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Joe2001
11-02-2000, 10:00 PM
I will be starting a project in the spring, a traditional chicken-breasted aux/sailing NJ Garvey (Barnegat Bay & Close Offshore)local clear planking is not a problem, the dead-wood and keel are. I need a 4" x 12" x 22' piece, an old beam will do. I will go a reasonable distance to get it. Cost is also a problem. (I'm not cheap, just poor!) any ideas or sources and advise would be welcome.
Tanks - joe
***Added*** 00.1105:1703: Want to use cedar because it is the usual primary material used in these boats,Live Oak has occasionally been used, however, they are predominately cedar.

[This message has been edited by Joe2001 (edited 11-05-2000).]

Joe2001
11-02-2000, 10:00 PM
I will be starting a project in the spring, a traditional chicken-breasted aux/sailing NJ Garvey (Barnegat Bay & Close Offshore)local clear planking is not a problem, the dead-wood and keel are. I need a 4" x 12" x 22' piece, an old beam will do. I will go a reasonable distance to get it. Cost is also a problem. (I'm not cheap, just poor!) any ideas or sources and advise would be welcome.
Tanks - joe
***Added*** 00.1105:1703: Want to use cedar because it is the usual primary material used in these boats,Live Oak has occasionally been used, however, they are predominately cedar.

[This message has been edited by Joe2001 (edited 11-05-2000).]

Joe2001
11-02-2000, 10:00 PM
I will be starting a project in the spring, a traditional chicken-breasted aux/sailing NJ Garvey (Barnegat Bay & Close Offshore)local clear planking is not a problem, the dead-wood and keel are. I need a 4" x 12" x 22' piece, an old beam will do. I will go a reasonable distance to get it. Cost is also a problem. (I'm not cheap, just poor!) any ideas or sources and advise would be welcome.
Tanks - joe
***Added*** 00.1105:1703: Want to use cedar because it is the usual primary material used in these boats,Live Oak has occasionally been used, however, they are predominately cedar.

[This message has been edited by Joe2001 (edited 11-05-2000).]

Tom Dugan
11-03-2000, 09:07 AM
Cedar? Keels are more usually made of denser stuff, for better grip on fasteners, for stiffness, and for abrasion resistance. White oak is usually specified.

In any case, I can't point you to a particular source, but I'd take the long view and find a sawmill who can get hold of the right tree and mill it, then let it dry for a couple of years. Hopefully someone else has a source for ready-to-use stuff.

-T

Tom Dugan
11-03-2000, 09:07 AM
Cedar? Keels are more usually made of denser stuff, for better grip on fasteners, for stiffness, and for abrasion resistance. White oak is usually specified.

In any case, I can't point you to a particular source, but I'd take the long view and find a sawmill who can get hold of the right tree and mill it, then let it dry for a couple of years. Hopefully someone else has a source for ready-to-use stuff.

-T

Tom Dugan
11-03-2000, 09:07 AM
Cedar? Keels are more usually made of denser stuff, for better grip on fasteners, for stiffness, and for abrasion resistance. White oak is usually specified.

In any case, I can't point you to a particular source, but I'd take the long view and find a sawmill who can get hold of the right tree and mill it, then let it dry for a couple of years. Hopefully someone else has a source for ready-to-use stuff.

-T

holzbt
11-04-2000, 11:17 AM
Go to the mill that can supply you with long planking stock and ask them if they can get some oak for you. Chances are that they regularly cut oak. If they can't get a 22' piece then just get two shorter ones and scarf them together. If you don't want to use oak try a commercial lumber yard and have them order either yellow pine or fir. The only problem with ordering is that you generally have to take whatever they get in. There is a yard in Brooklyn, NY that supplies the heavy construction trade and they often have timbers up to 30' long. Another option is M. Fine lumber in Brooklyn. They sell salvage timbers and may have a piece of old yellow pine.
As for the reply that said to dry your keel for several years, don't bother. I am assuming that this boat will live in the water. If so , you don't want the keel really dry especially if it is oak. If you use a salvage timber it will be dry, if you use oak from the mill it will be dry enough by the time you finish the boat.

holzbt
11-04-2000, 11:17 AM
Go to the mill that can supply you with long planking stock and ask them if they can get some oak for you. Chances are that they regularly cut oak. If they can't get a 22' piece then just get two shorter ones and scarf them together. If you don't want to use oak try a commercial lumber yard and have them order either yellow pine or fir. The only problem with ordering is that you generally have to take whatever they get in. There is a yard in Brooklyn, NY that supplies the heavy construction trade and they often have timbers up to 30' long. Another option is M. Fine lumber in Brooklyn. They sell salvage timbers and may have a piece of old yellow pine.
As for the reply that said to dry your keel for several years, don't bother. I am assuming that this boat will live in the water. If so , you don't want the keel really dry especially if it is oak. If you use a salvage timber it will be dry, if you use oak from the mill it will be dry enough by the time you finish the boat.

holzbt
11-04-2000, 11:17 AM
Go to the mill that can supply you with long planking stock and ask them if they can get some oak for you. Chances are that they regularly cut oak. If they can't get a 22' piece then just get two shorter ones and scarf them together. If you don't want to use oak try a commercial lumber yard and have them order either yellow pine or fir. The only problem with ordering is that you generally have to take whatever they get in. There is a yard in Brooklyn, NY that supplies the heavy construction trade and they often have timbers up to 30' long. Another option is M. Fine lumber in Brooklyn. They sell salvage timbers and may have a piece of old yellow pine.
As for the reply that said to dry your keel for several years, don't bother. I am assuming that this boat will live in the water. If so , you don't want the keel really dry especially if it is oak. If you use a salvage timber it will be dry, if you use oak from the mill it will be dry enough by the time you finish the boat.

nedL
11-08-2000, 11:41 AM
I would like to know your source for Jersey white cedar. I grew up on the shore, and have a couple of "project boats"that were built there more than half a century ago that I hope to be getting to in the future. The problem is that the boats and I am now in N.E connecticut, and I have lost my sources for 'proper'cedar for planking.-Thanks,Ned

nedL
11-08-2000, 11:41 AM
I would like to know your source for Jersey white cedar. I grew up on the shore, and have a couple of "project boats"that were built there more than half a century ago that I hope to be getting to in the future. The problem is that the boats and I am now in N.E connecticut, and I have lost my sources for 'proper'cedar for planking.-Thanks,Ned

nedL
11-08-2000, 11:41 AM
I would like to know your source for Jersey white cedar. I grew up on the shore, and have a couple of "project boats"that were built there more than half a century ago that I hope to be getting to in the future. The problem is that the boats and I am now in N.E connecticut, and I have lost my sources for 'proper'cedar for planking.-Thanks,Ned