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David G
06-07-2015, 06:32 PM
Largest middle-class decline of any state. I'm sure it has nothing to do with Wisconsin being another laboratory for conservative policies. Nope. Couldn't be.

http://www.wpr.org/wisconsin-has-seen-largest-middle-class-decline-any-state-study-finds


Marc Levine — professor of history, economic development and urban studies, and director of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Center for Economic Development (https://www4.uwm.edu/ced/) — attributed the state’s shrinking middle class to the Great Recession, among other factors. He said reversing the trend would require raising the minimum wage and restoring unions, especially in the manufacturing industry.


Wisconsin’s economy relies on manufacturing perhaps more than any other state, said Levine. When manufacturing gets hit hard, he said, Wisconsin gets hit hard too.


Since 2000, Wisconsin has lost about 90,000 — between 18 to 20 percent — of its manufacturing jobs, according to Levine, in part due to free trade agreements and Chinese imports.


Levine said another big part of the story has been "downward occupational skidding." Laid-off manufacturing workers have been displaced into lower-paying jobs in the service industry, and those who have been able to continue working in the manufacturing industry have seen stagnant wages.


"It turns out the manufacturing jobs aren't paying what they use to anymore, and a big chunk of that is because of the de-unionization that has occurred,” said Levine.


In the late 1960s, an estimated 35 percent of Wisconsin’s total workforce and 50 percent of manufacturing workers were unionized, according to Levine. Today, roughly 11 percent of Wisconsin workers are in a union. That figure is 17 percent for
manufacturing workers.


To grow Wisconsin’s middle class, Levine recommends raising the minimum wage to a "living wage" and supporting the ability of workers to engage in collective bargaining.


"In Wisconsin, we've obviously gone the opposite way over the last three or four years," Levine said. "Act 10 took away the collective bargaining rights for public employees, and the rate of unionization in the public sector has declined by about half in the state.

And of course, we just passed a right-to-work law and right-to-work states, the research suggests, tend to have lower wages. Those sorts of policies are pushing us in the wrong direction."

CWSmith
06-07-2015, 07:53 PM
When your ideas don't work, it's because you did not take them far enough...

Hugh Conway
06-07-2015, 07:55 PM
When your ideas don't work, it's because you did not take them far enough...

Reminds me of the First World War and how attacks on entrenched positions failed because of "lack of sufficient attacking spirit"

There are other reason WI failed. One that was pointed out recently was MN encouraged healthcare and education and prospered through the growth in both. Perhaps relevant as Walk-tard attempts to destroy the only thing* in Wisconsin decent (U of W)

Other than New Glarus Brewing, the Wood Canvas Canoe Museum, and the Green Bay Packers.

WI-Tom
06-07-2015, 08:25 PM
Perhaps relevant as Walk-tard attempts to destroy the only thing* in Wisconsin decent (U of W)

Other than New Glarus Brewing, the Wood Canvas Canoe Museum, and the Green Bay Packers.

Oh, there were (WERE) more good things, including a public school system whose students' ACT scores are second in the nation, an excellent set of science-based environmental policies, a long tradition of workers' rights and ecological thinking (think Gaylord Nelson and Earth Day, Aldo Leopold, John Muir, etc), and... well, lots of decent things, actually. Including perhaps the most successful and well-funded retirement system for state employees (which no doubt Wisconsin's Republicans will seek to destroy next).

Tom

Dave Wright
06-07-2015, 08:46 PM
I'm no fan of Walker, but we need to consider lots of factors, and we need to look at Wisconsin AND the other top manufacturing states.

http://www.epi.org/publication/the-manufacturing-footprint-and-the-importance-of-u-s-manufacturing-jobs/#recent-manufacturing-job-losses-nationally-and-by-state

Perhaps real solutions go beyond Walker:



"The top 10 states ranked by total manufacturing employment in 2013 are California (1,251,400 jobs), Texas (871,700 jobs), Ohio (662,100 jobs), Illinois (579,600 jobs), Pennsylvania (563,500 jobs), Michigan (555,300 jobs), Indiana (491,900 jobs), Wisconsin (458,400 jobs), New York (455,100 jobs), and North Carolina (442,500 jobs).

The United States lost 5.7 million manufacturing jobs between March 1998 and 2013. The principal causes of manufacturing job losses were growing trade deficits, especially with China, Mexico, and other low wage nations, and the weak recovery from the Great Recession since 2009.
The Great Recession was unusual because of the length and depth of the manufacturing employment decline. Although nearly 800,000 manufacturing jobs have been added since the employment trough, U.S. manufacturing employment remains depressed. If employment had recovered to the level of the average recovery in the post-World War II era, then an additional 1.2 million manufacturing jobs would have been created through the third quarter of 2014. The weak manufacturing recovery is a product of both international and domestic challenges faced by the manufacturing sector. The U.S. trade deficit in manufactured goods has increased sharply since 2009, which has significantly retarded the growth of manufacturing output and employment since the recession. Currency manipulation by China, Japan, and other countries is one of the leading causes of the growing U.S. trade deficit (Scott 2014b). Weak growth of domestic demand is also a major contributor to the relatively weak manufacturing recovery.

The states hardest hit by manufacturing job loss (measured by share of state employment lost) were North Carolina (9.7 percent, 360,000 jobs lost), Mississippi (8.5 percent, 95,600 jobs), Arkansas (8.1 percent, 89,900 jobs), Rhode Island (7.9 percent, 36,000 jobs), Michigan (7.6 percent, 340,000 jobs), Tennessee (7.3 percent, 191,700 jobs), Ohio (6.8 percent, 368,500 jobs), South Carolina (6.6 percent, 117,100 jobs), New Hampshire (6.6 percent, 38,700 jobs), and Alabama (6.1 percent, 114,600 jobs).
Eight states have lost more than 200,000 manufacturing jobs since 1998: California (604,800 jobs lost, 4.5 percent), Ohio (368,500 jobs, 6.8 percent), North Carolina (360,000 jobs, 9.7 percent), New York (342,500 jobs, 4.2 percent), Michigan (340,000 jobs, 7.6 percent), Illinois (330,500 jobs, 5.6 percent), Pennsylvania (314,000 jobs, 5.7 percent), and Texas (200,400 jobs, 2.3 percent).
The U.S. goods trade deficit is likely to exceed $730 billion in 2014 (U.S. Census Bureau 2014b and author’s analysis). Elimination of currency manipulation by a group of about 20 countries, with China as the linchpin, could reduce the U.S. trade deficit by between $200 and $500 billion within three years. This would increase U.S. GDP by between 2.0 percent and 4.9 percent, and create between 2.3 million and 5.8 million U.S. jobs. Approximately 40 percent of the jobs gained would be in manufacturing, which would gain between 891,500 and 2.3 million jobs (Scott 2014b)."

ccmanuals
06-07-2015, 08:50 PM
Wisconsin would be doing great like Texas if only they had oil and gas. Just sayin.

Memphis Mike
06-07-2015, 08:56 PM
Prints too small.

David G
06-07-2015, 09:00 PM
I'm no fan of Walker, but we need to consider lots of factors, and we need to look at Wisconsin AND the other top manufacturing states.

http://www.epi.org/publication/the-manufacturing-footprint-and-the-importance-of-u-s-manufacturing-jobs/#recent-manufacturing-job-losses-nationally-and-by-state

Perhaps real solutions go beyond Walker:



"The top 10 states ranked by total manufacturing employment in 2013 are California (1,251,400 jobs), Texas (871,700 jobs), Ohio (662,100 jobs), Illinois (579,600 jobs), Pennsylvania (563,500 jobs), Michigan (555,300 jobs), Indiana (491,900 jobs), Wisconsin (458,400 jobs), New York (455,100 jobs), and North Carolina (442,500 jobs).

The United States lost 5.7 million manufacturing jobs between March 1998 and 2013. The principal causes of manufacturing job losses were growing trade deficits, especially with China, Mexico, and other low wage nations, and the weak recovery from the Great Recession since 2009.
The Great Recession was unusual because of the length and depth of the manufacturing employment decline. Although nearly 800,000 manufacturing jobs have been added since the employment trough, U.S. manufacturing employment remains depressed. If employment had recovered to the level of the average recovery in the post-World War II era, then an additional 1.2 million manufacturing jobs would have been created through the third quarter of 2014. The weak manufacturing recovery is a product of both international and domestic challenges faced by the manufacturing sector. The U.S. trade deficit in manufactured goods has increased sharply since 2009, which has significantly retarded the growth of manufacturing output and employment since the recession. Currency manipulation by China, Japan, and other countries is one of the leading causes of the growing U.S. trade deficit (Scott 2014b). Weak growth of domestic demand is also a major contributor to the relatively weak manufacturing recovery.

The states hardest hit by manufacturing job loss (measured by share of state employment lost) were North Carolina (9.7 percent, 360,000 jobs lost), Mississippi (8.5 percent, 95,600 jobs), Arkansas (8.1 percent, 89,900 jobs), Rhode Island (7.9 percent, 36,000 jobs), Michigan (7.6 percent, 340,000 jobs), Tennessee (7.3 percent, 191,700 jobs), Ohio (6.8 percent, 368,500 jobs), South Carolina (6.6 percent, 117,100 jobs), New Hampshire (6.6 percent, 38,700 jobs), and Alabama (6.1 percent, 114,600 jobs).
Eight states have lost more than 200,000 manufacturing jobs since 1998: California (604,800 jobs lost, 4.5 percent), Ohio (368,500 jobs, 6.8 percent), North Carolina (360,000 jobs, 9.7 percent), New York (342,500 jobs, 4.2 percent), Michigan (340,000 jobs, 7.6 percent), Illinois (330,500 jobs, 5.6 percent), Pennsylvania (314,000 jobs, 5.7 percent), and Texas (200,400 jobs, 2.3 percent).
The U.S. goods trade deficit is likely to exceed $730 billion in 2014 (U.S. Census Bureau 2014b and author’s analysis). Elimination of currency manipulation by a group of about 20 countries, with China as the linchpin, could reduce the U.S. trade deficit by between $200 and $500 billion within three years. This would increase U.S. GDP by between 2.0 percent and 4.9 percent, and create between 2.3 million and 5.8 million U.S. jobs. Approximately 40 percent of the jobs gained would be in manufacturing, which would gain between 891,500 and 2.3 million jobs (Scott 2014b)."


Yes... that's a key component.

And... it's covered in the article

And... the primary drop in mfg. jobs was during the Great Recession. WHY did the GR come about? That's right... ill-considered push too far toward the laissez-faire end of things by ideologically blinded, history-ignorant fools (aka Republicans).

Dave Wright
06-07-2015, 09:20 PM
Yes... that's a key component.

And... it's covered in the article

.

Unfortunately your article was parochial and tended to suggest that Wisconsin's problems were unique, for example:

"Wisconsin’s economy relies on manufacturing perhaps more than any other state, said Levine."

You will note in the article I referenced that seven states have more manufacturing jobs than Wisconsin and Wisconsin does not appear in the long list of states with h highest percentage of manufacturing job losses. I'd hate for any reader to miss the overall picture.

Furthermore, the article I referenced goes straight to the underlying problem for ALL states.

I understand that you have an axe to grind, and I don't disagree with your take on Walker's negative impact on Wisconsin. But you run the risk of deceiving yourself and others in your ardor, and you may lose sight of the fundamental issue:

"Currency manipulation by China, Japan, and other countries is one of the leading causes of the growing U.S. trade deficit (Scott 2014b). Weak growth of domestic demand is also a major contributor to the relatively weak manufacturing recovery."

David G
06-07-2015, 09:27 PM
Unfortunately your article was parochial and tended to suggest that Wisconsin's problems were unique, for example:

"Wisconsin’s economy relies on manufacturing perhaps more than any other state, said Levine."

You will note in the article I referenced that seven states have more manufacturing jobs than Wisconsin and Wisconsin does not appear in the long list of states with h highest percentage of manufacturing job losses. I'd hate for any reader to miss the overall picture.

Furthermore, the article I referenced goes straight to the underlying problem for ALL states.

I understand that you have an axe to grind, and I don't disagree with your take on Walker's negative impact on Wisconsin. But you run the risk of deceiving yourself and others in your ardor, and you may lose sight of the fundamental issue:

"Currency manipulation by China, Japan, and other countries is one of the leading causes of the growing U.S. trade deficit (Scott 2014b). Weak growth of domestic demand is also a major contributor to the relatively weak manufacturing recovery."

Agreed. The article was written by a local economic development academic - with an unstated level of expertise in international issues. And, yes, no state's situation can be taken totally in a vacuum. Good to understand all that - but it doesn't take away from the thrust of the article. As another thread suggests - compare similar states, which adopted sharply different policies - WITHIN THE SAME LARGER MILIEU - and see what the results are. Still not an absolutely precise, down to the last detail, comparison... but - as Keith has mentioned several times - quite instructive and highly germane.

WI-Tom
06-07-2015, 09:46 PM
I understand that you have an axe to grind, and I don't disagree with your take on Walker's negative impact on Wisconsin. But you run the risk of deceiving yourself and others in your ardor, and you may lose sight of the fundamental issue:

"Currency manipulation by China, Japan, and other countries is one of the leading causes of the growing U.S. trade deficit (Scott 2014b). Weak growth of domestic demand is also a major contributor to the relatively weak manufacturing recovery."

In my opinion, the portion of your quote I bolded is the fundamental issue--because, thanks to a systematic and nation-wide set of Republican policies, domestic demand is lower because fewer people can afford to buy anything extra. We can't easily control what China does. We could (in theory) change what our government does to its own citizens.

So, no, the problem is not unique to Wisconsin. But it is uniquely linked to Republican policies--THAT, I think, is the fundamental issue here. You risk deluding yourself and others if you dismiss that too easily.

Tom

Dave Wright
06-07-2015, 10:07 PM
So, no, the problem is not unique to Wisconsin. But it is uniquely linked to Republican policies--THAT, I think, is the fundamental issue here. You risk deluding yourself and others if you dismiss that too easily.

Tom

I don't dismiss it. If I had wanted to make the point DavidG is trying to make, I would have used "that fearless sifting and winnowing" that I learned at UW Madison and posted this article by the same author, Prof Marc Levine where he specifically addresses Walker, jobs, and the economy:

http://www.jsonline.com/news/opinion/wisconsins-economy-is-nowhere-near-the-head-of-the-class-b99469883z1-297884251.html