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Ps1474
08-13-2015, 07:55 PM
Greetings!

Long time lurker, first time poster. I am getting ready to start building a Lumber Yard Skiff (I ordered plans Yesterday!) as it seemed to be one of the easiest ,yet capable, boats for a first time builder. The question I now have is do I build the 16 footer or 20' footer? I have a family of 4, soon to be 5, I'm a large man (6'5 300lbs) and built like a football player and I'm wondering if the extra space would be a boon or bust. Also, how stable is the 16 foot skiff?

Thanks!

Salt On The Brain
08-13-2015, 08:40 PM
Go for the 20'. Everybody builds the 16 and we've all been hoping to see a 20.

Ps1474
08-13-2015, 08:56 PM
I can appreciate that! My concerns building the 20 is the added time to build, bigger trailer, bigger motor ( as an aside, I have decide on going tiller for simplicity and extra deck space) and extra cost. Does anyone know how many sheets of plywood the 20 would take? I'm going to use MDO.

martin1302
08-13-2015, 11:38 PM
I can appreciate that! My concerns building the 20 is the added time to build, bigger trailer, bigger motor ( as an aside, I have decide on going tiller for simplicity and extra deck space) and extra cost. Does anyone know how many sheets of plywood the 20 would take? I'm going to use MDO.

For the LYS 20, 11 plywood sheets 3/4 are needed. I guess that the cost are double (incl. motor and trailer) and the needed time one and a half more.
For the LYS 16 and LYSS 16, 4 sheets 1/2 and 3 sheets 3/4 are requestet.

I have build the LYS 16 and can say that the LYS 16 is already a big boat. I have the official authorization for 7 people

Ps1474
08-14-2015, 10:31 AM
Ok. That settles it, 16 LYSS it is. The added lumber cost isn't the major concern but 40hp+ tiller controlled outboards cost much more than their 25-40hp brothers. How stable is the boat when people move around? Thanks All!

martin1302
08-14-2015, 10:47 AM
How stable is the boat when people move around? Thanks All!

Very stable. Three adults can sit on the side deck and you have still at least 6'' free board.

I have only a 8 HP Honda four stroke motor. With two people on board I reach a spead of 20 km/h. With three people on board I stay in the displacement mode and reach around 13 km/h. So I think a 20 HP motor would be already sufficient.

Ps1474
08-14-2015, 03:06 PM
Thanks for the Info. I plan on going with a 30hp motor at this point. The lumber will be here next Friday!

Ps1474
08-14-2015, 06:17 PM
What size screws do I need and how many? I would like to get those ordered as I'm planing on using stainless. Thanks

PNW Crabber
08-14-2015, 08:36 PM
Your plans will call out the specific size and number of screws you will need. I ordered mine from Mcfeely's because I wanted stainless square drive. Good luck with your build.

Willin'
08-14-2015, 08:45 PM
Ok. That settles it, 16 LYSS it is. The added lumber cost isn't the major concern but 40hp+ tiller controlled outboards cost much more than their 25-40hp brothers. How stable is the boat when people move around? Thanks All!

Maybe I'm dense, but can you explain how wheel helmed and remotely controlled outboards in the equivalent power range are cheaper than a simple tiller steerer considering the extra expense of controls and console?

Just curious.

Ps1474
08-14-2015, 10:44 PM
I was just stating that there is a major price jump from 25-30hp (tiller) outboards to 40-50hp (tiller) outboards. But now that you mention it, I can find used remote controlled motors in the 40-50hp range cheaper than tiller controlled motors in the same hp range. I imagine that it's due to the face that 40hp+ outboards w/remote controls are more common in my area (Northern Neck of Virginia).

swoody126
08-15-2015, 08:55 AM
on my 13'6" PORT ARANSAS SKIFF (they call her a 14x4, w/ 14' being the longest piece/gunn'l & 4' being the widest piece/bottom), i use a 40hp Tohatsu 2-stroke which i bought used many years ago

and as i tell folks who are critical YOU DON'T HAVE TO TWIST IT ALL THEY WAY...

finding a nice used outboard may take a bit of time, take the time & save a bundle

IMHO, if absolutes & fine furniture finish were your target, i think you would be building something other than a LYS

horse shoes, hand grenades & atom bombs... close counts

btw, an interwebsite i use for reference is:

http://www.defender.com/categoryBoatsMotors.jsp?path=-1|215570&id=1794283

sw

PNW Crabber
08-15-2015, 10:09 AM
Maybe I'm dense, but can you explain how wheel helmed and remotely controlled outboards in the equivalent power range are cheaper than a simple tiller steerer considering the extra expense of controls and console?

Just curious.

I think he simply meant the 40+ was significantly more whether tiller or remote. I went through the same considerations when I decided to build my 16' and came to the conclusion the 20' in the configuration I wanted would be 2X the 16'.

Either way, it's pretty roomy even with the big console. I hope to have mine in the water by the end of September.

Ps1474
08-15-2015, 10:45 AM
I think he simply meant the 40+ was significantly more whether tiller or remote. I went through the same considerations when I decided to build my 16' and came to the conclusion the 20' in the configuration I wanted would be 2X the 16'.

Either way, it's pretty roomy even with the big console. I hope to have mine in the water by the end of September.


Precisely. The 20' requires more $$ than I'm willing to spend on first boat. While It's not a ceder striped canoe; I want to build it to last, hence the stainless fasteners. I too hope to have mine done by the end of September. That gives me 6 weeks, I Think that's doable.

Ps1474
08-17-2015, 09:02 PM
I'm having a devil of time finding untreated dry 4x4's. Could I use treated 4x4's? Or could I laminate something for the posts?

cankicker
08-17-2015, 09:16 PM
I also couldn't locate any 4x4 untreated post in my area either.So I used regular yellow pine treated post from Home Depot.BUT I glued them with epoxy thickened with wood flour and they were quite dry when I got them and after two years no problem.Also did the stem the same way.
enjoy the huild....

shuffjb
08-18-2015, 06:03 AM
I'm having a devil of time finding untreated dry 4x4's. Could I use treated 4x4's? Or could I laminate something for the posts?

Good deal! Another LYS taking shape!

I had the same problem. Not sure how treated lumber works with all the different glues and finishes. Suggest you call some local lumber yards. Mine had to order it. In a week I got some nice straight clear Douglas fir. You can be cutting out the side panels and doing the butt joints while you wait.

http://s5.postimg.org/krs89ghcn/20150715_093155_sm.jpg

I had avoided lumber yards because they are never open when I am daydreaming about the project. Mine was open 7-3:30 Monday-Friday which took some planning, but they are set up for call in orders.

As for the screws, I found the big box stores carried all the sizes in stainless except the 1-1/4". They are not square drive, but a drive bit is included in each box. Handy if you run out over the weekend (as I have once already).

Also, one more voice on the 16' vs. 20' debate: I also looked at both, liked the extra room of the 20', but I couldn't easily fit it in my garage and the extra cost for materials and motor and trailer convinced me to go with the 16'. As everyone says it is a big boat for 16' especially if you do the tiller configuration.


Here is my build thread: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?194905-LYS-Build-Plans-582 (http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?194905-LYS-Build-Plans-582)

I just flipped the boat over this weekend and am working on interior stuff.

John

Ps1474
08-18-2015, 09:17 AM
Ill have call my supplier and see what they can do. My dad suggested stair newel post. Lowes has them in 3.5x3.5 in red oak and poplar only problem is that they are $75 to $87 each!

potomac
08-18-2015, 10:58 AM
Ill have call my supplier and see what they can do. My dad suggested stair newel post. Lowes has them in 3.5x3.5 in red oak and poplar only problem is that they are $75 to $87 each!

And you don't want to use red oak or poplar.

Ps1474
08-19-2015, 12:29 PM
How does one mark the curve on the plywood? I know this is elementary for y'all but I wanted to ask before I put blade to (expensive) wood.

BrianM
08-19-2015, 02:17 PM
How does one mark the curve on the plywood? I know this is elementary for y'all but I wanted to ask before I put blade to (expensive) wood.


Buy yourself a 10' 1x6 or 1x8 at the big box. You want to make a batten which is a tool, so it's worth getting a piece of clear douglas fir, or clear poplar.

Pick through the stack and find the straightest one you can.

Now, setting up your saw with a ripping blade, cut a couple or three 3/4" x 3/4" strips. You want to join them so you have a 20' batten when you are done. A tapered joint will give you the best strength. You want to keep the wood's flexibility properties similar, so take each strip and figure out which direction is it's natural "curve". You want both halves of the batten joined so the natural curves flow into each other and are not at 90, or 180 degree to each other.


Cut diagonals aprox 6 times the thickness of the material (so your triangle eats up 4.5" of wood (3/4" x 6) of the end of each batten. If you are patient enough, you can even go "shallower" at (3/4" x 8 = 6").. but diminishing returns...

Clamp them together take a look at how straight and "Fair" the lines are of the batten to make sure your mitered diagonals are exact. Recut if needed.

Then just glue up and clamp, but make sure they are dead aligned. THIS IS THE CRITICAL PART

You can now joint together multiple points laid out on the plywood with small nails holding the batten. It will average out any errors and give you a very smooth beautiful line.

Protect that batten and hang it from the ceiling when not in use. It's a staple of boat building.