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cs
08-07-2003, 07:39 AM
Been trying to find some pan head wood screws made out of brass, preferably cross tip. It seems that these are hard to find. All the carry at the hardware store is slotted. Any clues out there?

Chad

cs
08-07-2003, 07:39 AM
Been trying to find some pan head wood screws made out of brass, preferably cross tip. It seems that these are hard to find. All the carry at the hardware store is slotted. Any clues out there?

Chad

cs
08-07-2003, 07:39 AM
Been trying to find some pan head wood screws made out of brass, preferably cross tip. It seems that these are hard to find. All the carry at the hardware store is slotted. Any clues out there?

Chad

Venchka
08-07-2003, 01:00 PM
You might call ClarkCraft. I bought some bronze screws from them that weren't listed on the internet.

Clark Craft [clarkcraft.com]
16-99 Aqua Lane, Tonawanda, NY 14150
Tel: (716) 873-2640 Fax: (716) 873-2651

Venchka
08-07-2003, 01:00 PM
You might call ClarkCraft. I bought some bronze screws from them that weren't listed on the internet.

Clark Craft [clarkcraft.com]
16-99 Aqua Lane, Tonawanda, NY 14150
Tel: (716) 873-2640 Fax: (716) 873-2651

Venchka
08-07-2003, 01:00 PM
You might call ClarkCraft. I bought some bronze screws from them that weren't listed on the internet.

Clark Craft [clarkcraft.com]
16-99 Aqua Lane, Tonawanda, NY 14150
Tel: (716) 873-2640 Fax: (716) 873-2651

Concordia..41
08-07-2003, 04:12 PM
Jamestown Distributors (http://www.jamestowndistributors.com) seems to have a small selection of phillips tip in brass, but the catalog doesn't note whether they're pan or flat.

Cheers!

Concordia..41
08-07-2003, 04:12 PM
Jamestown Distributors (http://www.jamestowndistributors.com) seems to have a small selection of phillips tip in brass, but the catalog doesn't note whether they're pan or flat.

Cheers!

Concordia..41
08-07-2003, 04:12 PM
Jamestown Distributors (http://www.jamestowndistributors.com) seems to have a small selection of phillips tip in brass, but the catalog doesn't note whether they're pan or flat.

Cheers!

cs
08-07-2003, 04:31 PM
Thanks for the leads. I finally found some locally, but they have to be ordered in and a #8 x 2" long is $20 a hundred. I may just re-think the way I'm doing things.

Chad

cs
08-07-2003, 04:31 PM
Thanks for the leads. I finally found some locally, but they have to be ordered in and a #8 x 2" long is $20 a hundred. I may just re-think the way I'm doing things.

Chad

cs
08-07-2003, 04:31 PM
Thanks for the leads. I finally found some locally, but they have to be ordered in and a #8 x 2" long is $20 a hundred. I may just re-think the way I'm doing things.

Chad

Venchka
08-07-2003, 04:57 PM
If my CRS isn't acting up too much, I think the price from Clark Craft for bronze oval head R&P #10x1-1/2" was about $19/100 if that helps any.

Venchka
08-07-2003, 04:57 PM
If my CRS isn't acting up too much, I think the price from Clark Craft for bronze oval head R&P #10x1-1/2" was about $19/100 if that helps any.

Venchka
08-07-2003, 04:57 PM
If my CRS isn't acting up too much, I think the price from Clark Craft for bronze oval head R&P #10x1-1/2" was about $19/100 if that helps any.

Dave Fleming
08-07-2003, 05:01 PM
and a #8 x 2" long That is a rather long BRASS fastener to be using!

Make sure you have the correct pilot drill for it and it wouldn't hurt to run a steel screw of same diameter in the hole first plus lubricating the BRASS screw with beeswax prior to installing.

I buy Beeswax in bulk,usually a 2 pound block.
Melt it in a coffee can set in a pot of water over just enough heat to melt the wax, add a generous dollop of Pine Tar, let cool, cut of can and saw the resulting block into 1 inch thick pieces and keep at least one in my drill/screwdriver motor box and another in the fastener tray and of course on in my ditty bag for waxing twine.
I find that the Beeswax does not inhibit the glue used to set plugs over the heads of fasteners as does some other stuff.

Dave Fleming
08-07-2003, 05:01 PM
and a #8 x 2" long That is a rather long BRASS fastener to be using!

Make sure you have the correct pilot drill for it and it wouldn't hurt to run a steel screw of same diameter in the hole first plus lubricating the BRASS screw with beeswax prior to installing.

I buy Beeswax in bulk,usually a 2 pound block.
Melt it in a coffee can set in a pot of water over just enough heat to melt the wax, add a generous dollop of Pine Tar, let cool, cut of can and saw the resulting block into 1 inch thick pieces and keep at least one in my drill/screwdriver motor box and another in the fastener tray and of course on in my ditty bag for waxing twine.
I find that the Beeswax does not inhibit the glue used to set plugs over the heads of fasteners as does some other stuff.

Dave Fleming
08-07-2003, 05:01 PM
and a #8 x 2" long That is a rather long BRASS fastener to be using!

Make sure you have the correct pilot drill for it and it wouldn't hurt to run a steel screw of same diameter in the hole first plus lubricating the BRASS screw with beeswax prior to installing.

I buy Beeswax in bulk,usually a 2 pound block.
Melt it in a coffee can set in a pot of water over just enough heat to melt the wax, add a generous dollop of Pine Tar, let cool, cut of can and saw the resulting block into 1 inch thick pieces and keep at least one in my drill/screwdriver motor box and another in the fastener tray and of course on in my ditty bag for waxing twine.
I find that the Beeswax does not inhibit the glue used to set plugs over the heads of fasteners as does some other stuff.

Venchka
08-07-2003, 05:04 PM
Dave,

You have to write a book! One of these days I'll print all of your wisdom that you so graciously share here on the Forum.

Venchka
08-07-2003, 05:04 PM
Dave,

You have to write a book! One of these days I'll print all of your wisdom that you so graciously share here on the Forum.

Venchka
08-07-2003, 05:04 PM
Dave,

You have to write a book! One of these days I'll print all of your wisdom that you so graciously share here on the Forum.

cs
08-07-2003, 05:05 PM
Dave it isn't for a boat. It is to be used in home furnishing applications.

Chad

cs
08-07-2003, 05:05 PM
Dave it isn't for a boat. It is to be used in home furnishing applications.

Chad

cs
08-07-2003, 05:05 PM
Dave it isn't for a boat. It is to be used in home furnishing applications.

Chad

Dave Fleming
08-07-2003, 05:14 PM
Dave it isn't for a boat. It is to be used in home furnishing applications.
Don't matter Laddy Buck, the same procedures hold true. IMOOP, that is.

Dave Fleming
08-07-2003, 05:14 PM
Dave it isn't for a boat. It is to be used in home furnishing applications.
Don't matter Laddy Buck, the same procedures hold true. IMOOP, that is.

Dave Fleming
08-07-2003, 05:14 PM
Dave it isn't for a boat. It is to be used in home furnishing applications.
Don't matter Laddy Buck, the same procedures hold true. IMOOP, that is.

Tom Lathrop
08-07-2003, 06:24 PM
Dave,

I had a comode sealing ring left over from building our current house. It looked like it might serve for screw lubricant so I tried it out. Works better than anything else I have tried. It's already soft so it doesn't need heating. I jammed it into a plastic peanut butter jar and just dip the first few threads of the screw into the wax and then drive it home.

Don't know about compatibility issues but have had no problems so far.

Tom Lathrop
08-07-2003, 06:24 PM
Dave,

I had a comode sealing ring left over from building our current house. It looked like it might serve for screw lubricant so I tried it out. Works better than anything else I have tried. It's already soft so it doesn't need heating. I jammed it into a plastic peanut butter jar and just dip the first few threads of the screw into the wax and then drive it home.

Don't know about compatibility issues but have had no problems so far.

Tom Lathrop
08-07-2003, 06:24 PM
Dave,

I had a comode sealing ring left over from building our current house. It looked like it might serve for screw lubricant so I tried it out. Works better than anything else I have tried. It's already soft so it doesn't need heating. I jammed it into a plastic peanut butter jar and just dip the first few threads of the screw into the wax and then drive it home.

Don't know about compatibility issues but have had no problems so far.

Dave Fleming
08-07-2003, 07:33 PM
Yeah, I am aware of the toilet seat ring as a screw lubricant but, I'm thinkin' that is a petroleum based product not the same as Beeswax.
The beeswax and pine tar mix is just heated to blend not each and every time you use it.

Beeswax is harder in consistency than either canning wax another screw lube or those rings.
I think that has something to do with the lack of problems in glued plugs adhering.

FelsNaptha soap is another screw lubricant used by some but I am told that soaps are not to be considered good lubes for screws.
Although in a pinch I have used my 40 year old tin of Murphy's Oil Soap.

Dave Fleming
08-07-2003, 07:33 PM
Yeah, I am aware of the toilet seat ring as a screw lubricant but, I'm thinkin' that is a petroleum based product not the same as Beeswax.
The beeswax and pine tar mix is just heated to blend not each and every time you use it.

Beeswax is harder in consistency than either canning wax another screw lube or those rings.
I think that has something to do with the lack of problems in glued plugs adhering.

FelsNaptha soap is another screw lubricant used by some but I am told that soaps are not to be considered good lubes for screws.
Although in a pinch I have used my 40 year old tin of Murphy's Oil Soap.

Dave Fleming
08-07-2003, 07:33 PM
Yeah, I am aware of the toilet seat ring as a screw lubricant but, I'm thinkin' that is a petroleum based product not the same as Beeswax.
The beeswax and pine tar mix is just heated to blend not each and every time you use it.

Beeswax is harder in consistency than either canning wax another screw lube or those rings.
I think that has something to do with the lack of problems in glued plugs adhering.

FelsNaptha soap is another screw lubricant used by some but I am told that soaps are not to be considered good lubes for screws.
Although in a pinch I have used my 40 year old tin of Murphy's Oil Soap.

cs
08-08-2003, 07:27 AM
Dave you're right about the lubricant. When I was saying its not for a boat it was in reference to the length and type of screw I'm looking for. I realize that this would be a little flimsy if using on a boat.

Chad

cs
08-08-2003, 07:27 AM
Dave you're right about the lubricant. When I was saying its not for a boat it was in reference to the length and type of screw I'm looking for. I realize that this would be a little flimsy if using on a boat.

Chad

cs
08-08-2003, 07:27 AM
Dave you're right about the lubricant. When I was saying its not for a boat it was in reference to the length and type of screw I'm looking for. I realize that this would be a little flimsy if using on a boat.

Chad

Bruce Hooke
08-08-2003, 09:35 AM
For furniture use you could most likely use brass plated screws. I believe I've seen such in one or another of the standard woodworking catalogs...

Bruce Hooke
08-08-2003, 09:35 AM
For furniture use you could most likely use brass plated screws. I believe I've seen such in one or another of the standard woodworking catalogs...

Bruce Hooke
08-08-2003, 09:35 AM
For furniture use you could most likely use brass plated screws. I believe I've seen such in one or another of the standard woodworking catalogs...

Bruce Hooke
08-08-2003, 09:37 AM
I use straight beeswax to lubricate screws. What does adding pine tar do to improve the properties of the beeswax as a screw lubricant?

Bruce Hooke
08-08-2003, 09:37 AM
I use straight beeswax to lubricate screws. What does adding pine tar do to improve the properties of the beeswax as a screw lubricant?

Bruce Hooke
08-08-2003, 09:37 AM
I use straight beeswax to lubricate screws. What does adding pine tar do to improve the properties of the beeswax as a screw lubricant?

Wayne Jeffers
08-08-2003, 10:12 AM
Originally posted by Dave Fleming:
. . . but I am told that soaps are not to be considered good lubes for screws.
. . .I've been told that soap can cause the screws to corrode over time. Not a good thing.

I've been using the toilet ring wax, but I can't remember if I've pulled screws lubed with that. What problems might it cause?

Wayne

Wayne Jeffers
08-08-2003, 10:12 AM
Originally posted by Dave Fleming:
. . . but I am told that soaps are not to be considered good lubes for screws.
. . .I've been told that soap can cause the screws to corrode over time. Not a good thing.

I've been using the toilet ring wax, but I can't remember if I've pulled screws lubed with that. What problems might it cause?

Wayne

Wayne Jeffers
08-08-2003, 10:12 AM
Originally posted by Dave Fleming:
. . . but I am told that soaps are not to be considered good lubes for screws.
. . .I've been told that soap can cause the screws to corrode over time. Not a good thing.

I've been using the toilet ring wax, but I can't remember if I've pulled screws lubed with that. What problems might it cause?

Wayne

Paul Scheuer
11-24-2003, 02:00 PM
For that kind of money you could set up to turn normal flat heads to something that looks like a pan head if that's what you're after. A drill press would work fine. Might even work better in wood than a normal, flat on the under side, pan head.

Paul Scheuer
11-24-2003, 02:00 PM
For that kind of money you could set up to turn normal flat heads to something that looks like a pan head if that's what you're after. A drill press would work fine. Might even work better in wood than a normal, flat on the under side, pan head.

Paul Scheuer
11-24-2003, 02:00 PM
For that kind of money you could set up to turn normal flat heads to something that looks like a pan head if that's what you're after. A drill press would work fine. Might even work better in wood than a normal, flat on the under side, pan head.

N. Scheuer
11-24-2003, 06:47 PM
Sure you have the correct terminology, cs?

I've never seen a brass "Pan Head Screw". They are usually "Sheet Metal Screws", either zinc-plated steel or stainless steel, with either slotted or Phillips heads.

"Oval Head" (slightly rounded crown over a countersunk head) screws can be had in brass, and to my mind would seem more suitable for quality boat work.

Of course there are "Round Head Screws" in brass, as well as "Flat Head Screws", but "Round Head" had a higher profile than "Pan Head".

Moby Nick (Old Hand in the Fastener Industry, and resident of Rockford, IL, "Screw Capital of the World)

N. Scheuer
11-24-2003, 06:47 PM
Sure you have the correct terminology, cs?

I've never seen a brass "Pan Head Screw". They are usually "Sheet Metal Screws", either zinc-plated steel or stainless steel, with either slotted or Phillips heads.

"Oval Head" (slightly rounded crown over a countersunk head) screws can be had in brass, and to my mind would seem more suitable for quality boat work.

Of course there are "Round Head Screws" in brass, as well as "Flat Head Screws", but "Round Head" had a higher profile than "Pan Head".

Moby Nick (Old Hand in the Fastener Industry, and resident of Rockford, IL, "Screw Capital of the World)

N. Scheuer
11-24-2003, 06:47 PM
Sure you have the correct terminology, cs?

I've never seen a brass "Pan Head Screw". They are usually "Sheet Metal Screws", either zinc-plated steel or stainless steel, with either slotted or Phillips heads.

"Oval Head" (slightly rounded crown over a countersunk head) screws can be had in brass, and to my mind would seem more suitable for quality boat work.

Of course there are "Round Head Screws" in brass, as well as "Flat Head Screws", but "Round Head" had a higher profile than "Pan Head".

Moby Nick (Old Hand in the Fastener Industry, and resident of Rockford, IL, "Screw Capital of the World)

cs
11-25-2003, 07:32 AM
Nick what I wanted is some brass screws that would not have to be counter sunk and would stand proud of the wood with a round head. And I wanted these in brass with a cross tip. If its not called a pan head I'm not sure what it would be called. Nontheless they are hard to find.

Chad

cs
11-25-2003, 07:32 AM
Nick what I wanted is some brass screws that would not have to be counter sunk and would stand proud of the wood with a round head. And I wanted these in brass with a cross tip. If its not called a pan head I'm not sure what it would be called. Nontheless they are hard to find.

Chad

cs
11-25-2003, 07:32 AM
Nick what I wanted is some brass screws that would not have to be counter sunk and would stand proud of the wood with a round head. And I wanted these in brass with a cross tip. If its not called a pan head I'm not sure what it would be called. Nontheless they are hard to find.

Chad

newf
11-25-2003, 07:41 AM
Lee Valley has the slotted ones for 13.50 can./100

newf
11-25-2003, 07:41 AM
Lee Valley has the slotted ones for 13.50 can./100

newf
11-25-2003, 07:41 AM
Lee Valley has the slotted ones for 13.50 can./100

htom
11-25-2003, 10:40 AM
I think what your're looking for is a button head; are you sure that you don't want to use oval heads after one of those pilot-shank-sink bits?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screw#Shapes_of_Screw_Head

htom
11-25-2003, 10:40 AM
I think what your're looking for is a button head; are you sure that you don't want to use oval heads after one of those pilot-shank-sink bits?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screw#Shapes_of_Screw_Head

htom
11-25-2003, 10:40 AM
I think what your're looking for is a button head; are you sure that you don't want to use oval heads after one of those pilot-shank-sink bits?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screw#Shapes_of_Screw_Head

N. Scheuer
11-25-2003, 10:50 AM
I'm thinking that what you've seen are brass "Round Head" screws with a Phillips drive.

However, ever since "Drywall" screws morphed into "Deck Screws" ya'never know what else might be next!

I'm cuirous about what sort of thread the screws you are looking for have. Are they threaded all the way up, like a sheet metal screw? Or are they threaded just part way up, like traditional brass wood screws turned on a Screw Machine? No biggie; just curious.

Moby Nick

N. Scheuer
11-25-2003, 10:50 AM
I'm thinking that what you've seen are brass "Round Head" screws with a Phillips drive.

However, ever since "Drywall" screws morphed into "Deck Screws" ya'never know what else might be next!

I'm cuirous about what sort of thread the screws you are looking for have. Are they threaded all the way up, like a sheet metal screw? Or are they threaded just part way up, like traditional brass wood screws turned on a Screw Machine? No biggie; just curious.

Moby Nick

N. Scheuer
11-25-2003, 10:50 AM
I'm thinking that what you've seen are brass "Round Head" screws with a Phillips drive.

However, ever since "Drywall" screws morphed into "Deck Screws" ya'never know what else might be next!

I'm cuirous about what sort of thread the screws you are looking for have. Are they threaded all the way up, like a sheet metal screw? Or are they threaded just part way up, like traditional brass wood screws turned on a Screw Machine? No biggie; just curious.

Moby Nick

Dale Genther
11-25-2003, 10:57 AM
For lubricating screws I've taken to using Slick Seam. I keep a can in the boat anyway, so I use it for the screws.

Dale Genther
11-25-2003, 10:57 AM
For lubricating screws I've taken to using Slick Seam. I keep a can in the boat anyway, so I use it for the screws.

Dale Genther
11-25-2003, 10:57 AM
For lubricating screws I've taken to using Slick Seam. I keep a can in the boat anyway, so I use it for the screws.