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landlocked sailor
02-02-2001, 12:42 PM
I note in the Dynel thread that one poster stated that he would not use dynel over xynole. Any thoughts? I wish to sheath the bottom of my Tom Hill plywood canoe and my plywood Windward 15 for abrasion resistance while beaching. I also note that Xynole is somewhat less expensive than dynel. Rick

landlocked sailor
02-02-2001, 12:42 PM
I note in the Dynel thread that one poster stated that he would not use dynel over xynole. Any thoughts? I wish to sheath the bottom of my Tom Hill plywood canoe and my plywood Windward 15 for abrasion resistance while beaching. I also note that Xynole is somewhat less expensive than dynel. Rick

landlocked sailor
02-02-2001, 12:42 PM
I note in the Dynel thread that one poster stated that he would not use dynel over xynole. Any thoughts? I wish to sheath the bottom of my Tom Hill plywood canoe and my plywood Windward 15 for abrasion resistance while beaching. I also note that Xynole is somewhat less expensive than dynel. Rick

Eb
02-02-2001, 08:16 PM
I just yesterday ordered 10 yards of xynole for the bottom of a plywood outboard skiff I'm trying to finish up. Never used xynole or dynel but found two different sources that claimed xynloe had slightly less of a tendency to "float" in the epoxy as you apply it. I really found no other reason to pick it over dynel. Maybe others will know.
In a week or two I can tell you how the xynole worked out.

Eb

Eb
02-02-2001, 08:16 PM
I just yesterday ordered 10 yards of xynole for the bottom of a plywood outboard skiff I'm trying to finish up. Never used xynole or dynel but found two different sources that claimed xynloe had slightly less of a tendency to "float" in the epoxy as you apply it. I really found no other reason to pick it over dynel. Maybe others will know.
In a week or two I can tell you how the xynole worked out.

Eb

Eb
02-02-2001, 08:16 PM
I just yesterday ordered 10 yards of xynole for the bottom of a plywood outboard skiff I'm trying to finish up. Never used xynole or dynel but found two different sources that claimed xynloe had slightly less of a tendency to "float" in the epoxy as you apply it. I really found no other reason to pick it over dynel. Maybe others will know.
In a week or two I can tell you how the xynole worked out.

Eb

Steve Lansdowne
02-02-2001, 08:27 PM
Funny, I was thinking about posting your question about 3 days ago, and then I looked at Tom Hill's book again and reviewed the WB Forum postings and decided not to. Hill says he uses Xynole, but sometimes Dynel instead. Most folks on the Forum have mentioned Dynel but not Xynole. I concluded that there are more folks using Dynel and only one vote for Xynole, so I'm putting Dynel on my Whisp. Besides, I already ordered it. I am curious what others will say, though.

Steve Lansdowne
02-02-2001, 08:27 PM
Funny, I was thinking about posting your question about 3 days ago, and then I looked at Tom Hill's book again and reviewed the WB Forum postings and decided not to. Hill says he uses Xynole, but sometimes Dynel instead. Most folks on the Forum have mentioned Dynel but not Xynole. I concluded that there are more folks using Dynel and only one vote for Xynole, so I'm putting Dynel on my Whisp. Besides, I already ordered it. I am curious what others will say, though.

Steve Lansdowne
02-02-2001, 08:27 PM
Funny, I was thinking about posting your question about 3 days ago, and then I looked at Tom Hill's book again and reviewed the WB Forum postings and decided not to. Hill says he uses Xynole, but sometimes Dynel instead. Most folks on the Forum have mentioned Dynel but not Xynole. I concluded that there are more folks using Dynel and only one vote for Xynole, so I'm putting Dynel on my Whisp. Besides, I already ordered it. I am curious what others will say, though.

Eb
02-02-2001, 10:31 PM
Steve,

Cool timing. Let me know how your dynel works out and I'll let you know about the xynole, then Rick can make the best choice for him.

Eb

Eb
02-02-2001, 10:31 PM
Steve,

Cool timing. Let me know how your dynel works out and I'll let you know about the xynole, then Rick can make the best choice for him.

Eb

Eb
02-02-2001, 10:31 PM
Steve,

Cool timing. Let me know how your dynel works out and I'll let you know about the xynole, then Rick can make the best choice for him.

Eb

landlocked sailor
02-03-2001, 11:19 AM
Sounds good to me. Doug Wilde had good success with dynel on his Windward 15. Rick

landlocked sailor
02-03-2001, 11:19 AM
Sounds good to me. Doug Wilde had good success with dynel on his Windward 15. Rick

landlocked sailor
02-03-2001, 11:19 AM
Sounds good to me. Doug Wilde had good success with dynel on his Windward 15. Rick

J. Labaree
02-05-2001, 12:50 PM
I'm looking to put dynel on the sole of a plywood skiff I'm building. I'd love a source for it. Jamestown doesn't appear to carry it. Where are you dynel users getting it?

Direct email would be fine:

jlabaree@mcht.org

J. Labaree
02-05-2001, 12:50 PM
I'm looking to put dynel on the sole of a plywood skiff I'm building. I'd love a source for it. Jamestown doesn't appear to carry it. Where are you dynel users getting it?

Direct email would be fine:

jlabaree@mcht.org

J. Labaree
02-05-2001, 12:50 PM
I'm looking to put dynel on the sole of a plywood skiff I'm building. I'd love a source for it. Jamestown doesn't appear to carry it. Where are you dynel users getting it?

Direct email would be fine:

jlabaree@mcht.org

Mark Van
02-05-2001, 06:05 PM
I think Defender is the only place you can get it.
www.defenderus.com (http://www.defenderus.com)
(I think)
Mark

Mark Van
02-05-2001, 06:05 PM
I think Defender is the only place you can get it.
www.defenderus.com (http://www.defenderus.com)
(I think)
Mark

Mark Van
02-05-2001, 06:05 PM
I think Defender is the only place you can get it.
www.defenderus.com (http://www.defenderus.com)
(I think)
Mark

J. Labaree
02-06-2001, 04:10 PM
Thanks Mark!

- Jonathan

J. Labaree
02-06-2001, 04:10 PM
Thanks Mark!

- Jonathan

J. Labaree
02-06-2001, 04:10 PM
Thanks Mark!

- Jonathan

Eb
02-19-2001, 01:37 PM
Well the xynole is on.

I love it.

When it arrived I had my doubts as it looks quite different from glass cloth. Reminds me of gauze, looks like white plastic window screening yet is soft and flexible.

Two 15' long X 60" wide pieces layed over the hull and conformed to the compound curves of the two chines and stem perfectly (doubled over the 24" wide bottom, leaving just one seam along one lower chine and the stem.)

Rolling on epoxy resin did not work for me, the roller would lift and pull the fabric, but pouring on epoxy then lightly moving it around with a squeegie worked great. After a minute or so both the ply and xynole were saturated and I could use lots of pressure on the squeegie to remove the excess resin and drag it to another area of dry cloth, leaving the weave half full. I got all ten yards of the xynole wet out in about 2 1/2 hours, no hurry, not a single wrinkle, and no darts necessary.

After a lunch break, the epoxy was just tacky enough that I rolled on a coat of epoxy that filled the weave.

Next day I sanded down the ridge from the overlapping seam and the build-up around the transom. Tough stuff, I see now why folks say it is so abrasion resistant. And no glass dust, that in itself is worth it.

Anyway, I'm a hooked now, it's Xynole for any future hull sheathing. No more glass cloth other than biaxial tape for seams, and that I cover with peelply which keeps it smooth, ---so no more glass dust!!!

That is, unless dynel proves to be better than xynole, hard to see how it could be.

I have a couple of square feet of xynole scraps, anyone wanna trade for a bit of dynel so we can compare?

Eb

Eb
02-19-2001, 01:37 PM
Well the xynole is on.

I love it.

When it arrived I had my doubts as it looks quite different from glass cloth. Reminds me of gauze, looks like white plastic window screening yet is soft and flexible.

Two 15' long X 60" wide pieces layed over the hull and conformed to the compound curves of the two chines and stem perfectly (doubled over the 24" wide bottom, leaving just one seam along one lower chine and the stem.)

Rolling on epoxy resin did not work for me, the roller would lift and pull the fabric, but pouring on epoxy then lightly moving it around with a squeegie worked great. After a minute or so both the ply and xynole were saturated and I could use lots of pressure on the squeegie to remove the excess resin and drag it to another area of dry cloth, leaving the weave half full. I got all ten yards of the xynole wet out in about 2 1/2 hours, no hurry, not a single wrinkle, and no darts necessary.

After a lunch break, the epoxy was just tacky enough that I rolled on a coat of epoxy that filled the weave.

Next day I sanded down the ridge from the overlapping seam and the build-up around the transom. Tough stuff, I see now why folks say it is so abrasion resistant. And no glass dust, that in itself is worth it.

Anyway, I'm a hooked now, it's Xynole for any future hull sheathing. No more glass cloth other than biaxial tape for seams, and that I cover with peelply which keeps it smooth, ---so no more glass dust!!!

That is, unless dynel proves to be better than xynole, hard to see how it could be.

I have a couple of square feet of xynole scraps, anyone wanna trade for a bit of dynel so we can compare?

Eb

Eb
02-19-2001, 01:37 PM
Well the xynole is on.

I love it.

When it arrived I had my doubts as it looks quite different from glass cloth. Reminds me of gauze, looks like white plastic window screening yet is soft and flexible.

Two 15' long X 60" wide pieces layed over the hull and conformed to the compound curves of the two chines and stem perfectly (doubled over the 24" wide bottom, leaving just one seam along one lower chine and the stem.)

Rolling on epoxy resin did not work for me, the roller would lift and pull the fabric, but pouring on epoxy then lightly moving it around with a squeegie worked great. After a minute or so both the ply and xynole were saturated and I could use lots of pressure on the squeegie to remove the excess resin and drag it to another area of dry cloth, leaving the weave half full. I got all ten yards of the xynole wet out in about 2 1/2 hours, no hurry, not a single wrinkle, and no darts necessary.

After a lunch break, the epoxy was just tacky enough that I rolled on a coat of epoxy that filled the weave.

Next day I sanded down the ridge from the overlapping seam and the build-up around the transom. Tough stuff, I see now why folks say it is so abrasion resistant. And no glass dust, that in itself is worth it.

Anyway, I'm a hooked now, it's Xynole for any future hull sheathing. No more glass cloth other than biaxial tape for seams, and that I cover with peelply which keeps it smooth, ---so no more glass dust!!!

That is, unless dynel proves to be better than xynole, hard to see how it could be.

I have a couple of square feet of xynole scraps, anyone wanna trade for a bit of dynel so we can compare?

Eb

Lazy Jack
02-19-2001, 04:05 PM
I used Xynole on the outside of my plywood dory. Very easy stuff to work with but drinks up boatloads of epoxy as compared to fiberglass! Took about four gallons of epoxy wet out the bottom and bottom two strakes and fill the weave including the final few coats with the aluminum powder. I would have to think hard before using it again. Awesome protection but sure does add weight!

Lazy Jack
02-19-2001, 04:05 PM
I used Xynole on the outside of my plywood dory. Very easy stuff to work with but drinks up boatloads of epoxy as compared to fiberglass! Took about four gallons of epoxy wet out the bottom and bottom two strakes and fill the weave including the final few coats with the aluminum powder. I would have to think hard before using it again. Awesome protection but sure does add weight!

Lazy Jack
02-19-2001, 04:05 PM
I used Xynole on the outside of my plywood dory. Very easy stuff to work with but drinks up boatloads of epoxy as compared to fiberglass! Took about four gallons of epoxy wet out the bottom and bottom two strakes and fill the weave including the final few coats with the aluminum powder. I would have to think hard before using it again. Awesome protection but sure does add weight!

Mark Van
02-19-2001, 06:36 PM
I had no trouble rolling the epoxy on the Xynole. The roller likes to pick up the cloth when you first start, but once you get a few square feet saturated, it behaves. I did not coat the wood before applying the cloth. I used the cheap black foam rollers, not the expensive ones from WEST. I read somewhere that they shouldn't be used with epoxy, but I haven't had any problems with them.
Mark

Mark Van
02-19-2001, 06:36 PM
I had no trouble rolling the epoxy on the Xynole. The roller likes to pick up the cloth when you first start, but once you get a few square feet saturated, it behaves. I did not coat the wood before applying the cloth. I used the cheap black foam rollers, not the expensive ones from WEST. I read somewhere that they shouldn't be used with epoxy, but I haven't had any problems with them.
Mark

Mark Van
02-19-2001, 06:36 PM
I had no trouble rolling the epoxy on the Xynole. The roller likes to pick up the cloth when you first start, but once you get a few square feet saturated, it behaves. I did not coat the wood before applying the cloth. I used the cheap black foam rollers, not the expensive ones from WEST. I read somewhere that they shouldn't be used with epoxy, but I haven't had any problems with them.
Mark