PDA

View Full Version : explosive hydroforming



Paul Pless
02-22-2015, 07:22 AM
this aluminum yacht was built using that technique
wouldn't you like to know more. . .



http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd48/Waione_photos/misc%20boats%20and%20sailing%2011/2011-11-02135814_2.jpg (http://s227.photobucket.com/user/Waione_photos/media/misc%20boats%20and%20sailing%2011/2011-11-02135814_2.jpg.html)

http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd48/Waione_photos/misc%20boats%20and%20sailing%2011/2011-11-02135845_3.jpg (http://s227.photobucket.com/user/Waione_photos/media/misc%20boats%20and%20sailing%2011/2011-11-02135845_3.jpg.html)
http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd48/Waione_photos/misc%20boats%20and%20sailing%2011/2011-11-02135759_1.jpg (http://s227.photobucket.com/user/Waione_photos/media/misc%20boats%20and%20sailing%2011/2011-11-02135759_1.jpg.html)

PeterSibley
02-22-2015, 07:28 AM
The reinforced concrete mould would be a costly structure .

willmarsh3
02-22-2015, 11:43 AM
But built in an instant.

Gerarddm
02-22-2015, 11:46 AM
That hull underbody sort of looks like a 12 Meter to me.

I recall reading about explosive hydroforming decades ago, thought it was fascinating, did not know anybody was doing it anymore.

Clarkey
02-22-2015, 11:49 AM
There was small aluminium dinghy marketed in the UK a few years ago which was made using explosive forming. I think they were called 'Zephyrs'.

Ian McColgin
02-22-2015, 11:55 AM
And a lot of autos.

The Bigfella
02-22-2015, 12:05 PM
I think I did some of that when I rode a running motorcycle through a slightly too deep creek

Dan McCosh
02-22-2015, 01:49 PM
And a lot of autos. Hydroforming is a relatively common method used in auto manufacturing. I've never heard of explosive hydroforming being used.

CWSmith
02-22-2015, 01:53 PM
That boat has some awfully nice lines!

Breakaway
02-22-2015, 01:56 PM
Interesting. ANd that boat looks fair, at least as can be seen in primer in a picture. Anyone have a link to recommend to learn more about this process?

Kevin

Dan McCosh
02-22-2015, 02:06 PM
There was a short-lived effort at the end of WWII to make pleasure boat hulls from stamped steel sections, which would have cut the cost dramatically in some volume. Can't quite envision making this one in a single strike, however.

Dan McCosh
02-22-2015, 02:10 PM
There's a summary of the process here:http://www.engineershandbook.com/MfgMethods/exforming.htm

Breakaway
02-22-2015, 02:29 PM
^Thank you, sir.

According to the link, the largest part typically made using the process is 20-feet long. Who made the boat hull, Paul?

Capacities:
Part size is dependent on press size. Currently, the largest hydroforming press available can churn out parts to nearly 20 ft. long, but typical parts are less than half that size, and can be produced in sizes down to a few inches. Cycle times are slower than traditional stamping methods.



Kevin

Edited: Link info

Paul Pless
02-22-2015, 02:31 PM
Interesting. ANd that boat looks fair, at least as can be seen in primer in a picture. Anyone have a link to recommend to learn more about this process?

Kevinits not primer, it left bare aluminum

Dan McCosh
02-22-2015, 02:38 PM
^Thank you, sir.

According to the link, the largest part typically made using the process is 20-feet long. Who made the boat hull, Paul?

Capacities:
Part size is dependent on press size. Currently, the largest hydroforming press available can churn out parts to nearly 20 ft. long, but typical parts are less than half that size, and can be produced in sizes down to a few inches. Cycle times are slower than traditional stamping methods.



Kevin

Edited: Link infoI think you are reading about hydroforming, which uses high-pressure water to press metal into a die. Explosive forming is for larger pieces, and uses an explosive charge to create the hydraulic pressure.

Canoeyawl
02-22-2015, 03:22 PM
http://nptel.ac.in/courses/112107144/Metal%20Forming%20&%20Powder%20metallurgy/lecture9/image/fig%201.jpg

Dan McCosh
02-22-2015, 03:26 PM
Maybe you put the die on the deck of a submarine, then depth-charge it.

Canoeyawl
02-22-2015, 03:46 PM
Maybe you put the die on the deck of a submarine, then depth-charge it.

Snicker...
You have to remove the liquid from under the die (a vacuum) for it to work - the diagram is oversimplified.

Dan McCosh
02-22-2015, 03:50 PM
I've seen regular hydroforming. It's kind like making balloon animals out of steel.

Canoeyawl
02-22-2015, 04:26 PM
I have a clutch/flywheel scatter-shield on my hot rod that was hydro formed, 1/4" steel plate, very consistent thickness.

PeterSibley
02-22-2015, 05:03 PM
Re my original comment , what would a mould be made of ? I assumed concrete and seem to remember a magazine article about someone forming a hull here in Australia like that some years back .

There are a few threads on BoatDesign about it too. http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/metal-boat-building/forming-compound-curves-heavy-aluminum-plate-15191.html

TR
02-22-2015, 05:08 PM
Explosive hydroforming in the back garden.....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGNrvmaxe8c

John B
02-23-2015, 02:56 AM
I've been on that boat , I even took photographs of it... wait.....

the_gr8t_waldo
02-23-2015, 11:10 AM
Last time I did a stint in a ship yard. I was introduced to explosive welded(or clad) composite.In that case it was aluminum clad to steel base. We used it to transsion from the steel of a basic steel tug to aluminum for an elevated pilot house about 30' above the ome one(with enclosed spiral staircase). Not cheap but it did work wonders.