PDA

View Full Version : covering for bow shed



DavidF
02-25-2006, 09:52 AM
Thank you for all the suggestions. I did wait and I did get the plans from Stimson. He was just busy.

I live in central Vermont. The snow can be heavy (although not this year). There is the occassional wind event but normally the winds are not too bad.

I wonder about the minimum size I can get away with. Most of the work will be replacing planks and interior joinery so I don't think I need standing headroom on the deck.

The next step is to decide on the covering. Several interesting suggestions were made. I envision using the shed as a boat workshop for two years and then turn it into a garage.

The griffolyn looks interesting. What is the most durable alternative? What is the most inexpensive alternative? Which is easiest to use? And where can I acquire these materials? I know no one of these will meet all these criteria, but knowing might help me make the best compromise.

I've also wondered about sheething the structure with clapboards. That would really make it look like a boat.

Thank you again for your ideas.

DavidF
02-25-2006, 09:52 AM
Thank you for all the suggestions. I did wait and I did get the plans from Stimson. He was just busy.

I live in central Vermont. The snow can be heavy (although not this year). There is the occassional wind event but normally the winds are not too bad.

I wonder about the minimum size I can get away with. Most of the work will be replacing planks and interior joinery so I don't think I need standing headroom on the deck.

The next step is to decide on the covering. Several interesting suggestions were made. I envision using the shed as a boat workshop for two years and then turn it into a garage.

The griffolyn looks interesting. What is the most durable alternative? What is the most inexpensive alternative? Which is easiest to use? And where can I acquire these materials? I know no one of these will meet all these criteria, but knowing might help me make the best compromise.

I've also wondered about sheething the structure with clapboards. That would really make it look like a boat.

Thank you again for your ideas.

DavidF
02-25-2006, 09:52 AM
Thank you for all the suggestions. I did wait and I did get the plans from Stimson. He was just busy.

I live in central Vermont. The snow can be heavy (although not this year). There is the occassional wind event but normally the winds are not too bad.

I wonder about the minimum size I can get away with. Most of the work will be replacing planks and interior joinery so I don't think I need standing headroom on the deck.

The next step is to decide on the covering. Several interesting suggestions were made. I envision using the shed as a boat workshop for two years and then turn it into a garage.

The griffolyn looks interesting. What is the most durable alternative? What is the most inexpensive alternative? Which is easiest to use? And where can I acquire these materials? I know no one of these will meet all these criteria, but knowing might help me make the best compromise.

I've also wondered about sheething the structure with clapboards. That would really make it look like a boat.

Thank you again for your ideas.

Figment
02-25-2006, 06:14 PM
My first cover was 6mil greenhouse plastic. It seemed like good, durable stuff, but the shed was destroyed in a storm after a few months, so I didn't really get to test it out. the parts that are still there are in good shape, though.

When I rebuilt the shed I was in such a rush that I couldn't wait for more 6mil stuff (try ordering greenhouse supplies in January sometime) and went with the lightweight stuff that's pretty much used for dustcovers and dropcloths. This got me through the winter and spring very well, but by September the UV had done it's thing and it was quite brittle.

I now have a white "shrinkwrap" cover. I couldn't be happier. Because of the shrink-to-fit ability of the material, I haven't even bothered to staple the cover to the bows like I did with the previous covers.. It's laced at the ends and weighted along the long edges.

Don't underestimate the greenhouse effect. Clear material will give you a 15-20 degree boost on a sunny winter day, but WOW it'll be insufferable from May to October.

Figment
02-25-2006, 06:14 PM
My first cover was 6mil greenhouse plastic. It seemed like good, durable stuff, but the shed was destroyed in a storm after a few months, so I didn't really get to test it out. the parts that are still there are in good shape, though.

When I rebuilt the shed I was in such a rush that I couldn't wait for more 6mil stuff (try ordering greenhouse supplies in January sometime) and went with the lightweight stuff that's pretty much used for dustcovers and dropcloths. This got me through the winter and spring very well, but by September the UV had done it's thing and it was quite brittle.

I now have a white "shrinkwrap" cover. I couldn't be happier. Because of the shrink-to-fit ability of the material, I haven't even bothered to staple the cover to the bows like I did with the previous covers.. It's laced at the ends and weighted along the long edges.

Don't underestimate the greenhouse effect. Clear material will give you a 15-20 degree boost on a sunny winter day, but WOW it'll be insufferable from May to October.

Figment
02-25-2006, 06:14 PM
My first cover was 6mil greenhouse plastic. It seemed like good, durable stuff, but the shed was destroyed in a storm after a few months, so I didn't really get to test it out. the parts that are still there are in good shape, though.

When I rebuilt the shed I was in such a rush that I couldn't wait for more 6mil stuff (try ordering greenhouse supplies in January sometime) and went with the lightweight stuff that's pretty much used for dustcovers and dropcloths. This got me through the winter and spring very well, but by September the UV had done it's thing and it was quite brittle.

I now have a white "shrinkwrap" cover. I couldn't be happier. Because of the shrink-to-fit ability of the material, I haven't even bothered to staple the cover to the bows like I did with the previous covers.. It's laced at the ends and weighted along the long edges.

Don't underestimate the greenhouse effect. Clear material will give you a 15-20 degree boost on a sunny winter day, but WOW it'll be insufferable from May to October.

Willin'
02-25-2006, 06:23 PM
If you haven't already, contact the Griffolyn people. Their standard response to all inquiries is to send out swatches. I used the TX-1200 in white, although it comes in clear and black too. Just drove by a neighbor's shed the other day who turned me on to the stuff. Ten years old and looks brand new!

Willin'
02-25-2006, 06:23 PM
If you haven't already, contact the Griffolyn people. Their standard response to all inquiries is to send out swatches. I used the TX-1200 in white, although it comes in clear and black too. Just drove by a neighbor's shed the other day who turned me on to the stuff. Ten years old and looks brand new!

Willin'
02-25-2006, 06:23 PM
If you haven't already, contact the Griffolyn people. Their standard response to all inquiries is to send out swatches. I used the TX-1200 in white, although it comes in clear and black too. Just drove by a neighbor's shed the other day who turned me on to the stuff. Ten years old and looks brand new!

raycon
02-25-2006, 06:50 PM
http://www.klerksusa.com/products/gfilm.htm

I've been using the K-50 Clear 6 mil covering no issues in 3 years.
If you go clear spring/summer and fall you'll want shade. I put a canvas tarp over the ridge that covers about 50% of the surface area to keep the temps tolerable in the summer.

raycon
02-25-2006, 06:50 PM
http://www.klerksusa.com/products/gfilm.htm

I've been using the K-50 Clear 6 mil covering no issues in 3 years.
If you go clear spring/summer and fall you'll want shade. I put a canvas tarp over the ridge that covers about 50% of the surface area to keep the temps tolerable in the summer.

raycon
02-25-2006, 06:50 PM
http://www.klerksusa.com/products/gfilm.htm

I've been using the K-50 Clear 6 mil covering no issues in 3 years.
If you go clear spring/summer and fall you'll want shade. I put a canvas tarp over the ridge that covers about 50% of the surface area to keep the temps tolerable in the summer.

Dolly Varden
02-25-2006, 07:11 PM
i gave you the farm tek address in your other post

id use their 6 mil greenhouse plastic- guranteed for 4 years- you wont find a more durable and less expensive cover anywhere

Dolly Varden
02-25-2006, 07:11 PM
i gave you the farm tek address in your other post

id use their 6 mil greenhouse plastic- guranteed for 4 years- you wont find a more durable and less expensive cover anywhere

Dolly Varden
02-25-2006, 07:11 PM
i gave you the farm tek address in your other post

id use their 6 mil greenhouse plastic- guranteed for 4 years- you wont find a more durable and less expensive cover anywhere

Figment
02-25-2006, 07:16 PM
I actually paid less for the shrinkwrap plastic than I did for the greenhouse stuff, and I had enough leftover to make a cover for a 19' boat.

Figment
02-25-2006, 07:16 PM
I actually paid less for the shrinkwrap plastic than I did for the greenhouse stuff, and I had enough leftover to make a cover for a 19' boat.

Figment
02-25-2006, 07:16 PM
I actually paid less for the shrinkwrap plastic than I did for the greenhouse stuff, and I had enough leftover to make a cover for a 19' boat.

JimConlin
02-25-2006, 09:58 PM
If you're going to be doing substantial interior joinery or deck joinery, it will be a great time-saver to have a 'mezzanine' platform at deck level for a bench and the most frequently used stationary tools.
Margo and Ken Hutchins- didn't you do this?

JimConlin
02-25-2006, 09:58 PM
If you're going to be doing substantial interior joinery or deck joinery, it will be a great time-saver to have a 'mezzanine' platform at deck level for a bench and the most frequently used stationary tools.
Margo and Ken Hutchins- didn't you do this?

JimConlin
02-25-2006, 09:58 PM
If you're going to be doing substantial interior joinery or deck joinery, it will be a great time-saver to have a 'mezzanine' platform at deck level for a bench and the most frequently used stationary tools.
Margo and Ken Hutchins- didn't you do this?

Bob Perkins
02-26-2006, 08:21 AM
On mine - the first year I used the poly sheeting available at home depot (Because I had a big box of it). That stuff was known to only last a a year because it is not UV resistant.

They are right - almost a year to the day it started to shread. It tears up like crepe paper.

I now have the 6mil poly sheeting from Farmtek. 6 months and still going strong. It works great.

Good luck.

Bob Perkins
02-26-2006, 08:21 AM
On mine - the first year I used the poly sheeting available at home depot (Because I had a big box of it). That stuff was known to only last a a year because it is not UV resistant.

They are right - almost a year to the day it started to shread. It tears up like crepe paper.

I now have the 6mil poly sheeting from Farmtek. 6 months and still going strong. It works great.

Good luck.

Bob Perkins
02-26-2006, 08:21 AM
On mine - the first year I used the poly sheeting available at home depot (Because I had a big box of it). That stuff was known to only last a a year because it is not UV resistant.

They are right - almost a year to the day it started to shread. It tears up like crepe paper.

I now have the 6mil poly sheeting from Farmtek. 6 months and still going strong. It works great.

Good luck.

marsbar
02-27-2006, 11:16 AM
My Stimson shed almost completed its second year in NJ. The shrink wrap is holding up, but beginning to see holes here and there. They are easy to fix with shrink wrap tape made for this purpose. Unfortunately, I can only repair the holes from the inside, as the covering does not lend itself to supporting a ladder from the outside. The holes may be a result of the problems I had shrinking the stuff with a Dr. Shrink heat too. Its like striking a finishing nail with a sledge hammer ;). Way too hard to control...but that may just be me. I thinned out the material way too much in places. I'm sure with a proper heat tool, a good job can be achieved. I would use the shrinkwrap again anyday if I had a good heat tool. Seems to hold up quite well, and should be able to get at least 3 years from it......Mark

marsbar
02-27-2006, 11:16 AM
My Stimson shed almost completed its second year in NJ. The shrink wrap is holding up, but beginning to see holes here and there. They are easy to fix with shrink wrap tape made for this purpose. Unfortunately, I can only repair the holes from the inside, as the covering does not lend itself to supporting a ladder from the outside. The holes may be a result of the problems I had shrinking the stuff with a Dr. Shrink heat too. Its like striking a finishing nail with a sledge hammer ;). Way too hard to control...but that may just be me. I thinned out the material way too much in places. I'm sure with a proper heat tool, a good job can be achieved. I would use the shrinkwrap again anyday if I had a good heat tool. Seems to hold up quite well, and should be able to get at least 3 years from it......Mark

marsbar
02-27-2006, 11:16 AM
My Stimson shed almost completed its second year in NJ. The shrink wrap is holding up, but beginning to see holes here and there. They are easy to fix with shrink wrap tape made for this purpose. Unfortunately, I can only repair the holes from the inside, as the covering does not lend itself to supporting a ladder from the outside. The holes may be a result of the problems I had shrinking the stuff with a Dr. Shrink heat too. Its like striking a finishing nail with a sledge hammer ;). Way too hard to control...but that may just be me. I thinned out the material way too much in places. I'm sure with a proper heat tool, a good job can be achieved. I would use the shrinkwrap again anyday if I had a good heat tool. Seems to hold up quite well, and should be able to get at least 3 years from it......Mark

Torna
02-27-2006, 01:26 PM
I too live in Vermont, East Central.

I built a 20x39x20 bow shed a few years back and made the same mistake others have described: The first covering was hardware store 6-mil poly. It lasted 6 months before the sun and wind shredded it. Now have two years on FarmTek 6 mil greenhouse covering and there's no sign of any problem.

I would be happy to show you the shed and swap yarns if you felt like swinging by Thetford sometime.

-leif

Torna
02-27-2006, 01:26 PM
I too live in Vermont, East Central.

I built a 20x39x20 bow shed a few years back and made the same mistake others have described: The first covering was hardware store 6-mil poly. It lasted 6 months before the sun and wind shredded it. Now have two years on FarmTek 6 mil greenhouse covering and there's no sign of any problem.

I would be happy to show you the shed and swap yarns if you felt like swinging by Thetford sometime.

-leif

Torna
02-27-2006, 01:26 PM
I too live in Vermont, East Central.

I built a 20x39x20 bow shed a few years back and made the same mistake others have described: The first covering was hardware store 6-mil poly. It lasted 6 months before the sun and wind shredded it. Now have two years on FarmTek 6 mil greenhouse covering and there's no sign of any problem.

I would be happy to show you the shed and swap yarns if you felt like swinging by Thetford sometime.

-leif