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treesailor
02-13-2015, 06:15 PM
Are old fiberglass boats just trash waiting to go to the dump or are they recyclable?

Ian McColgin
02-13-2015, 06:17 PM
Bad fill. But if burned, highly toxic and polluting so crushing and dumping is probably the least damaging thing.

Binnacle Bat
02-13-2015, 07:01 PM
As Ian said, I don't thick there is any way to recycle polyester resin and glass.

They make good raised bed planters, assuming you make enough holes in the bottom so they drain well.

There's a few worth keeping as boats.

Allan

Figment
02-13-2015, 07:16 PM
I rather think scuttling as an artificial reef (after removing fuel and other pollutants of course) is better than crushing and land filling, but I could be underinformed.

Dan McCosh
02-13-2015, 07:20 PM
Fiberglass is ground and used as a filler for some composites. It also can be depolymerized, but that doesn't seem to be economical.

MN Dave
02-13-2015, 07:22 PM
Are old fiberglass boats just trash waiting to go to the dump or are they recyclable?
Yes. I have to agree with Ian.

A more detailed answer would indicate that it can be ground into a fine powder and mixed with concrete or more polyester as a filler, broken down into recyclable fiberglass powder and chemicals or burned in a concrete kiln, with some recovery of the energy content of the resin.

One glowing description (http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=5&ved=0CDwQFjAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mdpi.com%2F2073-4360%2F6%2F6%2F1810%2Fpdf&ei=O5reVICXKdDTgwTsx4CABA&usg=AFQjCNFfSxefSCQx_3AeSeX6bPu1j2wpPA&bvm=bv.85970519,d.eXY) of the results is: "FRP aggregates significantly reduce the strength of cementitious materials with little significant effect on durability." This may cost more than landfilling the stuff. The link has some good information.

Recycling_Composite_Boats (http://www.ericgreeneassociates.com/images/Recycling_Composite_Boats.pdf) goes into more possibilities.

Oldad
02-13-2015, 07:47 PM
At the risk of being tarred and feathered, there are and have been some decent designs in GRP. I picked up a totally wrecked Cape Dory 10 with the hopes of using it as a decent size dinghy to get out to my mooring. The holes were patched, the transom replaced and I have a mighty fine easy rowing dinghy for pennies and a couple dozen hours of my time. It will withstand the abuse and neglect that a dinghy must endure at a marina and when it needs it, I can patch it easily. If I had built a similar dinghy in expensive wood, all nicely varnished and Awlgripped, I would not sleep nights wondering and worrying as it bobbed about sparring for space at the dinghy dock. In short, IMHO, they have their place in the scheme of things.

Todd Bradshaw
02-13-2015, 08:20 PM
As long as they aren't stuffed full of soggy sheets of polyester fiberglass-covered plywood and you're decent at working with fiberglass, they can actually be kind of fun to fix up. I bought this one on the trailer for $800. It had been allowed to fill up with water and the pads had eventually broken through the hull. I patched the holes, did some minor blister repair, barrier-coated then painted the hull, refinished handrails, made a new tiller, built some covers, fixed up the sails, cleaned up and painted the trailer and it came out pretty nice. It all got done out in the driveway and it was cute enough that from day one I had strangers stopping by to see if I wanted to sell it when I got it done. It was a fun little bugger to sail and quite seaworthy for only being about 15' long. I made pretty good money when I finally did sell it, and I had three different buyers to choose from.

http://webpages.charter.net/tbradshaw/Sails%20and%20Plans/Nordica-1.jpg

http://webpages.charter.net/tbradshaw/Sails%20and%20Plans/nordica-4-copy.jpg

Gib Etheridge
02-13-2015, 08:53 PM
Nice job Todd. That is a cute one.

Lewisboater
02-13-2015, 09:59 PM
Wow... I actually like that one.... what was it?

Garret
02-13-2015, 10:32 PM
At the risk of being tarred and feathered, there are and have been some decent designs in GRP. I picked up a totally wrecked Cape Dory 10 with the hopes of using it as a decent size dinghy to get out to my mooring. The holes were patched, the transom replaced and I have a mighty fine easy rowing dinghy for pennies and a couple dozen hours of my time. It will withstand the abuse and neglect that a dinghy must endure at a marina and when it needs it, I can patch it easily. If I had built a similar dinghy in expensive wood, all nicely varnished and Awlgripped, I would not sleep nights wondering and worrying as it bobbed about sparring for space at the dinghy dock. In short, IMHO, they have their place in the scheme of things.

I've got a CD 10 & also a Dyer Dhow. Both great dinghies - though the CD is a much better rower.

Reynard38
02-13-2015, 11:03 PM
53 years old and going strong. Hull and decks still very sound. All the trim wood has been replaced.

http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w16/Reynard38/knickerbocker/imagejpg2.jpg (http://s172.photobucket.com/user/Reynard38/media/knickerbocker/imagejpg2.jpg.html)

Dan Payne
02-13-2015, 11:32 PM
Many fine, fine glass boats through the years. I'm a HUGE Cheoy Lee fan.
I just completed a lease arrangement on a Beneteau oceanus 461. Not a pretty boat, by any stretch, but it's sails like a dream.

Problem with glass boats today...when you restore hull number 1094 for $6000 and you could have bought hull number 5672 for $4000 floating and running
They don't represent a lasting value

Todd Bradshaw
02-14-2015, 12:33 AM
Wow... I actually like that one.... what was it?

A Nordica 16, built in Canada. The Nordicas and Halmans were related designs, all double-enders and ranging up to 27'. Pretty nice boats.

http://www.nordicaboats.com/html/nordica-16.html

Breakaway
02-14-2015, 02:13 AM
The Fiberglas is recyclable but taking apart the boat, removing all the fixtures, fittiings and fasteners is labor intensive. So boats aren't recycled.

Kevin

Sent from my iPhone using Forum Runner

DeniseO30
02-14-2015, 08:41 AM
If the natives of Easter island had FG, they may have not cut down the last tree.

CrosbyStriper
02-14-2015, 01:13 PM
Depends on the boat.
In my opinion, most should be scrapped. Save the bronze hardware, and any re-useable parts.

However, there are some that are worthwhile keeping around. Some of the early ones, Rhodes designs, Early Pearson's, etc. are nice, and have lots of wood trim. Those I dont mind seeing around. (Their hulls are also over an inch thick, so they are practically bullet proof.

JimConlin
02-14-2015, 05:35 PM
THe Alberg 35 (Pearson, 1962) I owned is still doing nicely. It will outlive me.

Reynard38
02-14-2015, 06:06 PM
Depends on the boat.
In my opinion, most should be scrapped. Save the bronze hardware, and any re-useable parts.

However, there are some that are worthwhile keeping around. Some of the early ones, Rhodes designs, Early Pearson's, etc. are nice, and have lots of wood trim. Those I dont mind seeing around. (Their hulls are also over an inch thick, so they are practically bullet proof.

Very true. When I installed the transducer for my depth sounder I was amazed at the thickness of the solid glass in the hull. Also these old boats aren't nearly as susceptible to the blistering issues that plagued later FG boats.
I really love my old KOD. Planning on taking her to SC when we move.

slug
02-14-2015, 10:23 PM
http://www.ericgreeneassociates.com/images/Recycling_Composite_Boats.pdf

http://www.reinforcedplastics.com/view/33969/recycling-glass-fibre-reinforced-composites-history-and-progress-part-1/

http://s15.postimg.org/j0bngbi9n/image.jpg (http://postimg.org/image/xjishqbef/full/)
screen capture freeware (http://postimage.org/app.php)

Michael D. Storey
02-15-2015, 08:24 AM
Depends on the boat.
In my opinion, most should be scrapped. Save the bronze hardware, and any re-useable parts.

However, there are some that are worthwhile keeping around. Some of the early ones, Rhodes designs, Early Pearson's, etc. are nice, and have lots of wood trim. Those I dont mind seeing around. (Their hulls are also over an inch thick, so they are practically bullet proof.
I consider this the key factor. Solid vs core. Especially balsa core. One leak left unattended and you end up as heavy as a solid boat. I reckon that this is why the pre-1965 boats are around and loved in a way that the laters are not.

sailnstink
02-15-2015, 09:12 AM
Somewhere on the web I saw a bunch of pictures of restored FG outboard speed/runabout types. Vintage 60-70's, not our cup of tea, but the folks did a fantastic job of bringing essentially old junk back to new or better. Lots of junk but as with wood anything can be saved.

paulf
02-15-2015, 10:12 AM
The local college has an associates program for composite recycling.

http://www.king5.com/story/tech/science/aerospace/2014/11/06/recycling-composites/18622471/