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W Hersey
12-17-2003, 01:53 PM
Being sick of having deep cycle batteries last about 5 years, and knowing how rough they are on the environment when they are disposed of, I am about to try a system I have heard of called DuroGen. It was developed in Canada, is highly touted for its success, and is cheap (relative to the cost of new batteries). What it does is restore old sulfated batteries back to full service.

The "kit" consists of a chemical elixer added to the sulfated batteries, then a small pulse charger connected to each bank. Within 30 days the sulfate crystals on the lead plates begin to go back into solution, and in two months the batteries are back to full service.

I will keep you posted on how it works. I have three banks of golf carts that have served well, and if I can regenerate them for a total cost of $71.00, I'll be a happy guy.

Maybe some of you have had experience with this system. If so, I would like to hear about it. I mean, $71 is still $71!

W Hersey
12-17-2003, 01:53 PM
Being sick of having deep cycle batteries last about 5 years, and knowing how rough they are on the environment when they are disposed of, I am about to try a system I have heard of called DuroGen. It was developed in Canada, is highly touted for its success, and is cheap (relative to the cost of new batteries). What it does is restore old sulfated batteries back to full service.

The "kit" consists of a chemical elixer added to the sulfated batteries, then a small pulse charger connected to each bank. Within 30 days the sulfate crystals on the lead plates begin to go back into solution, and in two months the batteries are back to full service.

I will keep you posted on how it works. I have three banks of golf carts that have served well, and if I can regenerate them for a total cost of $71.00, I'll be a happy guy.

Maybe some of you have had experience with this system. If so, I would like to hear about it. I mean, $71 is still $71!

W Hersey
12-17-2003, 01:53 PM
Being sick of having deep cycle batteries last about 5 years, and knowing how rough they are on the environment when they are disposed of, I am about to try a system I have heard of called DuroGen. It was developed in Canada, is highly touted for its success, and is cheap (relative to the cost of new batteries). What it does is restore old sulfated batteries back to full service.

The "kit" consists of a chemical elixer added to the sulfated batteries, then a small pulse charger connected to each bank. Within 30 days the sulfate crystals on the lead plates begin to go back into solution, and in two months the batteries are back to full service.

I will keep you posted on how it works. I have three banks of golf carts that have served well, and if I can regenerate them for a total cost of $71.00, I'll be a happy guy.

Maybe some of you have had experience with this system. If so, I would like to hear about it. I mean, $71 is still $71!

Ed Harrow
12-17-2003, 02:07 PM
TCGIK (the cheapest guy I know), back when we were poor students struggling to make tuition payments rejuvenated batteries as follows (and I can attest that it works, tho I bought new ones...)

1. Empty the acid into a suitable container
2. Using a hot, sharp implement, cut around the perimeter of the battery at the bottom.
3. Remove the bottom from the battery.
4. Clean out all the deposits.
5. Replace the bottom.
6. Reattach the bottom using a hot soldering iron.
7. Refill and recharge.

Not my idea of a worthwhile way to spend my time, then or now, LOL.

Ed Harrow
12-17-2003, 02:07 PM
TCGIK (the cheapest guy I know), back when we were poor students struggling to make tuition payments rejuvenated batteries as follows (and I can attest that it works, tho I bought new ones...)

1. Empty the acid into a suitable container
2. Using a hot, sharp implement, cut around the perimeter of the battery at the bottom.
3. Remove the bottom from the battery.
4. Clean out all the deposits.
5. Replace the bottom.
6. Reattach the bottom using a hot soldering iron.
7. Refill and recharge.

Not my idea of a worthwhile way to spend my time, then or now, LOL.

Ed Harrow
12-17-2003, 02:07 PM
TCGIK (the cheapest guy I know), back when we were poor students struggling to make tuition payments rejuvenated batteries as follows (and I can attest that it works, tho I bought new ones...)

1. Empty the acid into a suitable container
2. Using a hot, sharp implement, cut around the perimeter of the battery at the bottom.
3. Remove the bottom from the battery.
4. Clean out all the deposits.
5. Replace the bottom.
6. Reattach the bottom using a hot soldering iron.
7. Refill and recharge.

Not my idea of a worthwhile way to spend my time, then or now, LOL.

Dale Genther
12-17-2003, 02:44 PM
Ed- When I lived in Turkey in the late 70's, the method you described was the normal method of getting a "new" car battery when your went dead. They repaired the battery in my Renault that way. I only lived there for 6 months after the repair so I don't know how long it lasted.

Dale Genther
12-17-2003, 02:44 PM
Ed- When I lived in Turkey in the late 70's, the method you described was the normal method of getting a "new" car battery when your went dead. They repaired the battery in my Renault that way. I only lived there for 6 months after the repair so I don't know how long it lasted.

Dale Genther
12-17-2003, 02:44 PM
Ed- When I lived in Turkey in the late 70's, the method you described was the normal method of getting a "new" car battery when your went dead. They repaired the battery in my Renault that way. I only lived there for 6 months after the repair so I don't know how long it lasted.

ion barnes
12-18-2003, 07:35 PM
Ed, I would have guessed that you would cut around the top, thru the goo that originally seals the lid to the body. yes/no?

ion barnes
12-18-2003, 07:35 PM
Ed, I would have guessed that you would cut around the top, thru the goo that originally seals the lid to the body. yes/no?

ion barnes
12-18-2003, 07:35 PM
Ed, I would have guessed that you would cut around the top, thru the goo that originally seals the lid to the body. yes/no?

Frank Wentzel
12-18-2003, 10:58 PM
Bill

I used to work at the Exide Resarch Center (back in the 70's when they still had one). Battery life extension was the holy grail. We tested additives all the time. Mostly they were just electrolytes (most were based on epsom salt) that served to reduce the resistivity of the weak acid in an old sulphated battery. This would give you anything from no effect to a month or so reprieve before you had to replace the battery. Many product directions said to put it into a new battery to extend it's life - we never found a measureable effect. Except that is in the wallet of the customer!

Pulse charging was also tried as well. It turns out that a lead acid battery acts like a huge capacitor. A automotive battery may have a capacity of hundreds of thousands of microfarads. What this means is that when you attempt to pulse the battery the pulse is absorbed and dampened by the capacitative effect and so the pulse has no effect on the charging of the battery.

Of course, there is always the possibility that we overlooked something and that modern solid state circuitry might be able to accomplish something that our more primitive circuits could not. So I will be waiting for reports on your progress with the new system. However, I must admit however that I am rather cynical. If you look in adds from old magazine all the way back to the 1920's you will find many battery elixers. Believe it or not the battery companies wanted to find one that worked as much as anybody. In a mature industry profit margins are small. So the battery company that developed a longer life battery would be able to blow away the competition.

The old rejuvenation methods that involved removing the "sludge" from the bottom of the battery did work to a certain extent. The sludge tended to short out the battery so it's removal was very beneficial. Today that wouldn't work as well since most manufacturers put the plates in "envelopes" of microporous plastic which prevents the sludge from forming a current path between the plates.

Another technique for rejuvenation, often done while desludging, was to:
- Slowly discharge the battery till it is really flat (24 hr minimum).
- Dump out the electrolyte.
- Refill the battery with distilled water.
- Recharge the battery slowly (24 to 48 hrs or more).
- Dump out the battery again.
- Refill with fresh 1.280 sg sulfuric acid (electrolyte).

Why was all this done? Relatively speaking batteries were very expensive. I had a friend that bought a lead acid battery for his radio in 1920 that cost him $5 - over half of a weeks wages! (He was a machinist.) When I joined Exide in 1969, automotive batteries were still entirely handmade. You older guys will remember that in the late 60's a battery cost between $30 and $50 at Sears. They don't cost too much more than that now, but wages are 5 times as much. So it was almost worth going through these rejuvenation techniques.

/// Frank ///

Frank Wentzel
12-18-2003, 10:58 PM
Bill

I used to work at the Exide Resarch Center (back in the 70's when they still had one). Battery life extension was the holy grail. We tested additives all the time. Mostly they were just electrolytes (most were based on epsom salt) that served to reduce the resistivity of the weak acid in an old sulphated battery. This would give you anything from no effect to a month or so reprieve before you had to replace the battery. Many product directions said to put it into a new battery to extend it's life - we never found a measureable effect. Except that is in the wallet of the customer!

Pulse charging was also tried as well. It turns out that a lead acid battery acts like a huge capacitor. A automotive battery may have a capacity of hundreds of thousands of microfarads. What this means is that when you attempt to pulse the battery the pulse is absorbed and dampened by the capacitative effect and so the pulse has no effect on the charging of the battery.

Of course, there is always the possibility that we overlooked something and that modern solid state circuitry might be able to accomplish something that our more primitive circuits could not. So I will be waiting for reports on your progress with the new system. However, I must admit however that I am rather cynical. If you look in adds from old magazine all the way back to the 1920's you will find many battery elixers. Believe it or not the battery companies wanted to find one that worked as much as anybody. In a mature industry profit margins are small. So the battery company that developed a longer life battery would be able to blow away the competition.

The old rejuvenation methods that involved removing the "sludge" from the bottom of the battery did work to a certain extent. The sludge tended to short out the battery so it's removal was very beneficial. Today that wouldn't work as well since most manufacturers put the plates in "envelopes" of microporous plastic which prevents the sludge from forming a current path between the plates.

Another technique for rejuvenation, often done while desludging, was to:
- Slowly discharge the battery till it is really flat (24 hr minimum).
- Dump out the electrolyte.
- Refill the battery with distilled water.
- Recharge the battery slowly (24 to 48 hrs or more).
- Dump out the battery again.
- Refill with fresh 1.280 sg sulfuric acid (electrolyte).

Why was all this done? Relatively speaking batteries were very expensive. I had a friend that bought a lead acid battery for his radio in 1920 that cost him $5 - over half of a weeks wages! (He was a machinist.) When I joined Exide in 1969, automotive batteries were still entirely handmade. You older guys will remember that in the late 60's a battery cost between $30 and $50 at Sears. They don't cost too much more than that now, but wages are 5 times as much. So it was almost worth going through these rejuvenation techniques.

/// Frank ///

Frank Wentzel
12-18-2003, 10:58 PM
Bill

I used to work at the Exide Resarch Center (back in the 70's when they still had one). Battery life extension was the holy grail. We tested additives all the time. Mostly they were just electrolytes (most were based on epsom salt) that served to reduce the resistivity of the weak acid in an old sulphated battery. This would give you anything from no effect to a month or so reprieve before you had to replace the battery. Many product directions said to put it into a new battery to extend it's life - we never found a measureable effect. Except that is in the wallet of the customer!

Pulse charging was also tried as well. It turns out that a lead acid battery acts like a huge capacitor. A automotive battery may have a capacity of hundreds of thousands of microfarads. What this means is that when you attempt to pulse the battery the pulse is absorbed and dampened by the capacitative effect and so the pulse has no effect on the charging of the battery.

Of course, there is always the possibility that we overlooked something and that modern solid state circuitry might be able to accomplish something that our more primitive circuits could not. So I will be waiting for reports on your progress with the new system. However, I must admit however that I am rather cynical. If you look in adds from old magazine all the way back to the 1920's you will find many battery elixers. Believe it or not the battery companies wanted to find one that worked as much as anybody. In a mature industry profit margins are small. So the battery company that developed a longer life battery would be able to blow away the competition.

The old rejuvenation methods that involved removing the "sludge" from the bottom of the battery did work to a certain extent. The sludge tended to short out the battery so it's removal was very beneficial. Today that wouldn't work as well since most manufacturers put the plates in "envelopes" of microporous plastic which prevents the sludge from forming a current path between the plates.

Another technique for rejuvenation, often done while desludging, was to:
- Slowly discharge the battery till it is really flat (24 hr minimum).
- Dump out the electrolyte.
- Refill the battery with distilled water.
- Recharge the battery slowly (24 to 48 hrs or more).
- Dump out the battery again.
- Refill with fresh 1.280 sg sulfuric acid (electrolyte).

Why was all this done? Relatively speaking batteries were very expensive. I had a friend that bought a lead acid battery for his radio in 1920 that cost him $5 - over half of a weeks wages! (He was a machinist.) When I joined Exide in 1969, automotive batteries were still entirely handmade. You older guys will remember that in the late 60's a battery cost between $30 and $50 at Sears. They don't cost too much more than that now, but wages are 5 times as much. So it was almost worth going through these rejuvenation techniques.

/// Frank ///

Stiletto
12-19-2003, 04:21 AM
I have used an Australian product called Inox battery conditoner in a deep cycle battery that has been in my vehicle while the boat is having rather a lot of work done on it.
Their product has cadmium sulphate >10%.
My anecdotal experience is that it improved the battery performance by making the starter turn the motor over better on a cold winters morning.
I realise that this is pretty subjective ,but wonder if you know what cadmium sulphate does to a battery.
A google search for Inox Lubricants will show the guarantee they offer with their product; although I think a new battery is probably going to be ok any way.

Stiletto
12-19-2003, 04:21 AM
I have used an Australian product called Inox battery conditoner in a deep cycle battery that has been in my vehicle while the boat is having rather a lot of work done on it.
Their product has cadmium sulphate >10%.
My anecdotal experience is that it improved the battery performance by making the starter turn the motor over better on a cold winters morning.
I realise that this is pretty subjective ,but wonder if you know what cadmium sulphate does to a battery.
A google search for Inox Lubricants will show the guarantee they offer with their product; although I think a new battery is probably going to be ok any way.

Stiletto
12-19-2003, 04:21 AM
I have used an Australian product called Inox battery conditoner in a deep cycle battery that has been in my vehicle while the boat is having rather a lot of work done on it.
Their product has cadmium sulphate >10%.
My anecdotal experience is that it improved the battery performance by making the starter turn the motor over better on a cold winters morning.
I realise that this is pretty subjective ,but wonder if you know what cadmium sulphate does to a battery.
A google search for Inox Lubricants will show the guarantee they offer with their product; although I think a new battery is probably going to be ok any way.