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View Full Version : Lithium-Ion Batteries (Dremel #800)



cs
12-31-2003, 11:13 AM
Needed to replace my corder Dremel, being as it died, so I showed the wife which one I wanted. So she buys me the cordless model #800 for Christmas. I had wanted a corded Dremel but she got what she thought was best, which is fine by me.

On to the question. This Dremel has a 10.8 volt Lithium-Ion battery. The one thing I like about corded is not having to worry about batteries dieing when needed the most. Normally with battery operated stuff I run it till it dies than put it on the charge. Of course with having only one battery for the Dremel that can be a royal PIA when I need it. So should I keep the battery on the charge all the time and only take it off when needed (like a cordless screwdriver) or should I bite the bullet and buy a new battery and always have a fresh one charged?

Chad

cs
12-31-2003, 11:13 AM
Needed to replace my corder Dremel, being as it died, so I showed the wife which one I wanted. So she buys me the cordless model #800 for Christmas. I had wanted a corded Dremel but she got what she thought was best, which is fine by me.

On to the question. This Dremel has a 10.8 volt Lithium-Ion battery. The one thing I like about corded is not having to worry about batteries dieing when needed the most. Normally with battery operated stuff I run it till it dies than put it on the charge. Of course with having only one battery for the Dremel that can be a royal PIA when I need it. So should I keep the battery on the charge all the time and only take it off when needed (like a cordless screwdriver) or should I bite the bullet and buy a new battery and always have a fresh one charged?

Chad

cs
12-31-2003, 11:13 AM
Needed to replace my corder Dremel, being as it died, so I showed the wife which one I wanted. So she buys me the cordless model #800 for Christmas. I had wanted a corded Dremel but she got what she thought was best, which is fine by me.

On to the question. This Dremel has a 10.8 volt Lithium-Ion battery. The one thing I like about corded is not having to worry about batteries dieing when needed the most. Normally with battery operated stuff I run it till it dies than put it on the charge. Of course with having only one battery for the Dremel that can be a royal PIA when I need it. So should I keep the battery on the charge all the time and only take it off when needed (like a cordless screwdriver) or should I bite the bullet and buy a new battery and always have a fresh one charged?

Chad

Meerkat
12-31-2003, 05:53 PM
It depends on the exact chemistry of the lithium battery: some lithium batteries, if they are left fully discharged for long (few days), will never take a charge again. This may be more of a characteristic of older technology lithium than new. (I know this because Compaq bought me a new iPaq after shipping such a battery in the first generation iPaq I bought and forgetting to tell anyone about this nasty habbit.)

I do not think it would hurt and I do think it would be a good idea to let it live on a charger when not in use.

Meerkat
12-31-2003, 05:53 PM
It depends on the exact chemistry of the lithium battery: some lithium batteries, if they are left fully discharged for long (few days), will never take a charge again. This may be more of a characteristic of older technology lithium than new. (I know this because Compaq bought me a new iPaq after shipping such a battery in the first generation iPaq I bought and forgetting to tell anyone about this nasty habbit.)

I do not think it would hurt and I do think it would be a good idea to let it live on a charger when not in use.

Meerkat
12-31-2003, 05:53 PM
It depends on the exact chemistry of the lithium battery: some lithium batteries, if they are left fully discharged for long (few days), will never take a charge again. This may be more of a characteristic of older technology lithium than new. (I know this because Compaq bought me a new iPaq after shipping such a battery in the first generation iPaq I bought and forgetting to tell anyone about this nasty habbit.)

I do not think it would hurt and I do think it would be a good idea to let it live on a charger when not in use.

htom
01-01-2004, 07:22 PM
a. Fully charge battery 1. Put in tool.

b. Fully charge battery 2, remove from charger.

c. Now, you've used the tool, place the used battery in the charger and put the charged battery in the tool. Continue using, or put the tool with the fresh battery away.

d. Remove the charging battery when it's done.

e. Pick up tool, use, go to (c).

You can extend this to three batteries, but it's more of a pain to keep track of the battery states; this scheme, the one in the tool is ready to use, the other is charging or charged.

htom
01-01-2004, 07:22 PM
a. Fully charge battery 1. Put in tool.

b. Fully charge battery 2, remove from charger.

c. Now, you've used the tool, place the used battery in the charger and put the charged battery in the tool. Continue using, or put the tool with the fresh battery away.

d. Remove the charging battery when it's done.

e. Pick up tool, use, go to (c).

You can extend this to three batteries, but it's more of a pain to keep track of the battery states; this scheme, the one in the tool is ready to use, the other is charging or charged.

htom
01-01-2004, 07:22 PM
a. Fully charge battery 1. Put in tool.

b. Fully charge battery 2, remove from charger.

c. Now, you've used the tool, place the used battery in the charger and put the charged battery in the tool. Continue using, or put the tool with the fresh battery away.

d. Remove the charging battery when it's done.

e. Pick up tool, use, go to (c).

You can extend this to three batteries, but it's more of a pain to keep track of the battery states; this scheme, the one in the tool is ready to use, the other is charging or charged.

cs
01-02-2004, 07:32 AM
Okay I got one for leaving on the charger and 2 for buying a second battery. Guess I need to look and find out how much a second battery cost.

Chad

cs
01-02-2004, 07:32 AM
Okay I got one for leaving on the charger and 2 for buying a second battery. Guess I need to look and find out how much a second battery cost.

Chad

cs
01-02-2004, 07:32 AM
Okay I got one for leaving on the charger and 2 for buying a second battery. Guess I need to look and find out how much a second battery cost.

Chad

htom
01-06-2004, 12:41 PM
Two batteries will work better, it's just a question of whether to recharge when you're done using (minimal use of battery before recharge) or when the tool slows down (maximal use before recharge, not down to "dead".)

All of the lithium, as I understand it, are float batteries (minimal use.) Ni-Cads can be designed either way, and we have no way to find out how Dremel has designed theirs. I use one until the tool slows, then change, using Ni-Cads, assuming that they are not float charge (I have no good reason for making that assumption.)

htom
01-06-2004, 12:41 PM
Two batteries will work better, it's just a question of whether to recharge when you're done using (minimal use of battery before recharge) or when the tool slows down (maximal use before recharge, not down to "dead".)

All of the lithium, as I understand it, are float batteries (minimal use.) Ni-Cads can be designed either way, and we have no way to find out how Dremel has designed theirs. I use one until the tool slows, then change, using Ni-Cads, assuming that they are not float charge (I have no good reason for making that assumption.)

htom
01-06-2004, 12:41 PM
Two batteries will work better, it's just a question of whether to recharge when you're done using (minimal use of battery before recharge) or when the tool slows down (maximal use before recharge, not down to "dead".)

All of the lithium, as I understand it, are float batteries (minimal use.) Ni-Cads can be designed either way, and we have no way to find out how Dremel has designed theirs. I use one until the tool slows, then change, using Ni-Cads, assuming that they are not float charge (I have no good reason for making that assumption.)

cs
01-06-2004, 01:02 PM
The Dremal tool is designed not to slow down, but to run full speed until low and than the tool shuts off. This is to keep from damaging the tool, I think.

Chad

cs
01-06-2004, 01:02 PM
The Dremal tool is designed not to slow down, but to run full speed until low and than the tool shuts off. This is to keep from damaging the tool, I think.

Chad

cs
01-06-2004, 01:02 PM
The Dremal tool is designed not to slow down, but to run full speed until low and than the tool shuts off. This is to keep from damaging the tool, I think.

Chad

Meerkat
01-07-2004, 03:34 AM
Originally posted by cs:
The Dremal tool is designed not to slow down, but to run full speed until low and than the tool shuts off. This is to keep from damaging the tool, I think.

ChadIf the Dremal's battery is lithium, that's a characteristic of lithium chemistry - it has a very flat discharge curve until it's nearly exhausted. Makes it very cheap and easy to build in a circuit that will shut it off when it sees the voltage drop.

Meerkat
01-07-2004, 03:34 AM
Originally posted by cs:
The Dremal tool is designed not to slow down, but to run full speed until low and than the tool shuts off. This is to keep from damaging the tool, I think.

ChadIf the Dremal's battery is lithium, that's a characteristic of lithium chemistry - it has a very flat discharge curve until it's nearly exhausted. Makes it very cheap and easy to build in a circuit that will shut it off when it sees the voltage drop.

Meerkat
01-07-2004, 03:34 AM
Originally posted by cs:
The Dremal tool is designed not to slow down, but to run full speed until low and than the tool shuts off. This is to keep from damaging the tool, I think.

ChadIf the Dremal's battery is lithium, that's a characteristic of lithium chemistry - it has a very flat discharge curve until it's nearly exhausted. Makes it very cheap and easy to build in a circuit that will shut it off when it sees the voltage drop.