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skuthorp
04-28-2015, 05:40 PM
Joni Mitchell is in a coma and her longtime friend Leslie Morris has just filed legal documents to obtain a conservatorship over the singer, according to a report by TMZ (http://www.tmz.com/2015/04/28/joni-mitchell-coma-conservatorship-health-update-hospital/).
Mitchell, 71, was rushed to a UCLA Medical Center on March 31 after being found unconscious at her Los Angeles home. She is still there, according to the celebrity news site.
The conservatorship documents say she is unresponsive and “incapable of being assessed.”
Four days after Mitchell was hospitalized, the singer’s official website (http://jonimitchell.com/newsitem.cfm?id=737) issued an update on her condition saying, “Joni remains under observation in the hospital and is resting comfortably. We are encouraged by her progress and she continues to improve and get stronger each day.”

JimD
04-28-2015, 05:43 PM
An important artist of her (which means in many cases our) generation. I was a big fan in the 70s.

Phillip Allen
04-28-2015, 05:46 PM
it's sad to hear of this...

Willin'
04-28-2015, 07:17 PM
She was a lifelong, unapologetic, tobacco romanticist. IOW, she somehow believed smoking was sexy. Despite my sadness at learning of her medical condition, I suspect it stems from her personal choices.

Good luck, Joni!

Nanoose
04-28-2015, 07:54 PM
Grew up on her music. Loved her strength, how well she knew herself and lived how she wanted to live. This is sad news. Be well, Joni.

Lew Barrett
04-28-2015, 08:13 PM
One of my favorites, right at the top. A great talent.

Nanoose
04-28-2015, 08:28 PM
Clarification: not in a coma

http://www.thedailybeast.com/cheats/2015/04/28/joni-mitchell-is-in-a-coma.html

SMARTINSEN
04-28-2015, 09:08 PM
"I have this weird, incurable disease that seems like it's from outer space, but my health's the best it's been in a while, Two nights ago, I went out for the first time since Dec. 23: I don't look so bad under incandescent light, but I look scary under daylight. Garbo and Dietrich hid away just because people became so upset watching them age, but this is worse. Fibers in a variety of colors protrude out of my skin like mushrooms after a rainstorm: they cannot be forensically identified as animal, vegetable or mineral. Morgellons is a slow, unpredictable killer – a terrorist disease: it will blow up one of your organs, leaving you in bed for a year. But I have a tremendous will to live: I've been through another pandemic – I'm a polio survivor, so I know how conservative the medical body can be. In America, the Morgellons is always diagnosed as 'delusion of parasites', and they send you to a psychiatrist. I'm actually trying to get out of the music business to battle for Morgellons sufferers to receive the credibility that's owed to them."


|||

Osborne Russell
04-28-2015, 09:41 PM
She's ours.


Sitting in a park in Paris France
Reading the news and it sure looks bad
They won't give peace a chance
That was just a dream some of us had
Still a lot of lands to see
But I wouldn't want to stay here
It's too old and cold and settled in its ways here
Oh but California

California I'm coming home
I'm going to see the folks I dig
I'll even kiss a Sunset pig
California I'm coming home

Willin'
04-28-2015, 10:01 PM
My favorite...


The wind is in from Africa
Last night I couldn't sleep
Oh, you know it sure is hard to leave here Carey
But it's really not my home
My fingernails are filthy, I got beach tar on my feet
And I miss my clean white linen and my fancy French cologne

Something about dirty fingernails, beach tar and summer beach towns takes me back.

Gerarddm
04-28-2015, 10:24 PM
An under-appreciated jazz songwriter and singer.

willmarsh3
04-28-2015, 10:34 PM
I grew up hearing songs like this

http://youtu.be/VRsbtO_47_k

I wish her well.

John How
04-28-2015, 11:14 PM
Those were really great songs and few are the songwriters that are memorable. Live long Joni...

purri
04-29-2015, 12:23 AM
She remains simply sublime, like Buffy St. Marie.

Jim Bow
04-29-2015, 01:08 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morgellons

Garret
04-29-2015, 07:09 AM
Thanks for the post & I hope she does better. A # of her albums are on my desert island list.

Probably my top song is River


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpFudDAYqxY&feature=player_detailpage

Michael D. Storey
04-29-2015, 10:06 AM
My favorite...



Something about dirty fingernails, beach tar and summer beach towns takes me back.

I am sure that anyone who has been a deepwater sailor knows that feeling of 'the wind is in from Africa, last night I couldn't sleep...'
She was the soundtrack of my life through my Museum days.
Odd, I just watched The Last Waltz yesterday.
I happen to like the new stuff, after that sweet warbly voice was long snuffed out in an ash tray best.
I wish her the very best.

Canoeyawl
04-29-2015, 11:19 AM
I have known several people with polio, beginning in the 1950s when one of my close friends was stricken. (His mother died from it then, he did not die from it until 30 years later) and several others through the years, all eventually succumbing to it. It is a very nasty disease and is never "over".
Not a lot is known about Post-polio syndrome, but I would not rule anything neurological off the table. I am very sorry for her. Just because the medical community does not have the answer, being labeled a nutcase is not going to help anything.
(This labeling seems driven by insurance companies unwilling to pay for treatment, note Lyme disease, the insurance companies are terrified of any long term treatment, and have the medical community on the payroll speaking out against sufferers).

"Mechanism


Numerous theories have been proposed to explain post-polio syndrome. Despite this, there are currently no absolutely defined causes of PPS. The most widely accepted theory of the mechanism behind the disorder is "neural fatigue". A motor unit is a nerve cell (or neuron) and the muscle fibers it activates. Poliovirus attacks specific neurons in the brainstem and the anterior horn cells of the spinal cord, generally resulting in the death of a substantial fraction of the motor neurons controlling skeletal muscles. In an effort to compensate for the loss of these neurons, surviving motor neurons sprout new nerve terminals to the orphaned muscle fibers. The result is some recovery of movement and the development of enlarged motor units.[3]


The neural fatigue theory proposes that the enlargement of the motor neuron fibers places added metabolic stress on the nerve cell body to nourish the additional fibers. After years of use, this stress may be more than the neuron can handle, leading to the gradual deterioration of the sprouted fibers and, eventually, the neuron itself. This causes muscle weakness and paralysis. Restoration of nerve function may occur in some fibers a second time, but eventually nerve terminals malfunction and permanent weakness occurs.[3] When these neurons no longer carry on sprouting, fatigue occurs due to the increasing metabolic demand of the nervous system.[6] The normal aging process also may play a role. There is an ongoing denervation and reinnervation, but the reinnervation process has an upper limit where the reinnervation cannot compensate for the ongoing denervation, and loss of motor units takes place.[7] However, what disturbs the denervation-reinnervation equilibrium and causes peripheral denervation is still unclear. With age, most people experience a decrease in the number of spinal motor neurons. Because polio survivors have already lost a considerable number of motor neurons, further age-related loss of neurons may contribute substantially to new muscle weakness. The overuse and underuse of muscles also may contribute to muscle weakness.[8]


Another theory is that people who have recovered from polio lose remaining healthy neurons at a faster rate than normal. However, little evidence exists to support this idea.[9] Finally, it has been proposed that the initial polio infection causes an autoimmune reaction, in which the body's immune system attacks normal cells as if they were foreign substances. Again, compared to neural fatigue, the evidence supporting this theory is quite limited.[9]"
wiki

TomF
04-29-2015, 01:46 PM
I recognize the talent, but have never really been a fan. I'm a melody guy, and too often for me the melodies seemed like afterthoughts for presenting the poetry.

WX
04-29-2015, 07:58 PM
She remains simply sublime, like Buffy St. Marie.

I saw Buffy live and would have very much liked to have seen Joni.

CWSmith
04-29-2015, 08:32 PM
I recognize the talent, but have never really been a fan. I'm a melody guy, and too often for me the melodies seemed like afterthoughts for presenting the poetry.

I must admit to the same and somehow I regret it.

Dave Gray
04-29-2015, 08:38 PM
I was 16 when some girl I knew invited me over to listen to the Blue album. I was into Cream Chariots of Fire, Jim, and Led Zeppelin. Needless to say I wasn't too impressed... But I definitely like her later stuff. Twisted is great!

Jim Bow
04-29-2015, 11:58 PM
For me, it's not Christmas till I've heard " River".

purri
04-30-2015, 02:42 AM
^ or the hissing of summer lawns...

ShagRock
04-30-2015, 03:29 AM
I recognize the talent, but have never really been a fan. I'm a melody guy, and too often for me the melodies seemed like afterthoughts for presenting the poetry.

Where's your famous 'parking lot' melody? Down in the harbour with your wooden boats?

TomF
04-30-2015, 05:57 AM
Where's your famous 'parking lot' melody? Down in the harbour with your wooden boats?It's ok, but it isn't even a mid-level melody by the Beatles, or Aretha, or CCR, or many of the similar-strata folks of about the same period. The lyrics are great, but the melody ... meh. De gustibus.

Vince Brennan
04-30-2015, 08:06 PM
Morgellons. Damn, what a shame to discover that under all the weirdness and strangeness is just a lot of weirdness and strangeness.

tomlarkin
05-01-2015, 12:01 AM
Morgellons. Damn, what a shame to discover that under all the weirdness and strangeness is just a lot of weirdness and strangeness.

After reading about that (and doing an image search), I'm itchy all over.

Chris Coose
05-01-2015, 06:35 AM
Been a fan since the early days. Saw her at Newport. She was brave to take on the Mingus interpretation and thanks to her for the introduction of Pat Methany, Lyle Mays and Jaco Pastorius. Shadows and Light remains one of my favorite albums of all time.

Paul Pless
05-01-2015, 06:46 AM
you can't tell me that this wouldn't bother you?

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQfUd0h7tgHMmJQlf0KaKpajcfY7k1W_ OLJ28oTyiS55eYJSIu8SQ

Ian McColgin
05-01-2015, 06:55 AM
If we understood the metabolic pathways for this, we'd likely stop calling it delusional. We are more like a colony than an individual, with all sorts of critters of no shared human DNA occupying space between our cells and they have often obscure roles in human health. It's likely that something as yet unidentified - could be chemical from the environment or from organismic stress factors - that cause those organisms to produce these odd extrusions. The cluster of visible and invisible symptoms inevitably concentrate at skin level.

Treating it as a psychiatric disorder is just stupid.

JimD
05-01-2015, 09:03 AM
... We are more like a colony than an individual, with all sorts of critters of no shared human DNA occupying space between our cells and they have often obscure roles in human health...
Most estimates these days are that the great majority of cells that make each of us up are non human, mainly bacteria. The importance of symbiosis is under appreciated.

Bruce Taylor
05-01-2015, 11:10 AM
Most estimates these days are that the great majority of cells that make each of us up are non human, mainly bacteria. The importance of symbiosis is under appreciated.

And hey, from a cladistic point of view we are bacteria. :D

Symbiosis was under-appreciated in the past, but it's all the rage, these days. A book you might enjoy, from a researcher at Dalhousie (a happening scene in the thrill-a-minute world of eukaryotic microbiology): http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780199660599.do

http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/images/en_US/covers/large/9780199660599_450.jpg

JimD
05-01-2015, 11:22 AM
And hey, from a cladistic point of view we are bacteria. :D

Symbiosis was under-appreciated in the past, but it's all the rage, these days. A book you might enjoy, from a researcher at Dalhousie (a happening scene in the thrill-a-minute world of eukaryotic microbiology): http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780199660599.do

http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/images/en_US/covers/large/9780199660599_450.jpg

That does look exciting! Thanks, Bruce ;) Yes, as you say, its gained acceptance scientifically. But among the less informed laity I think its still a little surprising for most to learn that as individuals we are not as alone as it is often presumed.

Canoeyawl
05-01-2015, 11:28 AM
Looking at a sequence map of the earth showing human habitation looks very much like bacteria taking over a host. And now that the host is dying, it looks like bacteria trying to get to Mars

JimD
05-01-2015, 11:31 AM
... And now that the host is dying, it looks like bacteria trying to get to Mars
Yeah, like that's gonna happen! 'Smart' diseases know better than to kill their host. So we're not even all that clever at the level of viruses. Take that! You big brained apes!

PS - Now this is what I call thread drift. From Joni Mitchell in a coma to the human disease and the search for a new host. We are stardust....

Garret
05-01-2015, 11:37 AM
I thought we were billion year old carbon?

Dave Wright
05-01-2015, 11:51 AM
you can't tell me that this wouldn't bother you?

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQfUd0h7tgHMmJQlf0KaKpajcfY7k1W_ OLJ28oTyiS55eYJSIu8SQ

That's a leech. I don't care for leeches

Paul Pless
05-01-2015, 12:08 PM
We are stardust....that's just what god wants you to think, Jim. . .

Canoeyawl
05-01-2015, 01:49 PM
I thought we were billion year old carbon?

Carbon is always looking for a younger woman to bond with...

Garret
05-01-2015, 03:23 PM
Carbon is always looking for a younger woman to bond with...

I know it's a Joni thread, but Kate McGarrigle does a song:


http://www.mcgarrigles.com/uncategorized/kates-nacl-the-salt-song-a-chemical-love-story-animated-by-john-knowles

JimD
05-01-2015, 06:47 PM
that's just what god wants you to think, Jim. . . He's a clever basterd. Very manipulative and not to be trusted.