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Rum_Pirate
06-03-2015, 07:54 AM
Yet another 'factoid' received on the email circuit.

I wonder how much of this is accurate?


How Big is Walmart?

This Will boggle your mind! And Should scare you as well!

1. At Wal-Mart, Americans spend @$36,000,000 every hour of every day.

2. This works out to $20,928 profit every minute!

3. Wal-Mart will sell more from January 1 to St. Patrick's Day (March 17th) than Target sells all year.

4. Wal-Mart is bigger than Home Depot + Kroger + Target + Sears +Costco + K-Mart combined.

5. Wal-Mart employs 1.6 million people and is the largest private employer, and most can't speak English.

6. Wal-Mart is the largest company in the history of the world.

7. Wal-Mart now sells more food than Kroger Safeway combined, keep in mind they did this in only 15 years.

8. During this same period, 31 Supermarket chains sought bankruptcy.

9. Wal-Mart now sells more food than any other store in the world.

10. Wal-Mart has approx 3,900 stores in the USA of which 1,906 are Super Centers; this is 1,000 more than it had 5 years ago.

11. This year, 7.2 billion different purchasing experiences will occur at a Wal-Mart store. (Earth's population is approximately 6.5 billion).

12. 90% of all Americans live within 15 miles of a Wal-Mart.

13. The value of product for Wal-Mart passing through the port of San Diego each year is a larger sum than 93% of ALL countries Gross National Product (GNP).....and that is only ONE port... one way Thatís how Wal-Mart gets it's stuff.

14. Of the 1.6 million employees, only 1.2% make a living above the poverty level.

15. Wal-Mart's head office is located and centralized in Bentonville. Due to this fact, there are more millionaires per square mile there than any place on Earth.

16. The official U.S. Government position is that Wal-Mart's prices are no lower than anyone else's when compared to a typical families weekly purchases.
That's the view of the statisticians at the Bureau Of Labor Statistics (BLS) responsible for calculating the Consumer Price Index (CPI).

17. 92% of everything Wal-Mart sells, comes from China. Another 4% comes from Chinese owned companies in the U.S. or in 3rd world Countries.

18. Wal-Mart and MOST large companies, take out life insurance on its employees, without their knowing. If an employee dies, ALL the insurance moneys go to the companies.
(i.e. An employee making $18,000 per year, dies, and the company might make as much as $1 million. Most often these moneys, coming from what is commonly referred to as
"Dead Peasant Life Insurance Policies", is paid out to executives as bonuses. A common practice, unknown by the average consumer).

19. Wal-Mart now averages a "profit" (not sales) of $36 billion per year.

20. Let Wal-Mart bail out Wall Street. If not, consider shopping someplace else.


If we closed all the Wal-Mart stores.. China and America both may go bankrupt?

Duncan Gibbs
06-03-2015, 08:51 AM
Now look up 'the hour-glass economy' and ask yourself who is knifing the middle class in the back.

John of Phoenix
06-03-2015, 10:07 AM
http://www.snopes.com/politics/business/bigwalmart.asp

This originated in 2008 and is classified as "Mostly True", meaning... the figures are even larger now, meaning... this "mind boggling, scary" mass email had no effect at all.

Nicholas Scheuer
06-03-2015, 11:06 AM
If every Walmart in the world blew up in a cloud of smoke I would not miss them. I don't know anybody who works in those stores, either.

Chris Smith porter maine
06-03-2015, 12:43 PM
12. 90% of all Americans live within 15 miles of a Wal-Mart.

I'm finally one of the 10%:D

Hugh Conway
06-03-2015, 12:49 PM
I don't know anybody who works in those stores, either.

Is that a point of pride? :confused:

I wonder if this isn't part of the reason for the willfull optimism on this forum that technology won't disrupt employment. Most of those Walmart (and Target, Home Depot, pick a big box they are mostly the same) workers could be replaced with automation today; but because people don't know them they get to ignore millions of US workers. Walmart alone is 1% of the US workforce; for most of the workers NOW they aren't economically valuable enough to exist without subsidy. Whyever does anyone think this will get better?

I'd add - I don't think Walmart is any worse than Amazon.com. In some ways I'd rather buy from Walmart; at least some of the money is staying "local" (tax revenue if nothing else)

S.V. Airlie
06-03-2015, 12:52 PM
12. 90% of all Americans live within 15 miles of a Wal-Mart.

I'm finally one of the 10%:D
I actually live 35.3 miles from a Walmart.:)

DMillet
06-03-2015, 12:57 PM
12. 90% of all Americans live within 15 miles of a Wal-Mart.

I'm finally one of the 10%:D


Me too. One of the things I'm happiest about in living here in fact.

DMillet
06-03-2015, 01:06 PM
Is that a point of pride? :confused:

I wonder if this isn't part of the reason for the willfull optimism on this forum that technology won't disrupt employment. Most of those Walmart (and Target, Home Depot, pick a big box they are mostly the same) workers could be replaced with automation today; but because people don't know them they get to ignore millions of US workers. Walmart alone is 1% of the US workforce; for most of the workers NOW they aren't economically valuable enough to exist without subsidy. Whyever does anyone think this will get better?

I'd add - I don't think Walmart is any worse than Amazon.com. In some ways I'd rather buy from Walmart; at least some of the money is staying "local" (tax revenue if nothing else)

I work in tech and I have no fantasies about it not disrupting employment. Fact is, the only way most low level (and eventually, almost all) jobs avoid outsourcing to technology is to pass laws making it cost prohibitive. That's not going to happen in the US anytime soon. We can't even pass laws that make it cost prohibitive to outsource well paying jobs to other countries. When the workers in other countries start demanding better pay the jobs will be moved from there and eventually they'll all be automated. I'd like to say I'll be dead by then but since my company just outsourced all network operations, all server operations and all development, I expect I'll be on the chopping block before long too.

Garret
06-03-2015, 03:57 PM
I work in tech and I have no fantasies about it not disrupting employment. Fact is, the only way most low level (and eventually, almost all) jobs avoid outsourcing to technology is to pass laws making it cost prohibitive. That's not going to happen in the US anytime soon. We can't even pass laws that make it cost prohibitive to outsource well paying jobs to other countries. When the workers in other countries start demanding better pay the jobs will be moved from there and eventually they'll all be automated. I'd like to say I'll be dead by then but since my company just outsourced all network operations, all server operations and all development, I expect I'll be on the chopping block before long too.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/04/us/last-task-after-layoff-at-disney-train-foreign-replacements.html?smid=fb-nytimes&smtyp=cur&_r=0

Paul Pless
06-03-2015, 04:06 PM
Can you imagine WM taking over the auto retail industry?

How about real estate sales?

What else? Air travel,vacation rentals,how about electric generation?
They have the profits to do damn near anything they want and bankrupt
even more businesses.

Surprised they haven't moved into banking and financial services in a big way already . . .

DMillet
06-03-2015, 04:20 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/04/us/last-task-after-layoff-at-disney-train-foreign-replacements.html?smid=fb-nytimes&smtyp=cur&_r=0

Not who I work for, but at least one of the companies in that article is also one of our vendors. It's been nine months of intense pain at the front line but management is committed to this course of action (this is the third time we've done it in the last 15 years, both previous attempts were aborted after a couple of years). I've lost a bunch of good friends to outsourcing. Every one of them is glad they're gone now. I'm not exactly eagerly seeking the experience but I can't say I'm really dreading it either.

What I will say is it's soured me on all big business. I no longer actively support any big business if there's any alternative available.

Nicholas Scheuer
06-03-2015, 04:22 PM
I know neither people who work there, nor people who shop there. Yes, that is a point of pride. I do not know people who get photographed (and then posted on the internet) as specimens of "seen at Walmart".

Garret
06-03-2015, 05:04 PM
Not who I work for, but at least one of the companies in that article is also one of our vendors. It's been nine months of intense pain at the front line but management is committed to this course of action (this is the third time we've done it in the last 15 years, both previous attempts were aborted after a couple of years). I've lost a bunch of good friends to outsourcing. Every one of them is glad they're gone now. I'm not exactly eagerly seeking the experience but I can't say I'm really dreading it either.

What I will say is it's soured me on all big business. I no longer actively support any big business if there's any alternative available.

The stories like this blow me away. Seems that companies cannot learn from mistakes & outsourcing overseas most always proves to be a mistake. Now outsourcing to a consultant like me is a whole 'nother kettle o' fish,,, ;)

Bob Adams
06-03-2015, 05:20 PM
Is Phillip banned?

Paul Pless
06-03-2015, 05:29 PM
Nope, he's actually been pretty mellow of late. I'm even thinking of taking him off my fake ignore list.

Bob Adams
06-03-2015, 05:47 PM
Must be on Prozac to ignore this thread!

S.V. Airlie
06-03-2015, 05:49 PM
Taking a nap probably! He'll get on around 3:30AM.

Sky Blue
06-03-2015, 06:34 PM
Can one still say that Wal-Mart fills a "niche?" Not too many places one can pick up sanitary napkins, half-rack of Bud, box of shells, quart of oil, pound of thinly-sliced turkey and a kwikfish (http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=photo+of+kwikfish&qpvt=photo+of+kwikfish&qpvt=photo+of+kwikfish&FORM=IGRE), all while a new set of tires is being installed on your truck.

I spent the Winter of 1988 in Breckenridge and there is a Wal-Mart in nearby Frisco. All the rippers from NY and NE absolutely LOVED it, couldn't get enough of the place.

Apparently the Wal-Mart concept had not yet penetrated the East. Sounds like that has changed.

bobbys
06-03-2015, 08:44 PM
Last time I wuz in a Wal mart I bought 4 shirts for 2 .50 each, 2 long sleeved pull overs for 3 .00 each..

OY VEY such a deal!

Duncan Gibbs
06-03-2015, 09:34 PM
Can one still say that Wal-Mart fills a "niche?" Not too many places one can pick up sanitary napkins, half-rack of Bud, box of shells, quart of oil, pound of thinly-sliced turkey and a kwikfish (http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=photo+of+kwikfish&qpvt=photo+of+kwikfish&qpvt=photo+of+kwikfish&FORM=IGRE), all while a new set of tires is being installed on your truck.

I spent the Winter of 1988 in Breckenridge and there is a Wal-Mart in nearby Frisco. All the rippers from NY and NE absolutely LOVED it, couldn't get enough of the place.

Apparently the Wal-Mart concept had not yet penetrated the East. Sounds like that has changed.
The Wal-Mart "concept" is all about making as many people poorer as possible and then selling them cheap stuff that they used to make and sell for a living wage. Stuff that is now made by virtually indentured labour in places like China, Indonesia and Bangladesh, thereby making outfits such as Wal-Mart vast profits, further squeezing the middle class downward. Most modern poverty isn't an accident, nor a product of choice, lack of effort, or lack of skill. It's the work of market manipulation by those that own the lion's share of the means of production.

Happy reading! (https://www.google.com.au/#q=the+hourglass+economy)

Sky Blue
06-03-2015, 10:14 PM
Wal-Mart is a retailer and so to my knowledge does not own the production means in a given region, but yes, Duncan, I am well aware of the challenges presented by a business model like Wal-Mart, which certainly is not the only one of its kind. Also, Wal-Mart sells all kinds of things made in all kinds of places, not all of it "cheap" by any means but certainly cheaper than it can be obtained elsewhere (the secret of their success). The Wal-Mart issue is what it is but is also systemic. That is, if Wal-Mart suddenly disappeared tomorrow, all would not be well, one supposes, as other entities would simply fill in the vacated space and do it themselves. Such are the vagaries of the modern, globalized economy.

Waddie
06-03-2015, 11:44 PM
I remember before Home Depot that I had to go to one place for roofing, another for lumber, and another for hardware. Now I can get most all of what I need at one place. Before Walmart I had to go all over town to get what was on "the list". Now I can get most of it at Walmart and the groceries, too. How is Walmart different than any other chain store, except for size? And it's chain stores that are replacing all those mom and pop stores, not necessarily Walmart. Restaurant chains have all but eliminated family owned restaurants. The only reason most of the workers at all of these places haven't been replaced with automation is they're still cost effective. Raise the minimum wage to $15 per hour nation-wide and you'll see automation like never before.

regards,
Waddie

LeeG
06-03-2015, 11:58 PM
Yet another 'factoid' received on the email circuit.

I wonder how much of this is accurate?

This is progress, now the next step is asking why you have an email circuit.

Duncan Gibbs
06-04-2015, 02:09 AM
Wal-Mart is a retailer and so to my knowledge does not own the production means in a given region, but yes, Duncan, I am well aware of the challenges presented by a business model like Wal-Mart, which certainly is not the only one of its kind.
Owning and controlling supply chains are two separate issues. Our major supermarkets certainly don't own the dairies they buy their milk from, but they certainly control them via their weighted purchasing power and insistence on exclusive supply contracts. Wal-Mart are but one business, albeit the largest, that is the engine room of the 'bottom half' of the hourglass economy where money is made in vast amounts for the top half of the hourglass economy by employing people at low wages and selling low/lower priced stuff to those same people on low wages in large aggregates.


Also, Wal-Mart sells all kinds of things made in all kinds of places, not all of it "cheap" by any means but certainly cheaper than it can be obtained elsewhere (the secret of their success).
Price, or at least price alone, is not "the secret of their success." Creating and controlling all aspects of their market is the secret of their success.


The Wal-Mart issue is what it is but is also systemic. That is, if Wal-Mart suddenly disappeared tomorrow, all would not be well, one supposes, as other entities would simply fill in the vacated space and do it themselves. Such are the vagaries of the modern, globalized economy.
There is nothing remotely vague about anything Wal-Mart, or their ilk do. If Wal-Mart "suddenly disappeared tomorrow" you'd bet that either political revolution or economic depression has occurred and the conditions favourable for such a business model have evaporated.


I remember before Home Depot that I had to go to one place for roofing, another for lumber, and another for hardware. Now I can get most all of what I need at one place. Before Walmart I had to go all over town to get what was on "the list". Now I can get most of it at Walmart and the groceries, too.
Actually the product variety that smaller, family owned stores used to stock has all but evaporated with the onset of the big-box business model. Sure, you might not need to use as much foot leather but to purchase products that used to be common in many stores now requires a significant effort and usually a much higher price, even though such an item might be common and cheap further back nearer the beginning the supply chain.


How is Walmart different than any other chain store, except for size? And it's chain stores that are replacing all those mom and pop stores, not necessarily Walmart. Restaurant chains have all but eliminated family owned restaurants.
Where did I suggest that Wal-Mart is the only chain store?


The only reason most of the workers at all of these places haven't been replaced with automation is they're still cost effective. Raise the minimum wage to $15 per hour nation-wide and you'll see automation like never before.
No, you're wrong. The only reason is that the big-box chain stores haven't switched to full automation is that they still recognise they need a market to sell things to, and that market needs money to spend on stuff they sell. Ever hear of a concept called the company town? I suggest you read some of the links in the google link I posted.

Waddie
06-04-2015, 02:36 AM
Duncan Gibbs; Price, or at least price alone, is not "the secret of their success." Creating and controlling all aspects of their market is the secret of their success.

They beat the competition by setting up their own distribution warehouses. The first thing Walmart does in a new region, before ever building a store (which they don't own), is to build a distribution warehouse.

They are also hardnose negotiators when it comes to product. Half a cent per unit is a big deal to them. They are also cheaper than any mom and pop ever was. And they stock items, where miom and pop had to order them for me. But what's killing mom and pop isn't just Walmart, it's online shopping. I go into any brick and mortar, click my phone on a product, and I get the lowest price; usually online.

They have the best tracking system and shipping system of any retailer. They move perishable products like fruit faster than anybody.

Say what you want, they are very efficient for a retail operation.

regards,
Waddie

Bob Adams
06-04-2015, 05:50 AM
Wal-Mart is a retailer and so to my knowledge does not own the production means in a given region

They don't need to own the production means, they control it. If the suppliers (I used to work for one) do not meet their demands, Wal Mart threatens to take it's business elsewhere. Unfortunately, they are so big most companies cannot afford to lose them. Therefore they comply, whatever it takes.

Bob Adams
06-04-2015, 05:52 AM
The Wal-Mart "concept" is all about making as many people poorer as possible and then selling them cheap stuff that they used to make and sell for a living wage. Stuff that is now made by virtually indentured labour in places like China, Indonesia and Bangladesh, thereby making outfits such as Wal-Mart vast profits, further squeezing the middle class downward. Most modern poverty isn't an accident, nor a product of choice, lack of effort, or lack of skill. It's the work of market manipulation by those that own the lion's share of the means of production.

Happy reading! (https://www.google.com.au/#q=the+hourglass+economy)

Exactly.

Paul Pless
06-04-2015, 06:26 AM
I remember before Home Depot that I had to go to one place for roofing, another for lumber, and another for hardware.And the roofing, and the lumber, and most certainly the hardware were all of higher quality and of greater variety pre big box store. . .

Garret
06-04-2015, 12:12 PM
I go into any brick and mortar, click my phone on a product, and I get the lowest price; usually online.

That is what is killing local stores: customers that use the store to look at the item & then buy it elsewhere. What I do instead is to check online & if markedly less (IOW if it's 2% cheaper online, I ignore it, if 20% then no) I talk to the store & tell them the online price. If they want to get close, fine, if not, I then buy online - after telling them so.

Recently, while shopping for lighting products for the house, I found a local place that was less (not a lot - but still less) than online from the getgo. I've also seen signs saying "Find it cheaper elsewhere? We'll match/beat it").

I prefer giving the local stores a chance. Some take me up on it, some don't. Also - service needs to be figured in. If I can return to the store instead of calling an 800 #, waiting 20 min. for an RMA & then paying shipping back - that's worth a lot to me.

Rum_Pirate
06-04-2015, 01:12 PM
That is what is killing local stores: customers that use the store to look at the item & then buy it elsewhere. What I do instead is to check online & if markedly less (IOW if it's 2% cheaper online, I ignore it, if 20% then no) I talk to the store & tell them the online price. If they want to get close, fine, if not, I then buy online - after telling them so.

Recently, while shopping for lighting products for the house, I found a local place that was less (not a lot - but still less) than online from the getgo. I've also seen signs saying "Find it cheaper elsewhere? We'll match/beat it").

I prefer giving the local stores a chance. Some take me up on it, some don't. Also - service needs to be figured in. If I can return to the store instead of calling an 800 #, waiting 20 min. for an RMA & then paying shipping back - that's worth a lot to me.


I suspect that some people forget/overlook to include the shipping etc costs.

Captain Intrepid
06-04-2015, 01:21 PM
They don't need to own the production means, they control it. If the suppliers (I used to work for one) do not meet their demands, Wal Mart threatens to take it's business elsewhere. Unfortunately, they are so big most companies cannot afford to lose them. Therefore they comply, whatever it takes.

They comply, even if it bankrupts them.

http://www.fastcompany.com/47593/wal-mart-you-dont-know


A gallon-sized jar of whole pickles is something to behold. The jar is the size of a small aquarium. The fat green pickles, floating in swampy juice, look reptilian, their shapes exaggerated by the glass. It weighs 12 pounds, too big to carry with one hand. The gallon jar of pickles is a display of abundance and excess; it is entrancing, and also vaguely unsettling. This is the product that Wal-Mart fell in love with: Vlasic's gallon jar of pickles.Wal-Mart priced it at $2.97—a year's supply of pickles for less than $3! "They were using it as a 'statement' item," says Pat Hunn, who calls himself the "mad scientist" of Vlasic's gallon jar. "Wal-Mart was putting it before consumers, saying, This represents what Wal-Mart's about. You can buy a stinkin' gallon of pickles for $2.97. And it's the nation's number-one brand."
Therein lies the basic conundrum of doing business with the world's largest retailer. By selling a gallon of kosher dills for less than most grocers sell a quart, Wal-Mart may have provided a ser-vice for its customers. But what did it do for Vlasic? The pickle maker had spent decades convincing customers that they should pay a premium for its brand. Now Wal-Mart was practically giving them away. And the fevered buying spree that resulted distorted every aspect of Vlasic's operations, from farm field to factory to financial statement.

bobbys
06-04-2015, 01:52 PM
Another side of the coin is with a apoligie to david is if I should go to Astoria OR there is no place to park as the employees park right in front of the store, If you are not a local they ignore you, Whatever you want they almost always say they have to order it for you, The prices are 30percent higher, they themselves go to Portland to shop, They hire contractors out of the area , There are derelict buildings in town because the rich local family is crazy and lets them rot, The stores are coffee shops ,Finnish goods, tattoo shops, Dive bars,, No place to buy clothes.
Why not go to the big box stores outside of town.