe even running off and hiding from them.
Jay

Jay Greer
09-02-2015, 01:57 PM
For anyone interested in other posts on this forum that have been made concerning the Common Sense boats, they can be found under the listing of "The Rebuild of Common Sense 1". Here too http://forum.woodenboat.com/archive/index.php/t-64876.html
Jay

Jay Greer
09-02-2015, 02:24 PM
This picture has been posted before. But, I am throwing it in for those who might want a glimpse of a sheer shot of "Red Witch", CS 5
Jay
https://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a3da25b3127ccef29dd83d970100000030O00QYsmrNy5bsQ e3nwg/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00107990352120130404232400282.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/The rudder shape was re-designed to place the greatest wetted surface in clean water flow at the bottom of the keel. It seems to work better. The idea was based of a full scale test at the Stevens Tank of the 5.5 meter sloop "Antiope"
The test showed that the rudder shape actually produced greater lift to windward than the original shape did at an angle involving three deg. of weather helm. It was a whim on my part but it seems to make sense. One thing that makes this boat feel both comfortable and bigger than she is, is the large amount of walking space on deck.

RFNK
09-02-2015, 04:38 PM
Magnificent!

Rick

Jay Greer
09-03-2015, 02:20 PM
Thanks Rick,
If it might be of interest, here is a shot of the making of the mast tangs for "Red Witch". The entire mast was made as a hollow ellipse, known as a German Box. This allows a wider fore and aft section to aid in keeping the mast both stiff and controllable. The thinner athwarts ship section was given ample support by the rigging and so could be thinner both on the wall thickness as well as in outer shape. Hence the elliptical cross section. The entire mast is 49 1/2' from butt to truck and weighs in at 160 pounds minus all rigging. It is made of Sitka spruce and is shellacked on the inside. The halyards are internal. They run in PVC tubes and feed through a turning block with three shives in the step through self draining tubes on the deck to jamb cleats ahead of a bottom action winch on the mast. This eliminates the weight of two winches on the mast. The mast is hollow from butt to truck where the only plug is inserted at the chicken head. At the partners the thickness of the walls is increased to add a bit of strength at that point which is a fulcrum.
The actual wall thickness is 5/8" on the sides and 3/4' on the fwd edge. The after end is thicker at 7/8 to allow for sail track screws to get a good grip. There is no blocking in the way of the spreader attachments or at the partners. A large exit hole at the butt insusures good ventilation and drainage for the stick. The PVC tubes are supported in several places by oval plastic foam doughnuts that have vent holes in them as well. Shieve boxes are slanted downward on their bottoms to minimize moisture intrusion. There is also a fixed locking device at the masthead that holds the main halyard using a recirculating ball system which works very well and takes half of the load of the main halyard off of the stick. I thought it would help but have no way to make an assesment other than the fact that it always works very well!
Since there is no blocking at the spreaders, I machined up a set of bronze compession tubes that back up the band that sorrounds the mast as you can see in the picture. This transfers the load of the weather spreader to the lee side of the mast at the band it is capped by. This sets up a loading system that is similar to attempting to crush a raw egg in the hand. Very difficult to do! If you check masts that have failed, they usually break at the spreader attachments. In addition, the spreaders are free swinging and pivot on special large diameter bronze pivot bolts that I machined up out of bronze bar stock. They are rather large in diameter as can be seen in the picture that shows the pivot holes on the tang set up. These bolts are known as "sex bolts" in the trade as they are hollow and threaded on the interior with a capping flange on both ends. They are saftey wired internally to prevent them from coming apart at sea. The spreaders are then free to swing at the angle of loading no matter how or where the mast bucks forward or aft. The load is always automatically aligned to the correct angle for the best support of the mast. In addition, the spreaders have a slight tilted angle of attack built into them so that as the boat heels, forward drive is created. I figured, why not, it is there so why not use it. All in all, the rig works very well and I am very happy with it. The finger straps are made of several layers of thin plate like a leaf spring this insures that no two screws come in the same grain line.
Jay
https://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a5d722b3127cceea532875d79900000030O00QYsmrNy5bsQ e3nwg/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00107990352120150903183231660.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/

Sailor
09-03-2015, 08:23 PM
Ring tails were used by clipper ships as well. I think there's a forumite who sent me pictures of his boat flying one as well. Not sure on that though. It's striking a chord anyway.

Jay Greer
09-04-2015, 01:06 PM
You are correct. Ringtails were set on the spanker leach. This was done on most square riggers.
Jay

Jay Greer
09-04-2015, 01:26 PM
Here is a blurb on No. !, then named "No ka oi" when she was in San Diego.
Scroll down a bit to find her.
Jay
http://kaimaka.com/?paged=2

Ted Hoppe
09-04-2015, 02:02 PM
Here is a blurb on No. !, then named "Nokaoi" when she was in San Diego.
Scroll down a bit to find her.
Jay
http://kaimaka.com/?paged=2

Nice. Would love to see both boats on the same reach.

jsjpd1
09-04-2015, 03:21 PM
How old was Red Witch when you rebuilt her Jay? The use of spruce in here construction (did I imagine that?) is an interesting detail.

jim

Jay Greer
09-04-2015, 08:08 PM
Jim, "Red Witch was forty" years old when I started re-building her. This began because the mast broke due to a poured zinc terminal for one of the upper shrouds letting go. Then I discovered the rot in the deck beams. One thing led to another and I ended up building a new boat over the ballast keel. The shoemaker's child had a place in the back of my shop and I worked on her on weekends and between building jobs of other boats. I actually built three other boats during the time I did "Red Witch". There was rot in more places than you can imagine. Spruce while appropriate for masts, is certainly not good for structural components in a hull!
Right now she is in my shop in Port Townsend waiting for me to do another number to her. This is because she was run down by a power boat while we were becalmed. There was a lot of damage done to the fwd end of the boat that needs to be set right. Nothing I can't do it is just not convenient right now.
Jay

kakistoc
09-05-2015, 07:16 AM
Quite a project, Jay. Sorry to hear about the damage.

Any idea why the original builder decided to use spruce in the hull in the first place?

Dryfeet
09-05-2015, 08:01 AM
Jay, every time in see that picture of your boat, I think, 'wow, that's a boat I could really enjoy". Alas, for my skill set, time availability and the Admiral's preferences, it wouldn't do. But she sure is a sweet boat!

sorry, to hear about the damage, that's a cruel way to be kept from enjoying her, but hopefully it's only temporary.

Jay Greer
09-05-2015, 12:25 PM
No information is available as to why Matt Walsh would have used so much spruce in the construction of my boat other than my guess that he was seeking to keep non essential components ultra light. Still, that does not explain the reason for the spruce floors. Again, these boats were built during the off times for the yard. They may have used what ever wood was available from other jobs. For those of you who may wish to build a Common Sense Sloop, plans will be available through Wooden Boat in 2016. You might start by saving lead for the keel. It weighs in at five thousand pounds.
Jay

RFNK
09-05-2015, 04:46 PM
Sorry to hear of the damage too! A power boat in a calm - good grief!

Rick

Jay Greer
09-07-2015, 12:25 PM
Here is a model of No. 5 "Red Witch" that was made by my father in law, Staff Commodore Richard Lawrence BYC. Dick made the model using the offsets I took off of the boat during her restoration. Everything is as it is on the actual boat other than the fact that the rudder is not the same as the one I designed. All in all,
I was honored that he would do such an involved project on my behalf in exchange for a bottle of scotch!
Jayhttps://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a5d726b3127cceea5a55b3d56700000030O00QYsmrNy5bsQ e3nwg/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00107990352120150907172345744.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/

Jay Greer
09-07-2015, 05:53 PM
Roy Riley was my dad's business partner and owner of "Red Witch" before dad the boat from him. The reason being that Roy had purchased Frank Pedder's "Butcher Boy II" from his widow and needed to get rid of one of his boats. Here in 1949 is Roy and his wife Bab's female cocker spaniel Chico pulling the Witch's dinghy up on the beach on Catalina Island in Cherry cove. Red Witch is in the background. The schooner might be the Hugh Angleman designed "La Volpe". Not sure.
Jay
https://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a5d726b3127cceea5b677ef5ff00000030O00QYsmrNy5bsQ e3nwg/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00107990352120150907223027019.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/

jsjpd1
09-08-2015, 01:22 AM
Great photo, so Red Witch has been in the family for quite some time then.

Jay Greer
09-08-2015, 12:28 PM
Yes, she has been a family member since 1949 even though Roy Riley took me sailing on her before my dad brought her into the family. When she takes me on my final voyage my son, daughter and wife will take me out to the deep blue water where the flying fishes play!
Jay

Jay Greer
09-09-2015, 02:15 PM
Here is Red Witch CS5 back in the days of WWII. Probably 1943. Note the war time big registration numbers on the bow. Everybody had them other than documented vessels. The boat was named "Lady Pat" after Roy Riley's daughter who is the little girl in the cockpit. Roy dressed in white is standing at the helm.
Sailing then was only within the confines of the harbor, Newport Beach CA. The rig of the boat then was 44' from deck to masthead. Three feet of mast extended above the head board of the main due to the stropped rigging. The working jib is set on a boom and has a bronze traveler on deck for self tacking. The boat has a cosmetic gammon knee that I removed later. There are no running backstays, the standing back and jumpers being all that was used for keeping the rig in line. When No. 3 went in the Trans Pac and lost her rig due to a failed standing backstay, the crew found that the turnbuckle had been sawn part way through!
Jay
https://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a5d728b3127cceea468fd5437200000030O00QYsmrNy5bsQ e3nwg/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00107990352120150909191825192.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/