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Alan D. Hyde
01-29-2001, 10:40 AM
It seems the older I get, the more splinters I get whenever I work with wood.

Maybe it's just that when I was younger I didn't notice them.

I've taken to wearing gloves more, particularly in the winter, when they make the unheated shop seem more comfortable.

I've been using unlined split cowhide gloves because they give me a better grip than do smooth gloves.

Anyone else notice this splinter thing, or is it just me?

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
01-29-2001, 10:40 AM
It seems the older I get, the more splinters I get whenever I work with wood.

Maybe it's just that when I was younger I didn't notice them.

I've taken to wearing gloves more, particularly in the winter, when they make the unheated shop seem more comfortable.

I've been using unlined split cowhide gloves because they give me a better grip than do smooth gloves.

Anyone else notice this splinter thing, or is it just me?

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
01-29-2001, 10:40 AM
It seems the older I get, the more splinters I get whenever I work with wood.

Maybe it's just that when I was younger I didn't notice them.

I've taken to wearing gloves more, particularly in the winter, when they make the unheated shop seem more comfortable.

I've been using unlined split cowhide gloves because they give me a better grip than do smooth gloves.

Anyone else notice this splinter thing, or is it just me?

Alan

Ed Harrow
01-29-2001, 01:00 PM
Oh Alan, the trouble with you is that you must not have drunk enough when you were younger; if you'd done so you'd not be noticing the odd splinter here or there. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/biggrin.gif

Now cold, on the other hand, is a different subject. The theory is that the brain cells that detect cold develop at a later date, meaning that it may not be too late, yet, for you. As for me, Throlo Trecker socks are my winter favorite, and SWMTMH got me a pair of polar fleece gloves that certainly take the edge off.

Can't do a cold shop tho. When the frost starts to form on the table saw it's time for a hot cup of hot tea. All those cold surfaces about my shop suck the heat out of my poor broken body at an alarming rate.

Ed Harrow
01-29-2001, 01:00 PM
Oh Alan, the trouble with you is that you must not have drunk enough when you were younger; if you'd done so you'd not be noticing the odd splinter here or there. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/biggrin.gif

Now cold, on the other hand, is a different subject. The theory is that the brain cells that detect cold develop at a later date, meaning that it may not be too late, yet, for you. As for me, Throlo Trecker socks are my winter favorite, and SWMTMH got me a pair of polar fleece gloves that certainly take the edge off.

Can't do a cold shop tho. When the frost starts to form on the table saw it's time for a hot cup of hot tea. All those cold surfaces about my shop suck the heat out of my poor broken body at an alarming rate.

Ed Harrow
01-29-2001, 01:00 PM
Oh Alan, the trouble with you is that you must not have drunk enough when you were younger; if you'd done so you'd not be noticing the odd splinter here or there. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/biggrin.gif

Now cold, on the other hand, is a different subject. The theory is that the brain cells that detect cold develop at a later date, meaning that it may not be too late, yet, for you. As for me, Throlo Trecker socks are my winter favorite, and SWMTMH got me a pair of polar fleece gloves that certainly take the edge off.

Can't do a cold shop tho. When the frost starts to form on the table saw it's time for a hot cup of hot tea. All those cold surfaces about my shop suck the heat out of my poor broken body at an alarming rate.

Chad Smith
01-29-2001, 02:48 PM
I don't like splinters myself, but I'm still at the age where I don't even notice them for a couple of days. I have gotten to the point though that I like to wear gloves when I do stuff like cut the grass or carry lumber. As far as the cold I just can't stand it. I've been wanting to try out the gloves that you can get through Duluth Trading Co.
http://www.duluthtrading.com
Go to there clothing line and look at the ironclad gloves, but at $30 a pair I just can't comment myself.

Chad

Chad Smith
01-29-2001, 02:48 PM
I don't like splinters myself, but I'm still at the age where I don't even notice them for a couple of days. I have gotten to the point though that I like to wear gloves when I do stuff like cut the grass or carry lumber. As far as the cold I just can't stand it. I've been wanting to try out the gloves that you can get through Duluth Trading Co.
http://www.duluthtrading.com
Go to there clothing line and look at the ironclad gloves, but at $30 a pair I just can't comment myself.

Chad

Chad Smith
01-29-2001, 02:48 PM
I don't like splinters myself, but I'm still at the age where I don't even notice them for a couple of days. I have gotten to the point though that I like to wear gloves when I do stuff like cut the grass or carry lumber. As far as the cold I just can't stand it. I've been wanting to try out the gloves that you can get through Duluth Trading Co.
http://www.duluthtrading.com
Go to there clothing line and look at the ironclad gloves, but at $30 a pair I just can't comment myself.

Chad

abe
01-29-2001, 04:10 PM
The splinter is inevitable, http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/frown.gif and every shop first-aid kit must have a tube of Ichthammol Ointment 20%. Smells and looks like pine tar.

Only thing that will attack those 1/2 inch long hemlock or cedar splinters without danger of infection and a trip to the ER a week later.

abe
01-29-2001, 04:10 PM
The splinter is inevitable, http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/frown.gif and every shop first-aid kit must have a tube of Ichthammol Ointment 20%. Smells and looks like pine tar.

Only thing that will attack those 1/2 inch long hemlock or cedar splinters without danger of infection and a trip to the ER a week later.

abe
01-29-2001, 04:10 PM
The splinter is inevitable, http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/frown.gif and every shop first-aid kit must have a tube of Ichthammol Ointment 20%. Smells and looks like pine tar.

Only thing that will attack those 1/2 inch long hemlock or cedar splinters without danger of infection and a trip to the ER a week later.

Wayne Jeffers
01-29-2001, 11:17 PM
Yes, Allen, I seem to get more splinters, too. I thought maybe I was just getting softer as I aged.

I wear gloves for most work, but not when woodworking. My shop is insulated and I keep a little heat on, at least enough to keep things from freezing.

When I quit smoking about 5 years ago, that did more good to stop the cold-hands syndrome than you can imagine. It may or may not give a particular smoker cancer, but tobacco definitely clogs your arteries.

I like iodine or merthiolate (I still have a bottle or two of the real stuff) for splinters. Iodine stains them really well so you can see to dig them out. Merthiolate seems to help draw out the ones I can't dig out. I have Icthammol, but I've never used it for splinters. I'll give it a shot next time.

Wayne

Wayne Jeffers
01-29-2001, 11:17 PM
Yes, Allen, I seem to get more splinters, too. I thought maybe I was just getting softer as I aged.

I wear gloves for most work, but not when woodworking. My shop is insulated and I keep a little heat on, at least enough to keep things from freezing.

When I quit smoking about 5 years ago, that did more good to stop the cold-hands syndrome than you can imagine. It may or may not give a particular smoker cancer, but tobacco definitely clogs your arteries.

I like iodine or merthiolate (I still have a bottle or two of the real stuff) for splinters. Iodine stains them really well so you can see to dig them out. Merthiolate seems to help draw out the ones I can't dig out. I have Icthammol, but I've never used it for splinters. I'll give it a shot next time.

Wayne

Wayne Jeffers
01-29-2001, 11:17 PM
Yes, Allen, I seem to get more splinters, too. I thought maybe I was just getting softer as I aged.

I wear gloves for most work, but not when woodworking. My shop is insulated and I keep a little heat on, at least enough to keep things from freezing.

When I quit smoking about 5 years ago, that did more good to stop the cold-hands syndrome than you can imagine. It may or may not give a particular smoker cancer, but tobacco definitely clogs your arteries.

I like iodine or merthiolate (I still have a bottle or two of the real stuff) for splinters. Iodine stains them really well so you can see to dig them out. Merthiolate seems to help draw out the ones I can't dig out. I have Icthammol, but I've never used it for splinters. I'll give it a shot next time.

Wayne

htom
01-30-2001, 12:54 AM
I get more splinters even though I'm wearing gloves more.

Overshoes seem to make more sense, too, as I'm just tired of always having to clean and polish my shoes from stepping in the salt crud that our streets and my garage floor become.

htom
01-30-2001, 12:54 AM
I get more splinters even though I'm wearing gloves more.

Overshoes seem to make more sense, too, as I'm just tired of always having to clean and polish my shoes from stepping in the salt crud that our streets and my garage floor become.

htom
01-30-2001, 12:54 AM
I get more splinters even though I'm wearing gloves more.

Overshoes seem to make more sense, too, as I'm just tired of always having to clean and polish my shoes from stepping in the salt crud that our streets and my garage floor become.

Syd MacDonald
01-30-2001, 10:26 PM
Allan, keep a good set of tweezers in your shop and a magnefying glass if necessary and get rid of those little splinters that drive you crazy for several days untill they finally disappear. When you first feel them there is usually enough sticking out to remove it with the tweezers and a good light.
If I can't remove it I shave it off short with a sharp knife and make the best of it.

Syd MacDonald
01-30-2001, 10:26 PM
Allan, keep a good set of tweezers in your shop and a magnefying glass if necessary and get rid of those little splinters that drive you crazy for several days untill they finally disappear. When you first feel them there is usually enough sticking out to remove it with the tweezers and a good light.
If I can't remove it I shave it off short with a sharp knife and make the best of it.

Syd MacDonald
01-30-2001, 10:26 PM
Allan, keep a good set of tweezers in your shop and a magnefying glass if necessary and get rid of those little splinters that drive you crazy for several days untill they finally disappear. When you first feel them there is usually enough sticking out to remove it with the tweezers and a good light.
If I can't remove it I shave it off short with a sharp knife and make the best of it.

Mike Field
01-31-2001, 01:49 AM
When all else fails, here's a trick I learnt from my Mum about a half-century ago for removing those really deep, recalcitrant splinters that are absolutely undigoutable. Just keep them covered with a kerosene-dampened bandage for a day or two -- it draws them back out the way they went in till you can get to the ends with tweezers. A bit smelly -- you might want to use finger-stall or something -- but by crikey it works. (I reckon mums are wonderful people.)

Mike Field
01-31-2001, 01:49 AM
When all else fails, here's a trick I learnt from my Mum about a half-century ago for removing those really deep, recalcitrant splinters that are absolutely undigoutable. Just keep them covered with a kerosene-dampened bandage for a day or two -- it draws them back out the way they went in till you can get to the ends with tweezers. A bit smelly -- you might want to use finger-stall or something -- but by crikey it works. (I reckon mums are wonderful people.)

Mike Field
01-31-2001, 01:49 AM
When all else fails, here's a trick I learnt from my Mum about a half-century ago for removing those really deep, recalcitrant splinters that are absolutely undigoutable. Just keep them covered with a kerosene-dampened bandage for a day or two -- it draws them back out the way they went in till you can get to the ends with tweezers. A bit smelly -- you might want to use finger-stall or something -- but by crikey it works. (I reckon mums are wonderful people.)

Ross Faneuf
01-31-2001, 09:24 PM
Ditto on the splinters. I mostly use goatskin gloves, when I can find them. They are thin and tough, and you can do things wearing them you wouldn't dream of with cowhide gloves. Like pick up a dime or open the blades of a jack knife. They're more expensive, smell funny, and last a lot longer. Particulary good for working in the cold.

Ross Faneuf
01-31-2001, 09:24 PM
Ditto on the splinters. I mostly use goatskin gloves, when I can find them. They are thin and tough, and you can do things wearing them you wouldn't dream of with cowhide gloves. Like pick up a dime or open the blades of a jack knife. They're more expensive, smell funny, and last a lot longer. Particulary good for working in the cold.

Ross Faneuf
01-31-2001, 09:24 PM
Ditto on the splinters. I mostly use goatskin gloves, when I can find them. They are thin and tough, and you can do things wearing them you wouldn't dream of with cowhide gloves. Like pick up a dime or open the blades of a jack knife. They're more expensive, smell funny, and last a lot longer. Particulary good for working in the cold.

Ron Williamson
01-31-2001, 09:43 PM
I don't wear gloves at work unless I'm painting,googeing or unloading a truck.
I prefer splinters in my skin to getting snagged on a broken knot and being,GULP!,drawn into a big machine.Same rule about baggy clothes.
The machine room has only solar heat(warm in summer and cold in winter).
The trick is to dress for it and/or ignore it,but gloves are out.

Ron Williamson
01-31-2001, 09:43 PM
I don't wear gloves at work unless I'm painting,googeing or unloading a truck.
I prefer splinters in my skin to getting snagged on a broken knot and being,GULP!,drawn into a big machine.Same rule about baggy clothes.
The machine room has only solar heat(warm in summer and cold in winter).
The trick is to dress for it and/or ignore it,but gloves are out.

Ron Williamson
01-31-2001, 09:43 PM
I don't wear gloves at work unless I'm painting,googeing or unloading a truck.
I prefer splinters in my skin to getting snagged on a broken knot and being,GULP!,drawn into a big machine.Same rule about baggy clothes.
The machine room has only solar heat(warm in summer and cold in winter).
The trick is to dress for it and/or ignore it,but gloves are out.

Andrew
02-01-2001, 08:55 AM
Double ditto on the splinters. I was wondering if it is an age thing too. I seem to skin my knuckles a lot more as well. I try to always wear gloves when loading/moving wood, especially ply. I a pair of glove with the tips cut off the fingers when working in a cold shed. An Exacto knife is my tool of choice for removing splinters if the tweezers can't get it.

Andrew
02-01-2001, 08:55 AM
Double ditto on the splinters. I was wondering if it is an age thing too. I seem to skin my knuckles a lot more as well. I try to always wear gloves when loading/moving wood, especially ply. I a pair of glove with the tips cut off the fingers when working in a cold shed. An Exacto knife is my tool of choice for removing splinters if the tweezers can't get it.

Andrew
02-01-2001, 08:55 AM
Double ditto on the splinters. I was wondering if it is an age thing too. I seem to skin my knuckles a lot more as well. I try to always wear gloves when loading/moving wood, especially ply. I a pair of glove with the tips cut off the fingers when working in a cold shed. An Exacto knife is my tool of choice for removing splinters if the tweezers can't get it.

Bruce Hooke
02-01-2001, 12:03 PM
I find that being cold seems to make my hands more vulnerable to splinters and scratches. I'm not sure if it's something the cold does to my skin or if it's what the cold does to my reflexes. Maybe in part because of the latter effect I also find it darn near impossible to do refined work in a cold shop...

Also, this may sound surprising, but I find nail clippers to be an excellent device for removing splinters. If the splinter is buried you can gently remove skin down to the splinter without it hurting too much and if you are gentle the teeth of the clipper can get a good grip on the splinter to pull it out. On additional advantage is that you can easily keep a pair in your pocket where they are handy when you get a splinter away from home. I learned this trick from my father...

Bruce Hooke
02-01-2001, 12:03 PM
I find that being cold seems to make my hands more vulnerable to splinters and scratches. I'm not sure if it's something the cold does to my skin or if it's what the cold does to my reflexes. Maybe in part because of the latter effect I also find it darn near impossible to do refined work in a cold shop...

Also, this may sound surprising, but I find nail clippers to be an excellent device for removing splinters. If the splinter is buried you can gently remove skin down to the splinter without it hurting too much and if you are gentle the teeth of the clipper can get a good grip on the splinter to pull it out. On additional advantage is that you can easily keep a pair in your pocket where they are handy when you get a splinter away from home. I learned this trick from my father...

Bruce Hooke
02-01-2001, 12:03 PM
I find that being cold seems to make my hands more vulnerable to splinters and scratches. I'm not sure if it's something the cold does to my skin or if it's what the cold does to my reflexes. Maybe in part because of the latter effect I also find it darn near impossible to do refined work in a cold shop...

Also, this may sound surprising, but I find nail clippers to be an excellent device for removing splinters. If the splinter is buried you can gently remove skin down to the splinter without it hurting too much and if you are gentle the teeth of the clipper can get a good grip on the splinter to pull it out. On additional advantage is that you can easily keep a pair in your pocket where they are handy when you get a splinter away from home. I learned this trick from my father...

Jamie Hascall
02-01-2001, 04:07 PM
I learned a trick from my old father in law who was a lumbrman. He would wrap tape around the finger over the splinter and said the adhesive would slowly draw the splinter out. I tended to keep a set of very fine point tweezers in my apron so I could just pull them out right away. I found that finding the little bugger was usually the hardest part. My two methods were to hold the finger up with a bright light behind it and rotate the finger until the splinter would break the horizon of the finger against the light; and the other was to feel for it with the tip of my tongue and take it out with my front teeth. That worked amazingly well for the little ones that just sit and itch.

Jamie

Jamie Hascall
02-01-2001, 04:07 PM
I learned a trick from my old father in law who was a lumbrman. He would wrap tape around the finger over the splinter and said the adhesive would slowly draw the splinter out. I tended to keep a set of very fine point tweezers in my apron so I could just pull them out right away. I found that finding the little bugger was usually the hardest part. My two methods were to hold the finger up with a bright light behind it and rotate the finger until the splinter would break the horizon of the finger against the light; and the other was to feel for it with the tip of my tongue and take it out with my front teeth. That worked amazingly well for the little ones that just sit and itch.

Jamie

Jamie Hascall
02-01-2001, 04:07 PM
I learned a trick from my old father in law who was a lumbrman. He would wrap tape around the finger over the splinter and said the adhesive would slowly draw the splinter out. I tended to keep a set of very fine point tweezers in my apron so I could just pull them out right away. I found that finding the little bugger was usually the hardest part. My two methods were to hold the finger up with a bright light behind it and rotate the finger until the splinter would break the horizon of the finger against the light; and the other was to feel for it with the tip of my tongue and take it out with my front teeth. That worked amazingly well for the little ones that just sit and itch.

Jamie