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View Full Version : Too bad she turned her own children into victims



Norman Bernstein
04-16-2015, 03:32 PM
Sadly, there will be plenty who, even after reading this, STILL won't get the message.... possibly, even Rand Paul and Chris Christie.


In the ongoing skirmishes between public health officials and vaccine skeptics, I'm scoring this one for the pro-immunization forces. A Canadian woman who had declined to have her children immunized against pertussis, better known as whooping cough, has changed her position now that all seven of her children have come down with the disease.

Yes, Tara Hills was stuck in isolation at her Ottawa home for more than a week with her sick children and her regrets about refusing to vaccinate them against the highly contagious respiratory disease. Whooping cough, a bacterial infection, causes violent, uncontrollable coughing and is best known for the telltale sound victims make as they try to draw breath. Occasionally, it can be fatal, especially in infants less than a year old,according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (http://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/index.html)

The Hills kids completed a course of antibiotics and were released from isolation Tuesday.

"I set out to prove that we were right," Hills said in an interview with the Washington Post, "and in the process found out how wrong we were."

Vaccination rates in Canada, like those in United States, have waned in some communities, mostly as a result of increased skepticism about the dangers of immunization that have spread on the Internet despite overwhelming scientific evidence that vaccines are safe and effective. A debunked 1998 study linked the measles vaccine to autism. Both Canada and the U.S. have suffered large outbreaks of whooping cough and measles in recent years.

In an April 8 post she wrote for the blog TheScientificParent.org, (http://thescientificparent.org/learning-the-hard-way-my-journey-from-antivaxx-to-science/#more-576) Hills offered many of the most common reasons for skepticism about vaccines. She and her husband had partially immunized their first three children, but decided against any vaccines for the next four.

"We stopped because we were scared and didn’t know who to trust," she wrote. "Was the medical community just paid off puppets of a Big Pharma-Government-Media conspiracy? Were these vaccines even necessary in this day and age? Were we unwittingly doing greater harm than help to our beloved children? So much smoke must mean a fire, so we defaulted to the ‘do nothing and hope nothing bad happens’ position."

But when a small measles outbreak hit nearby, Hills was terrified. "I looked again at the science and evidence for community immunity and found myself gripped with a very real sense of personal and social responsibility before God and man. The time had come to make a more fully informed decision than we did 6 years ago. I sat down with our family doctor and we put together a catch-up vaccination schedule (http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/hcp/child-adolescent.html) for our children," she wrote.
[Whooping cough sweeps through California (http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2014/06/16/whooping-cough-sweeps-through-california/)]

But before that could happen, all her children came down with whooping cough. A vaccine for the disease has existed in Canada for 70 years.

"Right now my family is living the consequences of misinformation and fear," Hills wrote. "I understand that families in our community may be mad at us for putting their kids at risk. I want them to know that we tried our best to protect our kids when we were afraid of vaccination and we are doing our best now, for everyone’s sake, by getting them up to date."

The only silver lining about learning the hard way is the knowledge that minds can be changed on this subject, she said.

"People like me who were hesitant, who were confused, who froze, we can be reached if people use the right approach," she told the Post.

Paul Pless
04-16-2015, 03:35 PM
Canada! Say it ain't so. . .

John of Phoenix
04-16-2015, 03:37 PM
Canada! Say it ain't so. . .It's that damned internet thing.


skepticism about the dangers of immunization that have spread on the Internet despite overwhelming scientific evidence that vaccines are safe and effective

seanz
04-16-2015, 03:43 PM
Speaking of the internet, poor woman has been all over it recently. It's ironic that her children got whooping cough after she changed her mind but she had changed her mind, not that that is how it's being headlined.
Hopefully this will help change other people's minds.

CWSmith
04-16-2015, 03:44 PM
Say it loud and say it often. If you love your kids, immunize them.

skuthorp
04-16-2015, 04:04 PM
Failure to immunise should be regarded as child abuse, if not a danger to public health.

seanz
04-16-2015, 06:45 PM
Here's one tactic to 'promote' immunization.

http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/abbott-government-withdraws-childcare-payments-for-antivaccination-parents-20150412-1mj837.html


Parents who are "conscientious objectors" to childhood vaccination will have their childcare and family tax payments stopped from 1 January next year as the federal government attempts to crack down on the anti-vaccination movement.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott announced on Sunday a loophole would be closed to stop payments to parents worth up to $15,000 per child.
"Parents who vaccinate their children should have confidence that they can take their children to childcare without the fear that their children will be at risk of contracting a serious or potentially life-threatening illness because of the conscientious objections of others," Mr Abbott said.
Although Australia's overall childhood vaccination rates remain high - about 97 per cent - the numbers of people who are registered conscientious objectors has risen in the past 10 years