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Paul Pless
02-23-2015, 05:12 PM
I listened to a public radio program this afternoon on policing. The transcript will be available tomorrow and if there is interest I will link it then. It was reviewing a statistical study of several hundred non state and non federal law enforcement agencies across the United States. Some things that stood out:



less than 1% of all law enforcement agencies require a college degree
only 45% of all new cops have a college degree
1/2 of all cops that have graduated from college have earned degrees in criminal justice
police officers with college educations are approximately 55% less likely to use illegal force than non college educated cops
police officers with college degrees are twice as likely to be dissatisfied with both their superiors and their union than cops without college degrees


The study's author, a former cop and now professor of criminal justice suggested that cops with college educations tend to view their jobs more akin to being hands on social workers and they engage in what they refer to as policing, whereas very generally, non college educated cops view their career as law enforcement - there's a subtle* difference.

Another observation regarding how law enforcement agencies work that I found interesting is that rookie cops get the worst, most dangerous assignments: meaning the most dangerous jurisdictions, the late night shifts, and weekends and holidays. Veteran cops, as they advance, get to move away from the most dangerous and the most conflict oriented shifts and patrols.





* nuanced if you like. . .

S.V. Airlie
02-23-2015, 05:24 PM
I think those %'s are about right.

ex. one reason, a lot of MP's who entered the military after high school probably joined some police dept.
I've would have thought more were college grads than shown. I'd be interested in the ages of the cops; many non-degreed men are perhaps older? Younger, perhaps with college degree?s

Sheriffs are elected here not hired. Another point..May not have a college degree. Here I don't think it is required.

Ian McColgin
02-23-2015, 05:36 PM
There's interest in the transcript.

CWSmith
02-23-2015, 05:36 PM
You do remember the city in Mass that refused to hire candidates who scored too high on the IQ test?

hokiefan
02-23-2015, 06:08 PM
I listened to a public radio program this afternoon on policing. The transcript will be available tomorrow and if there is interest I will link it then. It was reviewing a statistical study of several hundred non state and non federal law enforcement agencies across the United States. Some things that stood out:

...

Another observation regarding how law enforcement agencies work that I found interesting is that rookie cops get the worst, most dangerous assignments: meaning the most dangerous jurisdictions, the late night shifts, and weekends and holidays. Veteran cops, as they advance, get to move away from the most dangerous and the most conflict oriented shifts and patrols.

...


This same phenomenon happens in education. The new teachers get assigned to the troubled schools and the most difficult classrooms in those schools, while the experienced teachers get more trouble-free schools and good classes. You would think good management would put the experienced teachers in the more difficult situations, but I understand why the experienced teachers feel like they've earned the right to deal with less of that crap.

Cheers,

Bobby

S.V. Airlie
02-23-2015, 06:13 PM
Yup, in both professions! The pecking order is alive and well!

Michael D. Storey
02-24-2015, 09:20 PM
You know what TeachAmerica is? It is a trainwreck of a lookhowfineapersonIamtohelpthesepoorunfortunates idea that puts untrained recent graduates into poor classrooms. It does no more than demonstrate that we do not care at all about public education, especially than what is provided for the poor. What is the sense of putting the worse teachers into the worse classes?

Jim Bow
02-24-2015, 09:33 PM
Historical note: in 1970, I considered the Washington State Patrol. They had a, now forbidden, height requirement. You had to be 6 feet tall, unless you had a bachelor's degree. In that case you could be 5'11".

S.V. Airlie
02-24-2015, 10:06 PM
That damn mortarboard.

David G
02-24-2015, 10:12 PM
There's interest in the transcript.

Certainly...

Dave Gray
02-24-2015, 10:18 PM
I am not sure their education level is relevant. What I think is more interesting is the number of times they fired their weapon in the course of carrying out a police action and those most prone do so. From what I have read, for all the data collected and collated by police departments this is not one that you can easily get statistics on.