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Dave Hadfield
03-10-2015, 12:28 PM
I just got back from this, if anyone is interested...

http://www.hadfield.ca/Winter%20Trip%202015/wall%20tent.jpg



http://www.myccr.com/phpbbforum/viewtopic.php?f=36&t=43686&p=401183#p401183

Dave

David G
03-10-2015, 12:30 PM
Lemmee guess... NOT the Bahamas?

Chip-skiff
03-10-2015, 12:36 PM
Interesting way of rigging the stovepipe, I'd guess to avoid cinder holes in the tent. Do you use a screen as well? What's the fabric?

The fly is ingenious, since it directs the snow sliding off the top away from the tent walls. On a plain wall tent, the snow builds up and pushes the walls inward unless you shovel it regularly.

Flying Orca
03-10-2015, 12:52 PM
Love it. I haven't done much winter camping south of the treeline but that looks like a pretty good setup!

S.V. Airlie
03-10-2015, 01:00 PM
It looks a bit woody! Why not bear claws (paws)... Wouldn't they have been easier to manage in the woods?Looks like an excellent set up.

Sky Blue
03-10-2015, 01:01 PM
I'm interested. What's the story?

switters
03-10-2015, 01:02 PM
Excellent, thanks for the share.

BrianW
03-10-2015, 01:34 PM
Follow the link in Dave's post.

Excellent!

Donn
03-10-2015, 01:53 PM
I tend to go in a different direction for winter camping, and this is my idea of proper footwear:

https://www.orthoticshop.com/images/D/moszkito_archy_brown_400.jpg

Dave Hadfield
03-10-2015, 02:07 PM
The stove-pipe is indeed routed that way to avoid spark-holes in the tent. No screen is required. The fabric for the stove-corner is heavy treated polycotton. The rest of the tent is made from 4 oz rip-stop uncoated nylon. A good compromise.

The flysheet also stops snow from sticking and building up on the roof when the stove dies down.

I do mention the snowshoe types in the thread. I take 2 types, one for breaking trail and one for camp work.

Yeah I know, it ain't for sandaled feet, but it was still fun!

Dave

Fitz
03-10-2015, 02:57 PM
Looks like a great trip, Dave. Thanks for sharing your travels.

I am also a fan of the tubular lanterns. I have a couple of antiques that I use and a couple of new Dietz.

Dietz Monarch circa 1940.

http://i1288.photobucket.com/albums/b489/fitzyknu/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpsyomzexmd.jpg (http://s1288.photobucket.com/user/fitzyknu/media/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpsyomzexmd.jpg.html)

Captain Intrepid
03-10-2015, 03:21 PM
I just got back from this, if anyone is interested...

http://www.hadfield.ca/Winter%20Trip%202015/wall%20tent.jpg



http://www.myccr.com/phpbbforum/viewtopic.php?f=36&t=43686&p=401183#p401183

Dave

Wonderful, though it must be a bear to hump all that gear into the backwoods!

S.V. Airlie
03-10-2015, 03:47 PM
Finally, went through the pics. Looks like a well thought out trip! Good pics too! Thanks for posting them!

Fitz
03-10-2015, 04:21 PM
Dave:

Where did you find your "long pointy shoes". I could've used those here the last couple of years. But with my luck, GW will snuff out winter if I actually made a purchase.

Shang
03-10-2015, 04:31 PM
We did a fun winter trip with our High Adventure Scouts a few years ago. We launched six canoes in the Niangua River in February. There was snow on the ground, but the main channel of the river was ice-free and running hard. My kid and I were doing fine until the canoe ahead of us turned broadside and we T-boned it and rolled. going into the water wasn't too bad, but coming out was memorable. Colder still when we had to strip standing on the shore, and put on dry clothes from our dry-bags.
There's a wide-mouthed, south-facing cave above the river, where we made camp. For many years the Osage Indians had used the cave for a winter camp, and we cooked our dinner in one of their fire pits. We spread our sleeping bags in the indentations where the Indians had cleared the pebbles for their own sleeping places. We fell asleep listening to the coyotes singing in the distance.

All of our Scouts are grown men now, with kids of their own. It pleases me to think that when their kids are old enough they'll take trips like that.

Bruce Taylor
03-10-2015, 04:51 PM
Great thread, Dave! The thread on CCR is like a little textbook on how to do it right. Y> Looks like a Cree hunting camp!

I haven't hung out on that forum for years. Glad to see it's still going strong.

McMike
03-10-2015, 05:00 PM
I enjoyed the thread, thanks!

bobbys
03-10-2015, 05:07 PM
We go hunting. And use a elk tent.

Sometimes it snows.

I'm going to set up the tent from now on with a tree in front to secure the stove pipe..

I liked that.

Sorta a pain to set the tent up but it's the only way to go.

Funny my son moved out of his house and set up the tent in my yard and stayed in the tent.

I'm thinking of making a plywood platform floor..

Our tent has no floor what did you put down on yours if there was ready snow?.

We put down a tarp.

Bruce Taylor
03-10-2015, 05:16 PM
I'm thinking of making a plywood platform floor..

I've been wanting to do that for years. I've got the spot, I just don't have a nice wall tent.


Our tent has no floor what did you put down on yours if there was ready snow?.

Up in James Bay, people use spruce boughs. They're springy, and keep nice and dry.

Flying Orca
03-10-2015, 06:18 PM
Up in James Bay, people use spruce boughs. They're springy, and keep nice and dry.

That's how I was taught, summer or winter below the tree line. Further north, caribou skins make anything luxurious... and it's astounding how warm an igloo can be when it's minus $bignum outside.

john welsford
03-10-2015, 07:32 PM
Dave, thanks for that. From here in New Zealand that sort of cold is unimaginable, but it does get down and damp far enough to need some heating.
Tell us about the stove, obviously somewhat portable but what kind and how effective?

John Welsford



The stove-pipe is indeed routed that way to avoid spark-holes in the tent. No screen is required. The fabric for the stove-corner is heavy treated polycotton. The rest of the tent is made from 4 oz rip-stop uncoated nylon. A good compromise.

The flysheet also stops snow from sticking and building up on the roof when the stove dies down.

I do mention the snowshoe types in the thread. I take 2 types, one for breaking trail and one for camp work.

Yeah I know, it ain't for sandaled feet, but it was still fun!

Dave

Old Dryfoot
03-10-2015, 07:38 PM
Dave:

Where did you find your "long pointy shoes". I could've used those here the last couple of years. But with my luck, GW will snuff out winter if I actually made a purchase.

I've always know those as Ojibwa snowshoes, searching under that name should turn up some places to purchase them.

Dave, thank you for the thread(s), it's been a long time since I've winter camped, too long now that I think about it.

Dave Hadfield
03-11-2015, 10:25 AM
Fitz, you can still get the pointy, Ojibwa snowshoes from Faber, https://www.fabersnowshoes.com/snowshoes/traditional I bought mine in the mid-'80s. They are somewhat repaired and reinforced by various cords woven through over the years, but the main way to preserve snowshoes is varnish varnish varnish. It needs to be done when they are dry, in the Fall. And yes, the Dietz lanterns are great -- particularly the ones with the wide (7/8") wick. We also use one on Drake as a main cabin light.

C.I. -- yes, weight control is very important on a winter trip. You need more gear, but it's harder to transport. (A canoe can be moved by a light breeze. Not so a sled.) But these various types of toboggans are quite efficient, and since you pull wearing snowshoes, there is always a packed, or at least partially packed, trail. The nice thing about a toboggan over a pack, is that when you stop you are resting (ie it's not still on your back) and that your clothes stay loose as you pull and keep ventilating. Sweaty wet clothing is a very bad thing in the winter bush.

Bobby -- we used to use a plastic tarp as a ground sheet, but it moves around too much, and makes noise all the time. I have since switch to Typar house-wrap, which is much superior. As for tent-platforms, they are fine for a long-term settlement, but do house mice. We do use spruce boughs on the floor of the working space. Much drier and tidier and warmer on the feet as you're cooking.

Dave Hadfield
03-11-2015, 10:34 AM
John, the stoves are hand-made in my home shop. I've built about a dozen. They're easy.

Most people get all wrapped-up about efficiency-ratings with these stoves. In reality that's pointless. Tents or boat-cabins are very small spaces, and any kind of fire enclosed in a metal box can over-heat them. There is a surplus of heat. And in the Bush there is limitless firewood. They don't have to be super-efficient and keep a fire all night. However, in use I find them to be quite efficient indeed.

I make them of light sheet-metal, even 26 gauge, and pop-rivet them together (using steel rivets, not aluminum, for obvious reasons). They work very well (as you can see from the photo of one glowing red hot). However it's best to make them as I have done: proportion about 9 x 9 x 22, front-loader, one stove-ring, 3" stovepipe, and pipe exiting the top back. Mess with these basic concepts and the stove won't draw.

I use one on Drake in the Fall, set up on a plate that mounts in the centerboard inspection-slot.

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y79/DaveHadfield/f0f2e44c.jpg

Dave

paulf
03-11-2015, 11:46 AM
http://i199.photobucket.com/albums/aa66/farley_p/March%202015%20006_zpsvr0df10c.jpg (http://s199.photobucket.com/user/farley_p/media/March%202015%20006_zpsvr0df10c.jpg.html)

This sunday I was training for a trip across the Olympics (retrace the press expedition, 60 mi) this July with my grand kids, daughter and son in law. This was at 4200 feet, I should have had to use snow shoes. We are at 13% of normal snow. Record low here. When they did it it was a record high and they started in November or December and it took them 6 months.

Great fun Dave!

john welsford
03-11-2015, 01:37 PM
Nice, thanks Dave. I bet there are times when that glow is a real comfort.
I've a chunk of 6inch x 9in 1/4in wall steel box girder that I'm thinking might make a good stove for my ship, but it sure is not something that you'd want to carry on a camping trip.


John Welsford



John, the stoves are hand-made in my home shop. I've built about a dozen. They're easy.

Most people get all wrapped-up about efficiency-ratings with these stoves. In reality that's pointless. Tents or boat-cabins are very small spaces, and any kind of fire enclosed in a metal box can over-heat them. There is a surplus of heat. And in the Bush there is limitless firewood. They don't have to be super-efficient and keep a fire all night. However, in use I find them to be quite efficient indeed.

I make them of light sheet-metal, even 26 gauge, and pop-rivet them together (using steel rivets, not aluminum, for obvious reasons). They work very well (as you can see from the photo of one glowing red hot). However it's best to make them as I have done: proportion about 9 x 9 x 22, front-loader, one stove-ring, 3" stovepipe, and pipe exiting the top back. Mess with these basic concepts and the stove won't draw.

I use one on Drake in the Fall, set up on a plate that mounts in the centerboard inspection-slot.

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y79/DaveHadfield/f0f2e44c.jpg

Dave

Dave Hadfield
03-12-2015, 10:55 PM
John, definitely not on my sled!

But I would think your piece would make a dandy firebox. It would certainly be simple to weld the pieces on. (A mig-welder?)

I think I'd mount it with the 9" dimension running up and down, because it would help the fire burn. Perhaps you could also weld a rail around the top, angling outwards a bit, to hold a particular pot or kettle.

The 3" stovepipe would be ample.

Dave

Gerard
03-12-2015, 11:23 PM
Hey Paulf

My brother in law and I did that trip retracing the Press expedition back in February 1993. Cold, required snowshoes for a large chunk, but fun. Done it in the summer too; it's beautiful and well worth the walk. Enjoy.

paulf
03-12-2015, 11:29 PM
Hey Paulf

My brother in law and I did that trip retracing the Press expedition back in February 1993. Cold, required snowshoes for a large chunk, but fun. Done it in the summer too; it's beautiful and well worth the walk. Enjoy.

Thanks! I was hoping for someone to say its worth it!!