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Nicholas Carey
02-19-2004, 04:54 PM
Check out this centu ry-old, 1000 pound workbench (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2595531636&category=4123&sspagename=STRK%3AMEBWA%3AIT&rd=1) on eBay

http://i24.ebayimg.com/02/i/01/52/26/20_1_sb.JPG

Nicholas Carey
02-19-2004, 04:54 PM
Check out this centu ry-old, 1000 pound workbench (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2595531636&category=4123&sspagename=STRK%3AMEBWA%3AIT&rd=1) on eBay

http://i24.ebayimg.com/02/i/01/52/26/20_1_sb.JPG

Nicholas Carey
02-19-2004, 04:54 PM
Check out this centu ry-old, 1000 pound workbench (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2595531636&category=4123&sspagename=STRK%3AMEBWA%3AIT&rd=1) on eBay

http://i24.ebayimg.com/02/i/01/52/26/20_1_sb.JPG

TomFF
02-19-2004, 07:27 PM
Beautiful antique but I don't think you can really call it a work bench. At $4,750 it's a ....?

TomFF
02-19-2004, 07:27 PM
Beautiful antique but I don't think you can really call it a work bench. At $4,750 it's a ....?

TomFF
02-19-2004, 07:27 PM
Beautiful antique but I don't think you can really call it a work bench. At $4,750 it's a ....?

Bob Smalser
02-20-2004, 08:40 AM
Pretty bench all right, but a hundred years old my kiester....I doubt it, but perhaps the basic bench is that old...but those frame and panels were done with a hand-held router....and by somebody only so-so at it....not just the rounded interior rail-stile corners, but look at the dips just beyond the corners where the bit grabbed and overran its pilot or flexed its shank.

Use sharp, half-inch shank bits and go slower for this type of work.

http://i5.ebayimg.com/02/i/01/52/2d/ed_3.JPG

Wide-spread hand-held routers are a post-WWII phenom, and didn't come into their own until the 1970's, which'd be my guess as to when this bench was made.

These from the early '80's aren't perfect either...but they are better:

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/2594265/46266576.jpg

Edited to add...a different opinion from a friend, although it doesn't change mine:


RL Carter was making a line of routers and router accessories in the 1930's.
They were bought by the Stanley Electric Tool Division and Stanley routers were the cats meow through the war years and even when I started in the early '60's, my hand out sheet shows a Stanley 1 2/3 HP router for use in our portable router table project.

I have RL Carter/Stanley catalogs.
Work like that could have be done on a shaper with the proper knives and jigs.
The basic bench could very well be over 100 years old. It is a copy of the Shaker bench at the Fruitlands Museum, now called something else and the original is featured on the cover of the Workbench Book put out by Taunton Press.


[ 02-20-2004, 01:30 PM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Bob Smalser
02-20-2004, 08:40 AM
Pretty bench all right, but a hundred years old my kiester....I doubt it, but perhaps the basic bench is that old...but those frame and panels were done with a hand-held router....and by somebody only so-so at it....not just the rounded interior rail-stile corners, but look at the dips just beyond the corners where the bit grabbed and overran its pilot or flexed its shank.

Use sharp, half-inch shank bits and go slower for this type of work.

http://i5.ebayimg.com/02/i/01/52/2d/ed_3.JPG

Wide-spread hand-held routers are a post-WWII phenom, and didn't come into their own until the 1970's, which'd be my guess as to when this bench was made.

These from the early '80's aren't perfect either...but they are better:

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/2594265/46266576.jpg

Edited to add...a different opinion from a friend, although it doesn't change mine:


RL Carter was making a line of routers and router accessories in the 1930's.
They were bought by the Stanley Electric Tool Division and Stanley routers were the cats meow through the war years and even when I started in the early '60's, my hand out sheet shows a Stanley 1 2/3 HP router for use in our portable router table project.

I have RL Carter/Stanley catalogs.
Work like that could have be done on a shaper with the proper knives and jigs.
The basic bench could very well be over 100 years old. It is a copy of the Shaker bench at the Fruitlands Museum, now called something else and the original is featured on the cover of the Workbench Book put out by Taunton Press.


[ 02-20-2004, 01:30 PM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Bob Smalser
02-20-2004, 08:40 AM
Pretty bench all right, but a hundred years old my kiester....I doubt it, but perhaps the basic bench is that old...but those frame and panels were done with a hand-held router....and by somebody only so-so at it....not just the rounded interior rail-stile corners, but look at the dips just beyond the corners where the bit grabbed and overran its pilot or flexed its shank.

Use sharp, half-inch shank bits and go slower for this type of work.

http://i5.ebayimg.com/02/i/01/52/2d/ed_3.JPG

Wide-spread hand-held routers are a post-WWII phenom, and didn't come into their own until the 1970's, which'd be my guess as to when this bench was made.

These from the early '80's aren't perfect either...but they are better:

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/2594265/46266576.jpg

Edited to add...a different opinion from a friend, although it doesn't change mine:


RL Carter was making a line of routers and router accessories in the 1930's.
They were bought by the Stanley Electric Tool Division and Stanley routers were the cats meow through the war years and even when I started in the early '60's, my hand out sheet shows a Stanley 1 2/3 HP router for use in our portable router table project.

I have RL Carter/Stanley catalogs.
Work like that could have be done on a shaper with the proper knives and jigs.
The basic bench could very well be over 100 years old. It is a copy of the Shaker bench at the Fruitlands Museum, now called something else and the original is featured on the cover of the Workbench Book put out by Taunton Press.


[ 02-20-2004, 01:30 PM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]