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View Full Version : West scarffer 875 on a 6 1/2" saw?



dmede
07-16-2015, 01:45 PM
Bought the West 875 scarffer attachment without thinking about the size saw I have. The scarffer is intended to go on a 7 1/4" saw but I have a 6 1/2". Assuming it will still work but cut a shallower scarf. Don't really want to buy a 2nd saw. Anyone here used the scarffer attachment on a smaller saw?

I'm cutting 3/8" ply, I think I'll just have more of a left over ridge to fair off. Looking for confirmation before I put holes in my base plate :p

andrewpatrol
07-16-2015, 06:34 PM
I think you have it right, but if you have an electric plane or belt sander you'll be able to finish it off 90% then the last bit with a hand plane. It's pretty easy following the ply glue lines and use a straightedge to get your scarf surface flat or even with a little hollow. On my scarfs I don't push the feathered edge fully home so that it allows the scarf to finish flat. Means you'll have a little squeeze out but that sand or scrape off flush. Spread out the clamping so you don't push all the glue out of scarf.

dmede
07-16-2015, 06:39 PM
I'll just have to drill the holes and see what I get. I guess it's not going to ruin the base plate. I've done lots of plank and ply scarfing by hand (either all hand plane, or hand plane and belt sander). I was hoping the scarffer attachment would make this a quick one pass cut and hey presto ready to glue, but reading the instructions it seems like even with a full size blade it would only cleanly finish a 1/4" panel. Anything thicker and you have to remove the left over step by hand. Should still be a time saver though. I'll set it up this weekend I guess.

Breakaway
07-16-2015, 07:05 PM
Give us a report, since you will have done it both ways. :)

Kevin

Todd Bradshaw
07-16-2015, 10:53 PM
And don't forget that the scarf cut takes a pretty good amount of power from the saw, because it's like cutting through a hunk of wood thick enough that the blade is totally buried. My old Rockwell circular saw was never the same after cutting a bunch of scarfs in Bruynzeel plywood with my scarffer.

scottmacc
07-17-2015, 12:01 AM
And don't forget that the scarf cut takes a pretty good amount of power from the saw, because it's like cutting through a hunk of wood thick enough that the blade is totally buried. My old Rockwell circular saw was never the same after cutting a bunch of scarfs in Bruynzeel plywood with my scarffer.

that's what I found also; using it on 1/4" ply means a 2" thick cut. I find it much easier to use my electric plane.

willin woodworks
07-17-2015, 06:27 AM
Send it back and get a refund. Go to EBAY and buy a Stanley #5 plane for $60.00. Tune it up and sharpen it real good. Scarph the ply with the plane. Faster, better and so much more satisfying. And now you have a good tool that you can use over and over and will give you years of service.

The Stanley #5 is probably the handiest pane ever made and a real workhorse if tuned and sharpened properly. What will you do with the scarphing jig when you're done?

tom151
07-17-2015, 08:23 AM
scottmacc

Did you make a jig for scarfing ply with your power plane?

TomH

dmede
07-17-2015, 11:36 AM
I have the Stanley Jack plane, I think that's the #5. I have also have the #7 jointer plane and have used both for hand cut scarphs in all kinds of wood (1/4" marine okume to 3/4" red cedar). I actually like the #7 for this much better. Lots of fun and very satisfying to do it by hand... but no way is that faster then a power tool and a jig. If the jig saves me even 25% of the manual time to plane 8:1 scarphs in full or half sheets of 3/8" marine ply (many sheets), it will be well worth it. That's what I'm hoping anyway, I'll let you know. I'm sure I can re sell the jig to another builder, but I'm also sure this is not going to be my last build ; )

I should add, I've done a number of builds now, enjoying the process of hand building and traditional methods very much, and taking my time to finish. This boat is different, I'm building to get on the water. I'm building like I'm being paid to do this. I still want a quality build, but I'm going to pay up where needed to get the right materials, tools, and jigs to help this keep moving along.

dmede
07-17-2015, 11:39 AM
Since we are talking scarf jigs, here's what I eventually came up with on my bandsaw to avoid hand cutting those 3/4" cedar planks:

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-XXovokhF5_o/VCzQnNn0g9I/AAAAAAAADZU/vuN1Ukk9Iyo/w1105-h829-no/IMG_0530.JPG

scottmacc
07-17-2015, 03:24 PM
scottmacc

Did you make a jig for scarfing ply with your power plane?

TomH

No, I didn't use a jig. I was scarfing the 3 layers of 1/4" ply that make up my deck. This isn't a place that requires perfection and was easy just by eye. The seams on the first layer fall on the deck beams. The 2nd layer is sandwiched between the upper and lower layers, and the top layer is covered in dynel. Thickened epoxy filled any flaws. For scarphing something that "matters" or shows like a mast I'll be using a hand plane. It would be too thick for the gougeon scarpher.

scottmacc
07-17-2015, 03:26 PM
Since we are talking scarf jigs, here's what I eventually came up with on my bandsaw to avoid hand cutting those 3/4" cedar planks:



Nice work, I've never been able to get my bandsaw tuned well enough to re-saw wide planks like that.

dmede
07-17-2015, 05:29 PM
If you look closely I'm just sawing off the scarf face, not resawing the whole plank (I used the planer to bring those down to thickness). The jig behind the plank holds it at a roughly 8:1 angle to the bandsaw blade. Push through to take off most of the waste, then touch up with a sander or block plane. It made an awful screeching noise while doing this but worked out pretty well.