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cs
01-05-2004, 08:22 AM
Back in the fall I had to purchase a new circular saw. After asking for advice here I ended up getting the Porter-Cable 743K 7-1/4" with the blade on the left hand side of the motor.

http://store4.yimg.com/I/tylertool_1773_1028724

It has a 15 amp motor and weighs in at just a little over 10 lbs.

I finally got a chance to really use it this weekend and I tell you what I was really impressed. The saw feels lighter than 10 lbs and handles like a dream. The 15 amp motor provides plenty of power, Tim Allen style, while cutting pressure treated lumber.

The left mounted blade, despite what others told me, does take some getting used to. Raising the blade guard with your thumb is a little awkard and cutting on the near side of the line is a little more difficult. But these issues may go away with a little more practise. Besides being able to see your line clearly when cutting on the far side of the line is great.

Overall I give it two thumbs up.

Chad

cs
01-05-2004, 08:22 AM
Back in the fall I had to purchase a new circular saw. After asking for advice here I ended up getting the Porter-Cable 743K 7-1/4" with the blade on the left hand side of the motor.

http://store4.yimg.com/I/tylertool_1773_1028724

It has a 15 amp motor and weighs in at just a little over 10 lbs.

I finally got a chance to really use it this weekend and I tell you what I was really impressed. The saw feels lighter than 10 lbs and handles like a dream. The 15 amp motor provides plenty of power, Tim Allen style, while cutting pressure treated lumber.

The left mounted blade, despite what others told me, does take some getting used to. Raising the blade guard with your thumb is a little awkard and cutting on the near side of the line is a little more difficult. But these issues may go away with a little more practise. Besides being able to see your line clearly when cutting on the far side of the line is great.

Overall I give it two thumbs up.

Chad

cs
01-05-2004, 08:22 AM
Back in the fall I had to purchase a new circular saw. After asking for advice here I ended up getting the Porter-Cable 743K 7-1/4" with the blade on the left hand side of the motor.

http://store4.yimg.com/I/tylertool_1773_1028724

It has a 15 amp motor and weighs in at just a little over 10 lbs.

I finally got a chance to really use it this weekend and I tell you what I was really impressed. The saw feels lighter than 10 lbs and handles like a dream. The 15 amp motor provides plenty of power, Tim Allen style, while cutting pressure treated lumber.

The left mounted blade, despite what others told me, does take some getting used to. Raising the blade guard with your thumb is a little awkard and cutting on the near side of the line is a little more difficult. But these issues may go away with a little more practise. Besides being able to see your line clearly when cutting on the far side of the line is great.

Overall I give it two thumbs up.

Chad

CaseyJones
01-05-2004, 10:54 AM
I have never seen a left-handed saw. I sure get tired of being on the wrong side of the blade. May have to go pick up one of those.

CaseyJones
01-05-2004, 10:54 AM
I have never seen a left-handed saw. I sure get tired of being on the wrong side of the blade. May have to go pick up one of those.

CaseyJones
01-05-2004, 10:54 AM
I have never seen a left-handed saw. I sure get tired of being on the wrong side of the blade. May have to go pick up one of those.

cs
01-05-2004, 01:23 PM
Cassey this is not necessarly a left-handed saw, its just that the blade is on the left side of the motor as opposed to being on the right side.

Chad

cs
01-05-2004, 01:23 PM
Cassey this is not necessarly a left-handed saw, its just that the blade is on the left side of the motor as opposed to being on the right side.

Chad

cs
01-05-2004, 01:23 PM
Cassey this is not necessarly a left-handed saw, its just that the blade is on the left side of the motor as opposed to being on the right side.

Chad

Venchka
01-05-2004, 03:09 PM
As one of the terminally left-handed folks in the world, I bought one too. The blade left P-C. Love it!

Venchka
01-05-2004, 03:09 PM
As one of the terminally left-handed folks in the world, I bought one too. The blade left P-C. Love it!

Venchka
01-05-2004, 03:09 PM
As one of the terminally left-handed folks in the world, I bought one too. The blade left P-C. Love it!

warthog5
01-05-2004, 05:36 PM
I have the PC 345 sawboss. It's a 6in model.
It is a dream to use in cutting panels like your fixing to do Casey.
It even interchanges with the bag off of my PC beltsander.
The blades are a little expensive. $10 to $20ea.

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B00002269C.01.MZZZZZZZ.gif

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B00002269C/qid=1073341341/br=1-9/ref=br_lf_hi_9//002-9180432-4504008?v=gla nce&s=hi&n=228434

warthog5
01-05-2004, 05:36 PM
I have the PC 345 sawboss. It's a 6in model.
It is a dream to use in cutting panels like your fixing to do Casey.
It even interchanges with the bag off of my PC beltsander.
The blades are a little expensive. $10 to $20ea.

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B00002269C.01.MZZZZZZZ.gif

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B00002269C/qid=1073341341/br=1-9/ref=br_lf_hi_9//002-9180432-4504008?v=gla nce&s=hi&n=228434

warthog5
01-05-2004, 05:36 PM
I have the PC 345 sawboss. It's a 6in model.
It is a dream to use in cutting panels like your fixing to do Casey.
It even interchanges with the bag off of my PC beltsander.
The blades are a little expensive. $10 to $20ea.

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B00002269C.01.MZZZZZZZ.gif

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B00002269C/qid=1073341341/br=1-9/ref=br_lf_hi_9//002-9180432-4504008?v=gla nce&s=hi&n=228434

Jim H
01-05-2004, 07:36 PM
Casey, the PC 7 1/4 saw literally pulls itself through wood. As a righthanded person I find it helpful NOT to have to lean over the top of the saw to follow a line, but you do quickly learn to wear safety glasses.

Jim H
01-05-2004, 07:36 PM
Casey, the PC 7 1/4 saw literally pulls itself through wood. As a righthanded person I find it helpful NOT to have to lean over the top of the saw to follow a line, but you do quickly learn to wear safety glasses.

Jim H
01-05-2004, 07:36 PM
Casey, the PC 7 1/4 saw literally pulls itself through wood. As a righthanded person I find it helpful NOT to have to lean over the top of the saw to follow a line, but you do quickly learn to wear safety glasses.

Northernguy59
01-05-2004, 09:29 PM
Im a professional carpenter and believe the Skil 77c Worm Drive saw is second to none. Its a bit heavy but you get use to it. The blade is on the left like the saw above. Maybe someone can post a pic of this saw??

[ 01-05-2004, 09:31 PM: Message edited by: Northernguy59 ]

Northernguy59
01-05-2004, 09:29 PM
Im a professional carpenter and believe the Skil 77c Worm Drive saw is second to none. Its a bit heavy but you get use to it. The blade is on the left like the saw above. Maybe someone can post a pic of this saw??

[ 01-05-2004, 09:31 PM: Message edited by: Northernguy59 ]

Northernguy59
01-05-2004, 09:29 PM
Im a professional carpenter and believe the Skil 77c Worm Drive saw is second to none. Its a bit heavy but you get use to it. The blade is on the left like the saw above. Maybe someone can post a pic of this saw??

[ 01-05-2004, 09:31 PM: Message edited by: Northernguy59 ]

capt jake
01-05-2004, 09:40 PM
No offense Northernguy, I love the worm drive in a construction application but I have to go with Warthog on this! If you are hacking at framing material all day long, well the worm has it's place! smile.gif

I bought on of these 6" saws a while back after having used it for exterior trim work on a very ornate house. This thing really is acurate and is light to boot! smile.gif I ended up buying one and use it all of the time! Don't let the size confuse you, it will cut 2X material with ease.

CS, I think you did well, I contemplated the 7 1/4" as you have but decided on the smaller one, as I do a lot of trim work.

Great saw!

capt jake
01-05-2004, 09:40 PM
No offense Northernguy, I love the worm drive in a construction application but I have to go with Warthog on this! If you are hacking at framing material all day long, well the worm has it's place! smile.gif

I bought on of these 6" saws a while back after having used it for exterior trim work on a very ornate house. This thing really is acurate and is light to boot! smile.gif I ended up buying one and use it all of the time! Don't let the size confuse you, it will cut 2X material with ease.

CS, I think you did well, I contemplated the 7 1/4" as you have but decided on the smaller one, as I do a lot of trim work.

Great saw!

capt jake
01-05-2004, 09:40 PM
No offense Northernguy, I love the worm drive in a construction application but I have to go with Warthog on this! If you are hacking at framing material all day long, well the worm has it's place! smile.gif

I bought on of these 6" saws a while back after having used it for exterior trim work on a very ornate house. This thing really is acurate and is light to boot! smile.gif I ended up buying one and use it all of the time! Don't let the size confuse you, it will cut 2X material with ease.

CS, I think you did well, I contemplated the 7 1/4" as you have but decided on the smaller one, as I do a lot of trim work.

Great saw!

capt jake
01-05-2004, 10:02 PM
An additional thought, I thing the saw you bought has the Titanium shoe? Correct? These are a great thing, as they won't distort or bend if dropped. Not that we ever do that mind you! ;)

Great saw!

capt jake
01-05-2004, 10:02 PM
An additional thought, I thing the saw you bought has the Titanium shoe? Correct? These are a great thing, as they won't distort or bend if dropped. Not that we ever do that mind you! ;)

Great saw!

capt jake
01-05-2004, 10:02 PM
An additional thought, I thing the saw you bought has the Titanium shoe? Correct? These are a great thing, as they won't distort or bend if dropped. Not that we ever do that mind you! ;)

Great saw!

JimConlin
01-06-2004, 01:22 AM
My current saw was new during the LBJ administration and it may be time for a change.
I noted that the fancy scarphing jig in the last WB was based on an 8-1/4" DeWalt saw. To me, the jig looked quite workable, but it really depended on the 8-1/4" size. The Dewalt saw is over 12 lbs. and more than I want to swing. Are there other 8" saws which are less unwieldy?

JimConlin
01-06-2004, 01:22 AM
My current saw was new during the LBJ administration and it may be time for a change.
I noted that the fancy scarphing jig in the last WB was based on an 8-1/4" DeWalt saw. To me, the jig looked quite workable, but it really depended on the 8-1/4" size. The Dewalt saw is over 12 lbs. and more than I want to swing. Are there other 8" saws which are less unwieldy?

JimConlin
01-06-2004, 01:22 AM
My current saw was new during the LBJ administration and it may be time for a change.
I noted that the fancy scarphing jig in the last WB was based on an 8-1/4" DeWalt saw. To me, the jig looked quite workable, but it really depended on the 8-1/4" size. The Dewalt saw is over 12 lbs. and more than I want to swing. Are there other 8" saws which are less unwieldy?

cs
01-06-2004, 07:42 AM
Jim I don't know about 8" saws but the PC handles like a dream. She is light enough to make veritical one handed cuts without feeling like your out of control.

If I was a frameing carpenter I would have a worm drive saw, but for what I do the direct drive is a better fit.

Chad

cs
01-06-2004, 07:42 AM
Jim I don't know about 8" saws but the PC handles like a dream. She is light enough to make veritical one handed cuts without feeling like your out of control.

If I was a frameing carpenter I would have a worm drive saw, but for what I do the direct drive is a better fit.

Chad

cs
01-06-2004, 07:42 AM
Jim I don't know about 8" saws but the PC handles like a dream. She is light enough to make veritical one handed cuts without feeling like your out of control.

If I was a frameing carpenter I would have a worm drive saw, but for what I do the direct drive is a better fit.

Chad

RodB
01-11-2004, 02:52 AM
I have the Skil Wormdrive saw and the Makita Hyphoid saw (Makita's version of a worm drive). The Makita is quite a bit lighter but with the left blade offers ease of cutting and great visibility. I tend to use the Makita most of the time. These saws were recommended to me by a boatbuilder as the motor and gears turning on two planes results in a gyro-scopic action that makes the saw very easy to control, much more easy than standard circular saws when following a line is critical. Standard circular saws with a carbide blade can "walk" on their own and do not have the "gyro" effect of the worm drives... I have followed this advice and found when accuracy is critical especially on plywood I use the Makita and I love it. I also have a Milwaukee standard circular saw and use it for shorter cuts on standard lumbar.

RB

[ 01-12-2004, 02:47 AM: Message edited by: RodB ]

RodB
01-11-2004, 02:52 AM
I have the Skil Wormdrive saw and the Makita Hyphoid saw (Makita's version of a worm drive). The Makita is quite a bit lighter but with the left blade offers ease of cutting and great visibility. I tend to use the Makita most of the time. These saws were recommended to me by a boatbuilder as the motor and gears turning on two planes results in a gyro-scopic action that makes the saw very easy to control, much more easy than standard circular saws when following a line is critical. Standard circular saws with a carbide blade can "walk" on their own and do not have the "gyro" effect of the worm drives... I have followed this advice and found when accuracy is critical especially on plywood I use the Makita and I love it. I also have a Milwaukee standard circular saw and use it for shorter cuts on standard lumbar.

RB

[ 01-12-2004, 02:47 AM: Message edited by: RodB ]

RodB
01-11-2004, 02:52 AM
I have the Skil Wormdrive saw and the Makita Hyphoid saw (Makita's version of a worm drive). The Makita is quite a bit lighter but with the left blade offers ease of cutting and great visibility. I tend to use the Makita most of the time. These saws were recommended to me by a boatbuilder as the motor and gears turning on two planes results in a gyro-scopic action that makes the saw very easy to control, much more easy than standard circular saws when following a line is critical. Standard circular saws with a carbide blade can "walk" on their own and do not have the "gyro" effect of the worm drives... I have followed this advice and found when accuracy is critical especially on plywood I use the Makita and I love it. I also have a Milwaukee standard circular saw and use it for shorter cuts on standard lumbar.

RB

[ 01-12-2004, 02:47 AM: Message edited by: RodB ]