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Memphis Mike
03-14-2015, 03:56 PM
Was looking at them today. I've never been a fan of a gas grill. I used to own one and pushed it out to the street after it rusted out. I really don't see the point in the new ones. None of them use lava rock and seem to me to be nothing more than a big outdoor gas burner. How does one get that charcoal flavor on one of these? Some are priced at 2000 dollars and better. I bet I could cook a better polecat on a spit over an outdoor fire.

ahp
03-15-2015, 09:47 PM
We own the cheapest Walmart offered. We used a few times to get the hang of it. The only real reason to have it was in case we had an extended power outage.

Breakaway
03-15-2015, 09:54 PM
The whole lava rock thing is a scam. Its the smoke from the grease gives the flavor. Grease drips, flares up, adds flavor. So rocks, or metal bars or the helmets of enslaved Martians all work the same.

A charcoal grill will impart the coal flavor, but that is another thing again.

I like my gas grill. Its quick. It doesn't heat up the kitchen. It provides backup/auxiliary cooking.

Mine's a Weber, and all the parts can be had for it at my local hardware ( True Value) or Home Depot. Its 13 years old, has always lived 300 feet from saltwater. I've replaced the grates twice, the "flavorizer bars once," the electric starter once. The frame, lid, body are all in great shape.

Kevin

Captain Intrepid
03-15-2015, 09:59 PM
It's hard to beat a gas BBQ when you spontaneously just feel like BBQing something quickly.

L.W. Baxter
03-15-2015, 10:03 PM
Got mine from Sears 15+ years ago for maybe $150. Replaced the burner once. Very effective for certain kinds of cooking. Great backup to the kitchen stove.

S.V. Airlie
03-15-2015, 10:05 PM
Was looking at them today. I've never been a fan of a gas grill. I used to own one and pushed it out to the street after it rusted out. I really don't see the point in the new ones. None of them use lava rock and seem to me to be nothing more than a big outdoor gas burner. How does one get that charcoal flavor on one of these? Some are priced at 2000 dollars and better. I bet I could cook a better polecat on a spit over an outdoor fire.My grill has two sections; one gas, the other one charcoal or wood! I've used both. I like both but, obviously the gas one is a lot cleaner! Not a big problem but,...

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
03-15-2015, 10:18 PM
Food cooked over a wooden campfire tastes best.
I learned that in the Boy Scouts.

Nicholas Carey
03-15-2015, 10:21 PM
Was looking at them today. I've never been a fan of a gas grill.

That is because you are a right-thinking man from a place that understands barbecue. Being an adherent of the vinegar-based sect from the Carolinas myself, I won't go into the righteousness — or its lack — of Memphis barbecue, but you guys understand it. Anyway, I digress.

I used to own one and pushed it out to the street after it rusted out. I really don't see the point in the new ones. None of them use lava rock and seem to me to be nothing more than a big outdoor gas burner. How does one get that charcoal flavor on one of these? Some are priced at 2000 dollars and better. I bet I could cook a better polecat on a spit over an outdoor fire.[/QUOTE]

Well, Cook's Illustrated reviews gas barbecues and for years (couple of decades), the Weber Genesis line has always garnered top place. I think the Genesis Silver is probably the happy place — the Genesis Gold gets a little silly price-wise.

I have a Weber charcoal grill, the Weber Performer, that has a propane ignition system. It mixes the best of both charcoal and gas. I fire lump charcoal: load the charcoal, hit the gas and press the starter and you are literally ready to cook in 10—15 minutes.

http://www.weber.com/grills/series/performer/performer-deluxe-22

Todd Bradshaw
03-15-2015, 11:39 PM
After having three gas grills rust out in the last fifteen years or so, we bought a Weber gas grill last year. I was rather surprised that other than the aluminum bowl and lid and the iron grates, most of the rest of it is polyethylene. Then I realized that our Rubbermaid polyethylene garbage can has outlived all three of our previous gas grills. The new one seems to work fine for steaks, burgers, brats and other stuff when you don't have much time. Slower, more interesting stuff usually gets done on the smoker.

Glen Longino
03-15-2015, 11:49 PM
Food cooked over a wooden campfire tastes best.
I learned that in the Boy Scouts.

Same here! Oak, mesquite, pecan around here.

oznabrag
03-16-2015, 12:08 AM
The whole lava rock thing is a scam. Its the smoke from the grease gives the flavor. Grease drips, flares up, adds flavor. So rocks, or metal bars or the helmets of enslaved Martians all work the same.

A charcoal grill will impart the coal flavor, but that is another thing again.

I like my gas grill. Its quick. It doesn't heat up the kitchen. It provides backup/auxiliary cooking.

Mine's a Weber, and all the parts can be had for it at my local hardware ( True Value) or Home Depot. Its 13 years old, has always lived 300 feet from saltwater. I've replaced the grates twice, the "flavorizer bars once," the electric starter once. The frame, lid, body are all in great shape.

Kevin

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/d/d5/Marvin_the_Martian.svg/594px-Marvin_the_Martian.svg.png

Glen Longino
03-16-2015, 12:37 AM
My all time favorite cooking spot is a fire pit 40 yards from the house.
I have a steel grate supported by rocks over the coals.
Occasionally, I'll get a good heavy ribeye and cook it out there and slice off pieces of it with my knife as it cooks....and drink a beer.

Robbie 2
03-16-2015, 04:09 AM
I used to own one and pushed it out to the street after it rusted out.

Me too BUT when it rusted out I removed all the BBQ related stuff and put on a wooden deck
It is now a movable work bench with a good sized tray underneath for storing tools,fasteners and parts etc.

Canoez
03-16-2015, 07:59 AM
While I much prefer natural lump charcoal or an actual hardwood fire for cooking on, convenience has me cooking on a Weber gas grill. It's nice in the summer to keep the heat out of the house, but gets used year 'round. I don't have a dedicated smoker, but do have a smoker box that I use with the gas grill. You can do quite a good job smoking meats low and slow with indirect heat and the box. I've had this one for about 10 years - it's starting to show it's age in spots (frame issues, mostly), but gets covered between uses which seems to help them last longer, IME.

Figment
03-16-2015, 08:14 AM
I have the weber charcoal/gas hybrid mentioned in #8 above, and I love it enough that I rebuilt 80% of it after it got assaulted by falling ice last year. A big ol messy pile of lump coal in that baby is just a thing of beauty.

Having said that, I'm giving up on trying to get Wifey Dear on board with loading and starting it (so that it's ready to cook when I get home from work and we can eat at a reasonable hour). I'm keeping an eye open for a deal on one of these little electric dudes.
http://cdn.toptenreviews.com/rev/scrn/large/52744-patio-bistro7.jpg
Blasphemous though they may be, they're good enough for those quick burger/dog weeknights, and they do perform that all-critical function of keeping the heat out of the kitchen in the summertime.

The Weber will be reserved for properly-paced weekend cooking.

oznabrag
03-16-2015, 08:29 AM
I have the weber charcoal/gas hybrid mentioned in #8 above, and I love it enough that I rebuilt 80% of it after it got assaulted by falling ice last year. A big ol messy pile of lump coal in that baby is just a thing of beauty.

Having said that, I'm giving up on trying to get Wifey Dear on board with loading and starting it (so that it's ready to cook when I get home from work and we can eat at a reasonable hour). I'm keeping an eye open for a deal on one of these little electric dudes.
...
Blasphemous though they may be, they're good enough for those quick burger/dog weeknights, and they do perform that all-critical function of keeping the heat out of the kitchen in the summertime.

The Weber will be reserved for properly-paced weekend cooking.

Being as you're giving up, I must assume that you have tried to load it, and leave her with pushing the igniter.

Canoez
03-16-2015, 08:31 AM
Being as you're giving up, I must assume that you have tried to load it, and leave her with pushing the igniter.

Can't be done even with the gas grill and built-in igniter. Seems the Y-Chromosome thing has an effect here. SWMBO doesn't ever want to cook on fire.

jonboy
03-16-2015, 08:36 AM
What is bbq-ing? who would bbq in a kitchen? if you aren't going to cook on a wood fire or charcoal if you really have to, why don't you just cook the food on the cooker.
I recently went to pal's bbq where the fire was charcoal in a half oil drum with a big steel plate on the top, he couldn't understand why he wasn't just frying .
And as for the remark that you want the speed of a one of those gas jobs, what kind of lifestyle is it when you can't wait fifteen minutes or so .....
with a bit of dry kindling and small bits of dry wood and a bellows or piece of cardboard I guarantee I will get a bbq going in the time it takes you drag those not-a-bbqs out of the shed. and two grand!!! you have to be kidding. sounds like impress the neighbours.

Canoez
03-16-2015, 08:40 AM
And as for the remark that you want the speed of a one of those gas jobs, what kind of lifestyle is it when you can't wait fifteen minutes or so .....


A really busy one. Besides, as Figgy points out, depending on what you're cooking, good BBQ can take hours over low heat.

Jim Mahan
03-16-2015, 08:52 AM
I used to be a die-hard Weber charcoal user. A lot of dirty fussing around, but a really good way to cook stuff. What I noticed is that, for me, it takes several sessions in the new season to get back in the groove, getting all the parameters just right. The amount of charcoal, the way to get it started and burning just right. And it always seems to be the case that, no matter what, the coals are just perfect right after the steaks are done. When I shared an apartment briefly with my younger brother, I learned to use a hair dryer to turn a pyramid of cold black charcoal into a blazing glowing pile of orange heat in about a minute. But when I moved in with HER, we had to get a gas grill, and I had the same question as MMike. Kevin has it right. We've been using a Vermont Castings four burner for eight or nine years now, and I have no problem rating it a huge improvement over the charcoal.

I had a friend a while back whose practice, much like Glen's, was to make a small depression in the ground, just away from the back porch, put a cinderblock on either side, and a small iron grate across that, above a fairly small wood fire. Friends, drinks, smokes, grilled meat, home-made rock and roll, on a Friday after work. Finastkind.

When I finish my suspended deck, part of the furniture will be a small, hardwood fired, brazier in the center, suitable for a burger or oysters, or just a late fall evening's contemplation.

jonboy
03-16-2015, 09:02 AM
I have a confession....there's a time when power-assisted cooking works. A transom-slung gas driven grill does beat the competition for grilling fish on the boat. I do have a really nifty folding stainless grill that works with charcoal, folds away to about the size of this laptop, but the charcoal storage and transportation is a pain on a boat, but unbeatable for the landfall or beach. Apart from a pit and a few rocks.

Figment
03-16-2015, 09:03 AM
And as for the remark that you want the speed of a one of those gas jobs, what kind of lifestyle is it when you can't wait fifteen minutes or so .....


Not necessarily busy, but constrained by certain realities. The window of time between me arriving home from work and starting the process of putting littlegirl to bed is about 75 minutes. If 30 of those minutes are spent lighting/heating/waiting before the actual cooking even begins, the needle on the domesticharmonymeter moves left.

And yes, we've tried having the basket loaded with coals waiting for the pushbutton gas lighter. No go. The moderate whooomp sound of the ignition is quite offputting.

bobbys
03-16-2015, 09:40 AM
My all time favorite cooking spot is a fire pit 40 yards from the house.
I have a steel grate supported by rocks over the coals.
Occasionally, I'll get a good heavy ribeye and cook it out there and slice off pieces of it with my knife as it cooks....and drink a beer.
.

There is still hope for you with this insight into Glen's world..

For awhile I thought you were leaning towards white wine, bean sprouts, and meals with French names.

Canoeyawl
03-16-2015, 10:59 AM
I use a little stainless marine BBQ. Gas fired, converted to use a five gallon bottle hidden under the porch, it is permanently clamped onto the railing outside the kitchen door. I add a little bit of water soaked wood to it down in the corner, just underneath the flame. It just smokes, no flame. Perfect.

Years ago I was cruising Wayne Hamilton's store and saw these little packets of Olive wood marked down to 50 cents. I asked Wayne, "What the heck are these for?" And he said "the barbecue" so ever since I've used my band saw to cut up chucks of wood that may taste good and add a small piece to the gas unit and Voila - we have smoke, and the propane taste is gone. Apple wood, Oak bark, and Olive are all available here for the taking, as much as one could need.

Michael D. Storey
03-17-2015, 06:16 PM
It's hard to beat a gas BBQ when you spontaneously just feel like BBQing something quickly.

Everso, and the only reason that there is one at Choptank. I found it at the dump. I brought it home to yank all the stainless off of it, but The Judith saw it first. In reality, that chemical that is put into the gas so that you can smell a leak slithers skyward, but runs into your food first. Yum City, Man

And, bricquettes are made out of charcoal and coal, and flour and water. Coal, gentle reader, is a good source of sulphur and heavy metals.

Actually, it is possible to make a fire without chemicals and without paper, and use it to ignite charcoal. Or, use it to light bigger pieces of hardwood, which can be burned down to make a fine bed of coals that will, in fact, cook food.

Trust Me.

No. Wait. Forget that part.

Paul Pless
03-17-2015, 06:21 PM
BBQing something quickly.oxymoron!

Memphis Mike
03-17-2015, 06:22 PM
My all time favorite cooking spot is a fire pit 40 yards from the house.
I have a steel grate supported by rocks over the coals.
Occasionally, I'll get a good heavy ribeye and cook it out there and slice off pieces of it with my knife as it cooks....and drink a beer.

I like the idea of that Glen. Imma gonna come down and we can cook us up a mess of prairie dog.

Michael D. Storey
03-17-2015, 06:24 PM
oxymoron!

Who you callin an oxy?

Phil Y
03-17-2015, 06:26 PM
I've got 3 really nice gas grills I picked up on the sidewalks over the years. Very happy with them.

bobbys
03-17-2015, 06:32 PM
I get all my grills, furniture , lawn mowers and bedding from the curb.

Memphis Mike
03-17-2015, 06:46 PM
I get all my grills, furniture , lawn mowers and bedding from the curb.

I guess you're no stranger to bed bugs then.... or maybe vice versa.

Breakaway
03-17-2015, 07:22 PM
In reality, that chemical that is put into the gas so that you can smell a leak slithers skyward, but runs into your food first. Yum City, Ma

Ethyl Mercaptan

Do you know you can get FREE scratch-and-sniff ethyl mercaptan sheets from propane association? To help recognize the smell. Free! As many as you want! What a country.

http://www.suhresgas.com/help/LP_GAS_ORORIZATION_INFO.html

Kevin

EDIT: added link.

bobbys
03-17-2015, 08:27 PM
I guess you're no stranger to bed bugs then.... or maybe vice versa.
.

And here I thought I wuz on Yer ignore list!