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Norm Harris
03-02-2001, 02:14 PM
I've done some patching and emergency repairs, but I have never done any serious sewing. I developed a real bad case of sticker shock when I replaced my main sail cover and now I would like to build my own covers, sail bags, etc.

I came across the Sailrite web site and now I wonder if any one out there has had experience with them.

Norm Harris
03-02-2001, 02:14 PM
I've done some patching and emergency repairs, but I have never done any serious sewing. I developed a real bad case of sticker shock when I replaced my main sail cover and now I would like to build my own covers, sail bags, etc.

I came across the Sailrite web site and now I wonder if any one out there has had experience with them.

Norm Harris
03-02-2001, 02:14 PM
I've done some patching and emergency repairs, but I have never done any serious sewing. I developed a real bad case of sticker shock when I replaced my main sail cover and now I would like to build my own covers, sail bags, etc.

I came across the Sailrite web site and now I wonder if any one out there has had experience with them.

Dale Genther
03-02-2001, 04:38 PM
I buy from Sailrite all the time. The are good to deal with, and their products are good. They are also very helpful on the phone if you have any questions. One on the things I made using one of their kits was a mainsail cover. I works and looks good. Took me about 6-8 hours to make.

Dale Genther
03-02-2001, 04:38 PM
I buy from Sailrite all the time. The are good to deal with, and their products are good. They are also very helpful on the phone if you have any questions. One on the things I made using one of their kits was a mainsail cover. I works and looks good. Took me about 6-8 hours to make.

Dale Genther
03-02-2001, 04:38 PM
I buy from Sailrite all the time. The are good to deal with, and their products are good. They are also very helpful on the phone if you have any questions. One on the things I made using one of their kits was a mainsail cover. I works and looks good. Took me about 6-8 hours to make.

Adam Finch
03-02-2001, 07:51 PM
You should also check out Sailmaker's Supply: www.sailmakerssupply.com. (http://www.sailmakerssupply.com.) They are very helpful and their prices are good too!

Adam Finch
03-02-2001, 07:51 PM
You should also check out Sailmaker's Supply: www.sailmakerssupply.com. (http://www.sailmakerssupply.com.) They are very helpful and their prices are good too!

Adam Finch
03-02-2001, 07:51 PM
You should also check out Sailmaker's Supply: www.sailmakerssupply.com. (http://www.sailmakerssupply.com.) They are very helpful and their prices are good too!

NormMessinger
03-02-2001, 08:20 PM
Sailrite is good. Can't compare with anyone else but I've made several sails and sail bags from their kits. Instructions and layout of the sails is excellent and their telephone support is invaluable.

--Norm

NormMessinger
03-02-2001, 08:20 PM
Sailrite is good. Can't compare with anyone else but I've made several sails and sail bags from their kits. Instructions and layout of the sails is excellent and their telephone support is invaluable.

--Norm

NormMessinger
03-02-2001, 08:20 PM
Sailrite is good. Can't compare with anyone else but I've made several sails and sail bags from their kits. Instructions and layout of the sails is excellent and their telephone support is invaluable.

--Norm

Steve Lansdowne
03-02-2001, 09:35 PM
Ditto.

Steve Lansdowne
03-02-2001, 09:35 PM
Ditto.

Steve Lansdowne
03-02-2001, 09:35 PM
Ditto.

Bernadette & David Hedger
03-06-2001, 04:01 AM
Norm,
About 3 years ago we imported a Sailrite sewing machine into Australia. We ordered via email after talking with them on the phone. The machine arrived in perfect condition and sews perfectly. Bernadette has sewn so much for our last yacht (sail covers, awnings and lee cloths for example) saving us so much money. We import all the spares and accessories without any problem what-so-ever. From memory they also have a online help service.
If you buy from them you won't be dissapointed.

Bernadette & David Hedger
03-06-2001, 04:01 AM
Norm,
About 3 years ago we imported a Sailrite sewing machine into Australia. We ordered via email after talking with them on the phone. The machine arrived in perfect condition and sews perfectly. Bernadette has sewn so much for our last yacht (sail covers, awnings and lee cloths for example) saving us so much money. We import all the spares and accessories without any problem what-so-ever. From memory they also have a online help service.
If you buy from them you won't be dissapointed.

Bernadette & David Hedger
03-06-2001, 04:01 AM
Norm,
About 3 years ago we imported a Sailrite sewing machine into Australia. We ordered via email after talking with them on the phone. The machine arrived in perfect condition and sews perfectly. Bernadette has sewn so much for our last yacht (sail covers, awnings and lee cloths for example) saving us so much money. We import all the spares and accessories without any problem what-so-ever. From memory they also have a online help service.
If you buy from them you won't be dissapointed.

NormMessinger
03-06-2001, 09:53 AM
It occurs to me that you did good to get a Sailrite machine. If I had done that at the very beginning I would have sewn much better seams, probably nice streight ones at that, more than paid off the machine and had fun making sails. I bought an off brand household machine to get zigzag ability and paid for it with one 55 sq.ft. sail but it was impossible to sew streight. I fear the head sails for Prairie Islander are 20' sails.

--Norm

NormMessinger
03-06-2001, 09:53 AM
It occurs to me that you did good to get a Sailrite machine. If I had done that at the very beginning I would have sewn much better seams, probably nice streight ones at that, more than paid off the machine and had fun making sails. I bought an off brand household machine to get zigzag ability and paid for it with one 55 sq.ft. sail but it was impossible to sew streight. I fear the head sails for Prairie Islander are 20' sails.

--Norm

NormMessinger
03-06-2001, 09:53 AM
It occurs to me that you did good to get a Sailrite machine. If I had done that at the very beginning I would have sewn much better seams, probably nice streight ones at that, more than paid off the machine and had fun making sails. I bought an off brand household machine to get zigzag ability and paid for it with one 55 sq.ft. sail but it was impossible to sew streight. I fear the head sails for Prairie Islander are 20' sails.

--Norm

Ian McColgin
03-06-2001, 11:42 AM
In another thread on sewing machins Todd Bradshaw chimes in with highest praise for Sailrite. He's a pro.

Ian McColgin
03-06-2001, 11:42 AM
In another thread on sewing machins Todd Bradshaw chimes in with highest praise for Sailrite. He's a pro.

Ian McColgin
03-06-2001, 11:42 AM
In another thread on sewing machins Todd Bradshaw chimes in with highest praise for Sailrite. He's a pro.

DD
03-07-2001, 12:26 PM
As an ex-sailmaker, I bought a Sailrite machine several years ago to go cruising-seemed far simpler than converting an old loft machine. I have been very happy with my machine -hand crank, 12v, 110v or 220 -it is very versatile and can get through some fairly heavy stuff. The people at Sailrite are very helpful as well-they may not be the cheapest but offer good value and they know their stuff

DD
03-07-2001, 12:26 PM
As an ex-sailmaker, I bought a Sailrite machine several years ago to go cruising-seemed far simpler than converting an old loft machine. I have been very happy with my machine -hand crank, 12v, 110v or 220 -it is very versatile and can get through some fairly heavy stuff. The people at Sailrite are very helpful as well-they may not be the cheapest but offer good value and they know their stuff

DD
03-07-2001, 12:26 PM
As an ex-sailmaker, I bought a Sailrite machine several years ago to go cruising-seemed far simpler than converting an old loft machine. I have been very happy with my machine -hand crank, 12v, 110v or 220 -it is very versatile and can get through some fairly heavy stuff. The people at Sailrite are very helpful as well-they may not be the cheapest but offer good value and they know their stuff

BillP
03-10-2001, 11:08 AM
Sailrite has been around at least 25 years that I can remember. They were reputable back then. Their sewing machines used to be converted heavy duty home type (Brother). Satisfactory for the home projects but not up to commercial endurance (I used to own a marine canvas shop).

Technique is important in handling dac and nylon...very slippery stuff, so read up on sewing these materials before starting off. A walking foot machine takes a lot of the pain out when sewing heavy material too...as does double back tape.

Bill P.

BillP
03-10-2001, 11:08 AM
Sailrite has been around at least 25 years that I can remember. They were reputable back then. Their sewing machines used to be converted heavy duty home type (Brother). Satisfactory for the home projects but not up to commercial endurance (I used to own a marine canvas shop).

Technique is important in handling dac and nylon...very slippery stuff, so read up on sewing these materials before starting off. A walking foot machine takes a lot of the pain out when sewing heavy material too...as does double back tape.

Bill P.

BillP
03-10-2001, 11:08 AM
Sailrite has been around at least 25 years that I can remember. They were reputable back then. Their sewing machines used to be converted heavy duty home type (Brother). Satisfactory for the home projects but not up to commercial endurance (I used to own a marine canvas shop).

Technique is important in handling dac and nylon...very slippery stuff, so read up on sewing these materials before starting off. A walking foot machine takes a lot of the pain out when sewing heavy material too...as does double back tape.

Bill P.

Todd Bradshaw
03-10-2001, 07:16 PM
I've been making a living with my Sailrite Sailmaker machine for over 20 years, first working on hot-air balloons and for the last 15 building sails and covers. They're actually converted industrial tailor's machines (Brother TZ1-B652's). I once burned-out a motor and they replaced it for free, I've replaced the foot pedal once, to the tune of about $12 and over the years replaced about $40 worth of springs and parts.

It doesn't sew at the speed of big, industrial machines, but it seems to be pretty durable to me. To tune it up, I test-sew through magazines. Don't believe for a minute that it isn't one tough little bugger and built to last.

T.E.B.

[This message has been edited by Todd Bradshaw (edited 03-10-2001).]

Todd Bradshaw
03-10-2001, 07:16 PM
I've been making a living with my Sailrite Sailmaker machine for over 20 years, first working on hot-air balloons and for the last 15 building sails and covers. They're actually converted industrial tailor's machines (Brother TZ1-B652's). I once burned-out a motor and they replaced it for free, I've replaced the foot pedal once, to the tune of about $12 and over the years replaced about $40 worth of springs and parts.

It doesn't sew at the speed of big, industrial machines, but it seems to be pretty durable to me. To tune it up, I test-sew through magazines. Don't believe for a minute that it isn't one tough little bugger and built to last.

T.E.B.

[This message has been edited by Todd Bradshaw (edited 03-10-2001).]

Todd Bradshaw
03-10-2001, 07:16 PM
I've been making a living with my Sailrite Sailmaker machine for over 20 years, first working on hot-air balloons and for the last 15 building sails and covers. They're actually converted industrial tailor's machines (Brother TZ1-B652's). I once burned-out a motor and they replaced it for free, I've replaced the foot pedal once, to the tune of about $12 and over the years replaced about $40 worth of springs and parts.

It doesn't sew at the speed of big, industrial machines, but it seems to be pretty durable to me. To tune it up, I test-sew through magazines. Don't believe for a minute that it isn't one tough little bugger and built to last.

T.E.B.

[This message has been edited by Todd Bradshaw (edited 03-10-2001).]

BillP
03-11-2001, 10:38 AM
Todd,
In the early 70s I checked out their machines and for the same price bought heavy duty commercial Pfaff/Singer machines with walking feet. These were not portable but sewed circles around the lightweight Sailrite. They were just in another league. It's not that the Sailright was bad, but stitching at 5-7000 per minute vs 2000 made a big production difference. As did the walking foot, length of stitch, 1/3hp motor, stand, ability to use heavier thread (138)etc.. Still, if I was to take off cruising again I would likely have a sailrite aboard to help support the cruise kitty.

Bill P.

BillP
03-11-2001, 10:38 AM
Todd,
In the early 70s I checked out their machines and for the same price bought heavy duty commercial Pfaff/Singer machines with walking feet. These were not portable but sewed circles around the lightweight Sailrite. They were just in another league. It's not that the Sailright was bad, but stitching at 5-7000 per minute vs 2000 made a big production difference. As did the walking foot, length of stitch, 1/3hp motor, stand, ability to use heavier thread (138)etc.. Still, if I was to take off cruising again I would likely have a sailrite aboard to help support the cruise kitty.

Bill P.

BillP
03-11-2001, 10:38 AM
Todd,
In the early 70s I checked out their machines and for the same price bought heavy duty commercial Pfaff/Singer machines with walking feet. These were not portable but sewed circles around the lightweight Sailrite. They were just in another league. It's not that the Sailright was bad, but stitching at 5-7000 per minute vs 2000 made a big production difference. As did the walking foot, length of stitch, 1/3hp motor, stand, ability to use heavier thread (138)etc.. Still, if I was to take off cruising again I would likely have a sailrite aboard to help support the cruise kitty.

Bill P.