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View Full Version : feasability of freighting wood



C Reid
03-22-2001, 03:53 PM
Has anyone looked into the feasability of bringing south american hardwoods up north? I know a lot of liveaboards try to carry some freight to pay expenses. Im thinking carrying a load of zebrawood or whatever (things people here have never even heard of) could be both lucrative and very appreciated by people who want to add those special touches to their boats..

C Reid
03-22-2001, 03:53 PM
Has anyone looked into the feasability of bringing south american hardwoods up north? I know a lot of liveaboards try to carry some freight to pay expenses. Im thinking carrying a load of zebrawood or whatever (things people here have never even heard of) could be both lucrative and very appreciated by people who want to add those special touches to their boats..

C Reid
03-22-2001, 03:53 PM
Has anyone looked into the feasability of bringing south american hardwoods up north? I know a lot of liveaboards try to carry some freight to pay expenses. Im thinking carrying a load of zebrawood or whatever (things people here have never even heard of) could be both lucrative and very appreciated by people who want to add those special touches to their boats..

gashmore
03-23-2001, 08:16 AM
Many years ago an over enthusiastic woodworker friend talked a group of us into flying down to Costa Rica to go deep sea fishing and buy a container worth of exotics. GAWD! What a nightmare.

We bought about $10,000 worth of logs. Teak, cocobolo, Spanish cedar, monkyepod and several other species I had never seen before. That part was easy and the prices were great. Then we heard that it would be easier to import as lumber than logs so we had to find a sawyer and get the logs moved. Then we had to find a freight forwarder and arange for the container and shipping.

I had to fly down 3 times to straighten out hang ups. After about 3 months, I got a call from a very upset freight forwarder in Charleston wanting to know about import permits for sawn lumber that I had never heard of.

In the end we about broke even and each of us got a nice stash of exotics. In fact, I am using some of the cedar and teak on this project but I would never do it again. To make it worth the effort, you need to ship several containers worth of lumber and know all the ins and outs of the business.

You definitely will not make any money importing a few hundred board feet.

BTW, the fishing was great and we claimed it as a business expense.<g>

gashmore
03-23-2001, 08:16 AM
Many years ago an over enthusiastic woodworker friend talked a group of us into flying down to Costa Rica to go deep sea fishing and buy a container worth of exotics. GAWD! What a nightmare.

We bought about $10,000 worth of logs. Teak, cocobolo, Spanish cedar, monkyepod and several other species I had never seen before. That part was easy and the prices were great. Then we heard that it would be easier to import as lumber than logs so we had to find a sawyer and get the logs moved. Then we had to find a freight forwarder and arange for the container and shipping.

I had to fly down 3 times to straighten out hang ups. After about 3 months, I got a call from a very upset freight forwarder in Charleston wanting to know about import permits for sawn lumber that I had never heard of.

In the end we about broke even and each of us got a nice stash of exotics. In fact, I am using some of the cedar and teak on this project but I would never do it again. To make it worth the effort, you need to ship several containers worth of lumber and know all the ins and outs of the business.

You definitely will not make any money importing a few hundred board feet.

BTW, the fishing was great and we claimed it as a business expense.<g>

gashmore
03-23-2001, 08:16 AM
Many years ago an over enthusiastic woodworker friend talked a group of us into flying down to Costa Rica to go deep sea fishing and buy a container worth of exotics. GAWD! What a nightmare.

We bought about $10,000 worth of logs. Teak, cocobolo, Spanish cedar, monkyepod and several other species I had never seen before. That part was easy and the prices were great. Then we heard that it would be easier to import as lumber than logs so we had to find a sawyer and get the logs moved. Then we had to find a freight forwarder and arange for the container and shipping.

I had to fly down 3 times to straighten out hang ups. After about 3 months, I got a call from a very upset freight forwarder in Charleston wanting to know about import permits for sawn lumber that I had never heard of.

In the end we about broke even and each of us got a nice stash of exotics. In fact, I am using some of the cedar and teak on this project but I would never do it again. To make it worth the effort, you need to ship several containers worth of lumber and know all the ins and outs of the business.

You definitely will not make any money importing a few hundred board feet.

BTW, the fishing was great and we claimed it as a business expense.<g>

Jonathan Kabak
03-23-2001, 06:43 PM
I think a couple of years ago Woodenboat had an article on an exotic wood importer. You may wany to check that out.

Jonathan Kabak
03-23-2001, 06:43 PM
I think a couple of years ago Woodenboat had an article on an exotic wood importer. You may wany to check that out.

Jonathan Kabak
03-23-2001, 06:43 PM
I think a couple of years ago Woodenboat had an article on an exotic wood importer. You may wany to check that out.

trull
03-23-2001, 08:49 PM
Here is a link about a low tech operation.
camden.k2bh.com/Community/Story.cfm?StoryID=1658 (http://camden.k2bh.com/Community/Story.cfm?StoryID=1658)

trull
03-23-2001, 08:49 PM
Here is a link about a low tech operation.
camden.k2bh.com/Community/Story.cfm?StoryID=1658 (http://camden.k2bh.com/Community/Story.cfm?StoryID=1658)

trull
03-23-2001, 08:49 PM
Here is a link about a low tech operation.
camden.k2bh.com/Community/Story.cfm?StoryID=1658 (http://camden.k2bh.com/Community/Story.cfm?StoryID=1658)

Bruce Hooke
03-27-2001, 05:37 PM
I have no direct experience with this but I believe I read somewhere that if you carry freight you then become a commercial vessel and as a result you have to pay higher port charges and deal with numerous other related issues...

Bruce Hooke
03-27-2001, 05:37 PM
I have no direct experience with this but I believe I read somewhere that if you carry freight you then become a commercial vessel and as a result you have to pay higher port charges and deal with numerous other related issues...

Bruce Hooke
03-27-2001, 05:37 PM
I have no direct experience with this but I believe I read somewhere that if you carry freight you then become a commercial vessel and as a result you have to pay higher port charges and deal with numerous other related issues...

paladin
03-27-2001, 06:42 PM
There's more than one way to skin a cat. If you are serious about a large quantity of sawn lumber, rough sawn, make great big crates out of it and put a couple of terra cotta things in it. The wood comes in free, freight is minimal and the import duty on the dogs might be 5 bucks. Shipped in 3600 pounds of Burmese teak this way a few years ago. It worked with Honduras Mahogany also.

paladin
03-27-2001, 06:42 PM
There's more than one way to skin a cat. If you are serious about a large quantity of sawn lumber, rough sawn, make great big crates out of it and put a couple of terra cotta things in it. The wood comes in free, freight is minimal and the import duty on the dogs might be 5 bucks. Shipped in 3600 pounds of Burmese teak this way a few years ago. It worked with Honduras Mahogany also.

paladin
03-27-2001, 06:42 PM
There's more than one way to skin a cat. If you are serious about a large quantity of sawn lumber, rough sawn, make great big crates out of it and put a couple of terra cotta things in it. The wood comes in free, freight is minimal and the import duty on the dogs might be 5 bucks. Shipped in 3600 pounds of Burmese teak this way a few years ago. It worked with Honduras Mahogany also.

Art Read
03-28-2001, 09:41 AM
LOL! What a great idea! I just snapped up a couple of Honduran made "pallets" that were laying up next to a dumpster near the the "new" boatshop... Some of the nicest "trim" mahogany I've seen in a long time...

Art Read
03-28-2001, 09:41 AM
LOL! What a great idea! I just snapped up a couple of Honduran made "pallets" that were laying up next to a dumpster near the the "new" boatshop... Some of the nicest "trim" mahogany I've seen in a long time...

Art Read
03-28-2001, 09:41 AM
LOL! What a great idea! I just snapped up a couple of Honduran made "pallets" that were laying up next to a dumpster near the the "new" boatshop... Some of the nicest "trim" mahogany I've seen in a long time...

gashmore
03-28-2001, 02:03 PM
I believe it was Henry Ford who insisted that the engine manufacturers crate their engines in boxes of a certain dimension, wood and quality. Then he would take the boxes apart and use them as floor boards in Model Ts.

gashmore
03-28-2001, 02:03 PM
I believe it was Henry Ford who insisted that the engine manufacturers crate their engines in boxes of a certain dimension, wood and quality. Then he would take the boxes apart and use them as floor boards in Model Ts.

gashmore
03-28-2001, 02:03 PM
I believe it was Henry Ford who insisted that the engine manufacturers crate their engines in boxes of a certain dimension, wood and quality. Then he would take the boxes apart and use them as floor boards in Model Ts.