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Venchka
09-22-2003, 10:03 AM
The launch of Elisabeth Grace (19'-6" Caledonia yawl, 1,300 pounds maximum displacement) is rapidly approaching. Finally.

It is time to complete the ground tackle inventory. Initial primary cruising area will be the north central Gulf of Mexico. Bottom conditions: sand, mud and primordial ooze. Here's my plan, for your comments:

15 pound fisherman anchor-purchased and in the boat.
14 pound Danforth-not yet purchased
10 pound plastic coated treble hook contraption-it was my Dad's and if there is a place on the boat for it I plan to carry it. Mostly for sentimental reasons.
20' high strength 5/16" chain, weight = 22 pounds
10' same chain, weight = 11 pounds (on hand)
4' 1/4" chain for the treble hook anchor (on hand)
600' spool of 7/16" 3 strand nylon for anchor rodes, dock lines, etc.
I'm thinking that rodes of 100', 150' & 200' should see me through most anything I might encounter. That leaves 150' of 7/16" nylon rope for dock lines, etc.

What say ye?

Wayne
Soggy and way past ready for a launch in the Swamp.

Venchka
09-22-2003, 10:03 AM
The launch of Elisabeth Grace (19'-6" Caledonia yawl, 1,300 pounds maximum displacement) is rapidly approaching. Finally.

It is time to complete the ground tackle inventory. Initial primary cruising area will be the north central Gulf of Mexico. Bottom conditions: sand, mud and primordial ooze. Here's my plan, for your comments:

15 pound fisherman anchor-purchased and in the boat.
14 pound Danforth-not yet purchased
10 pound plastic coated treble hook contraption-it was my Dad's and if there is a place on the boat for it I plan to carry it. Mostly for sentimental reasons.
20' high strength 5/16" chain, weight = 22 pounds
10' same chain, weight = 11 pounds (on hand)
4' 1/4" chain for the treble hook anchor (on hand)
600' spool of 7/16" 3 strand nylon for anchor rodes, dock lines, etc.
I'm thinking that rodes of 100', 150' & 200' should see me through most anything I might encounter. That leaves 150' of 7/16" nylon rope for dock lines, etc.

What say ye?

Wayne
Soggy and way past ready for a launch in the Swamp.

Venchka
09-22-2003, 10:03 AM
The launch of Elisabeth Grace (19'-6" Caledonia yawl, 1,300 pounds maximum displacement) is rapidly approaching. Finally.

It is time to complete the ground tackle inventory. Initial primary cruising area will be the north central Gulf of Mexico. Bottom conditions: sand, mud and primordial ooze. Here's my plan, for your comments:

15 pound fisherman anchor-purchased and in the boat.
14 pound Danforth-not yet purchased
10 pound plastic coated treble hook contraption-it was my Dad's and if there is a place on the boat for it I plan to carry it. Mostly for sentimental reasons.
20' high strength 5/16" chain, weight = 22 pounds
10' same chain, weight = 11 pounds (on hand)
4' 1/4" chain for the treble hook anchor (on hand)
600' spool of 7/16" 3 strand nylon for anchor rodes, dock lines, etc.
I'm thinking that rodes of 100', 150' & 200' should see me through most anything I might encounter. That leaves 150' of 7/16" nylon rope for dock lines, etc.

What say ye?

Wayne
Soggy and way past ready for a launch in the Swamp.

NormMessinger
09-22-2003, 10:22 AM
You're gonna need a bigger boat to carry all that gear.

NormMessinger
09-22-2003, 10:22 AM
You're gonna need a bigger boat to carry all that gear.

NormMessinger
09-22-2003, 10:22 AM
You're gonna need a bigger boat to carry all that gear.

ishmael
09-22-2003, 10:29 AM
What Norm said. The fourteen lb. Danforth and 150 ft of nylon, with a ten foot leader of chain. Maybe a lunch hook, maybe a second rode, maybe a storm anchor if you're planning to weather the next hurricane afloat, but for general, seamanly sailing you've been reading too many books.

No fault, but get the Danforth and go out and use the boat for awhile before you buy all that other stuff.

ishmael
09-22-2003, 10:29 AM
What Norm said. The fourteen lb. Danforth and 150 ft of nylon, with a ten foot leader of chain. Maybe a lunch hook, maybe a second rode, maybe a storm anchor if you're planning to weather the next hurricane afloat, but for general, seamanly sailing you've been reading too many books.

No fault, but get the Danforth and go out and use the boat for awhile before you buy all that other stuff.

ishmael
09-22-2003, 10:29 AM
What Norm said. The fourteen lb. Danforth and 150 ft of nylon, with a ten foot leader of chain. Maybe a lunch hook, maybe a second rode, maybe a storm anchor if you're planning to weather the next hurricane afloat, but for general, seamanly sailing you've been reading too many books.

No fault, but get the Danforth and go out and use the boat for awhile before you buy all that other stuff.

ishmael
09-22-2003, 10:45 AM
A couple books you might like, Margaret Dye's Dinghy Cruising and Ian Nicolsen's Roving in Open Boats . The later is now out of print.

ishmael
09-22-2003, 10:45 AM
A couple books you might like, Margaret Dye's Dinghy Cruising and Ian Nicolsen's Roving in Open Boats . The later is now out of print.

ishmael
09-22-2003, 10:45 AM
A couple books you might like, Margaret Dye's Dinghy Cruising and Ian Nicolsen's Roving in Open Boats . The later is now out of print.

Scott Rosen
09-22-2003, 12:53 PM
I like a guy who shares my obsession with ground tackle.

I'd do it a little differently.

First, get a Fortress instead of a Danforth. The Fortress holds better, is stronger, sets easier and is much, much lighter. It's not expensive, either. And, it folds for easy stowage.

Second, You'll have three anchors, but only one of the ones you describe will actually work in your conditions. The fisherman will be a waste of space. It's too light to be of any use in sand, mud or ooze. The only thing it'll be good for is rocks/coral, in which case the grapnel may work just fine. If I were you, I'd get two Fortresses, an FX-7 (4lbs) for regular use and an FX-16 (10lbs) for storm use. Keep the storm size folded and stowed. If you want more variety and have some money to spend, you could get a CQR#15 instead of the lighter Fortress FX-7. Trouble with the CQR is that you will want a bow roller to store and deploy it, and that may not be suitable for your boat.

For rodes, I'd make one of them at least 250', preferably 300'. That's the one you will use to keep you off a lee shore in a blow. It will allow you to deploy the anchor in deep water, far away from any breakers, shoals or rocks.

Don't overdo it with the chain, unless you will be anchoring in rocky areas.

Good luck.

Scott Rosen
09-22-2003, 12:53 PM
I like a guy who shares my obsession with ground tackle.

I'd do it a little differently.

First, get a Fortress instead of a Danforth. The Fortress holds better, is stronger, sets easier and is much, much lighter. It's not expensive, either. And, it folds for easy stowage.

Second, You'll have three anchors, but only one of the ones you describe will actually work in your conditions. The fisherman will be a waste of space. It's too light to be of any use in sand, mud or ooze. The only thing it'll be good for is rocks/coral, in which case the grapnel may work just fine. If I were you, I'd get two Fortresses, an FX-7 (4lbs) for regular use and an FX-16 (10lbs) for storm use. Keep the storm size folded and stowed. If you want more variety and have some money to spend, you could get a CQR#15 instead of the lighter Fortress FX-7. Trouble with the CQR is that you will want a bow roller to store and deploy it, and that may not be suitable for your boat.

For rodes, I'd make one of them at least 250', preferably 300'. That's the one you will use to keep you off a lee shore in a blow. It will allow you to deploy the anchor in deep water, far away from any breakers, shoals or rocks.

Don't overdo it with the chain, unless you will be anchoring in rocky areas.

Good luck.

Scott Rosen
09-22-2003, 12:53 PM
I like a guy who shares my obsession with ground tackle.

I'd do it a little differently.

First, get a Fortress instead of a Danforth. The Fortress holds better, is stronger, sets easier and is much, much lighter. It's not expensive, either. And, it folds for easy stowage.

Second, You'll have three anchors, but only one of the ones you describe will actually work in your conditions. The fisherman will be a waste of space. It's too light to be of any use in sand, mud or ooze. The only thing it'll be good for is rocks/coral, in which case the grapnel may work just fine. If I were you, I'd get two Fortresses, an FX-7 (4lbs) for regular use and an FX-16 (10lbs) for storm use. Keep the storm size folded and stowed. If you want more variety and have some money to spend, you could get a CQR#15 instead of the lighter Fortress FX-7. Trouble with the CQR is that you will want a bow roller to store and deploy it, and that may not be suitable for your boat.

For rodes, I'd make one of them at least 250', preferably 300'. That's the one you will use to keep you off a lee shore in a blow. It will allow you to deploy the anchor in deep water, far away from any breakers, shoals or rocks.

Don't overdo it with the chain, unless you will be anchoring in rocky areas.

Good luck.

ishmael
09-22-2003, 01:10 PM
Either of the Fortresses or the Danforth discussed will do what you need. Remember, this is a small light boat.

I think wrangling 250 to 300 ft of nylon, considering the boat, is overkill, but maybe not. The boat only draws ten inches.

But definately, with those bottoms, a Danforth type. The fourteen pounder with 150 of rode would hold you, in those bottoms, in almost anything.

ishmael
09-22-2003, 01:10 PM
Either of the Fortresses or the Danforth discussed will do what you need. Remember, this is a small light boat.

I think wrangling 250 to 300 ft of nylon, considering the boat, is overkill, but maybe not. The boat only draws ten inches.

But definately, with those bottoms, a Danforth type. The fourteen pounder with 150 of rode would hold you, in those bottoms, in almost anything.

ishmael
09-22-2003, 01:10 PM
Either of the Fortresses or the Danforth discussed will do what you need. Remember, this is a small light boat.

I think wrangling 250 to 300 ft of nylon, considering the boat, is overkill, but maybe not. The boat only draws ten inches.

But definately, with those bottoms, a Danforth type. The fourteen pounder with 150 of rode would hold you, in those bottoms, in almost anything.

ishmael
09-22-2003, 02:11 PM
If ya think you're gonna need a really long rode I think two shorter ones that can be shackled together is good.

Remember this boat can anchor, comfortably, in water that is only three feet deep MLW.. And because of that it is likely to be anchored in more sheltered spots.

I've got this same thing going on sailing my Drascombe Lugger, esstentially the same boat, on the coast of Maine this fall and next year.

I've got 150' of nylon, with the chain, and an 11 lb. Bruce on the end. My main concern is not if the anchor will hold, or if I've got enough scope, it's how to retrieve what is essentially a grapnel from a rocky bottom.

Another question.

ishmael
09-22-2003, 02:11 PM
If ya think you're gonna need a really long rode I think two shorter ones that can be shackled together is good.

Remember this boat can anchor, comfortably, in water that is only three feet deep MLW.. And because of that it is likely to be anchored in more sheltered spots.

I've got this same thing going on sailing my Drascombe Lugger, esstentially the same boat, on the coast of Maine this fall and next year.

I've got 150' of nylon, with the chain, and an 11 lb. Bruce on the end. My main concern is not if the anchor will hold, or if I've got enough scope, it's how to retrieve what is essentially a grapnel from a rocky bottom.

Another question.

ishmael
09-22-2003, 02:11 PM
If ya think you're gonna need a really long rode I think two shorter ones that can be shackled together is good.

Remember this boat can anchor, comfortably, in water that is only three feet deep MLW.. And because of that it is likely to be anchored in more sheltered spots.

I've got this same thing going on sailing my Drascombe Lugger, esstentially the same boat, on the coast of Maine this fall and next year.

I've got 150' of nylon, with the chain, and an 11 lb. Bruce on the end. My main concern is not if the anchor will hold, or if I've got enough scope, it's how to retrieve what is essentially a grapnel from a rocky bottom.

Another question.

Venchka
09-22-2003, 02:23 PM
Fair enough, everyone.

For the time being, when the boat arrives I'll find a nice secure location for a 14lb. Danforth anchor (or the aluminum equivalent-funds permitting). Make up 2 or 3 100' rodes that can be shackled together end to end-good idea.

1/2" rode was mentioned above. I figure 3/8" would work. 1/2" seems like overkill maybe-or maybe not. Should I split hairs and buy 7/16"? Or feel perfectly secure with 1/2"?

I'll save the 15lb. fisherman and 22lbs. of 5/16" chain for the day when I'll be over a bottom which suits that anchor, be it rock or grass or kelp. By the way, the size was selected because it fits perfectly in the bilge between the centerboard case and forward bulkhead. The anchor is made in Canada so there was no border crossing involved to fit it to the boat. I will be anchoring over a rocky bottom some day. In the meantime, it's perfectly good ballast. :D

Thanks!

[ 09-22-2003, 02:34 PM: Message edited by: Venchka ]

Venchka
09-22-2003, 02:23 PM
Fair enough, everyone.

For the time being, when the boat arrives I'll find a nice secure location for a 14lb. Danforth anchor (or the aluminum equivalent-funds permitting). Make up 2 or 3 100' rodes that can be shackled together end to end-good idea.

1/2" rode was mentioned above. I figure 3/8" would work. 1/2" seems like overkill maybe-or maybe not. Should I split hairs and buy 7/16"? Or feel perfectly secure with 1/2"?

I'll save the 15lb. fisherman and 22lbs. of 5/16" chain for the day when I'll be over a bottom which suits that anchor, be it rock or grass or kelp. By the way, the size was selected because it fits perfectly in the bilge between the centerboard case and forward bulkhead. The anchor is made in Canada so there was no border crossing involved to fit it to the boat. I will be anchoring over a rocky bottom some day. In the meantime, it's perfectly good ballast. :D

Thanks!

[ 09-22-2003, 02:34 PM: Message edited by: Venchka ]

Venchka
09-22-2003, 02:23 PM
Fair enough, everyone.

For the time being, when the boat arrives I'll find a nice secure location for a 14lb. Danforth anchor (or the aluminum equivalent-funds permitting). Make up 2 or 3 100' rodes that can be shackled together end to end-good idea.

1/2" rode was mentioned above. I figure 3/8" would work. 1/2" seems like overkill maybe-or maybe not. Should I split hairs and buy 7/16"? Or feel perfectly secure with 1/2"?

I'll save the 15lb. fisherman and 22lbs. of 5/16" chain for the day when I'll be over a bottom which suits that anchor, be it rock or grass or kelp. By the way, the size was selected because it fits perfectly in the bilge between the centerboard case and forward bulkhead. The anchor is made in Canada so there was no border crossing involved to fit it to the boat. I will be anchoring over a rocky bottom some day. In the meantime, it's perfectly good ballast. :D

Thanks!

[ 09-22-2003, 02:34 PM: Message edited by: Venchka ]

ishmael
09-22-2003, 02:30 PM
The boat won't mind the fisherman as a bit of ballast.

It's an interesting question you asked, interesting to me anyway. Thank you.

No definitive answer, but I think what we've come round to here is pretty good. Try some of it, but don't buy a bunch of new gear until you need it.

Fair winds.

[ 09-22-2003, 02:31 PM: Message edited by: ishmael ]

ishmael
09-22-2003, 02:30 PM
The boat won't mind the fisherman as a bit of ballast.

It's an interesting question you asked, interesting to me anyway. Thank you.

No definitive answer, but I think what we've come round to here is pretty good. Try some of it, but don't buy a bunch of new gear until you need it.

Fair winds.

[ 09-22-2003, 02:31 PM: Message edited by: ishmael ]

ishmael
09-22-2003, 02:30 PM
The boat won't mind the fisherman as a bit of ballast.

It's an interesting question you asked, interesting to me anyway. Thank you.

No definitive answer, but I think what we've come round to here is pretty good. Try some of it, but don't buy a bunch of new gear until you need it.

Fair winds.

[ 09-22-2003, 02:31 PM: Message edited by: ishmael ]

Venchka
09-22-2003, 02:38 PM
Originally posted by ishmael:
The boat won't mind the fisherman as a bit of ballast.

Fair winds.Ishmael,

You were reading my mind as I was editing to add the part about ballast.

Thanks!

Venchka
09-22-2003, 02:38 PM
Originally posted by ishmael:
The boat won't mind the fisherman as a bit of ballast.

Fair winds.Ishmael,

You were reading my mind as I was editing to add the part about ballast.

Thanks!

Venchka
09-22-2003, 02:38 PM
Originally posted by ishmael:
The boat won't mind the fisherman as a bit of ballast.

Fair winds.Ishmael,

You were reading my mind as I was editing to add the part about ballast.

Thanks!

Bruce Hooke
09-22-2003, 02:41 PM
Remember that anchor rode lengths should be adjusted to suit the waters where the boat will sail. It's easy to find yourself wanting to anchor in 70' of water (or more) in Maine, whereas in other places, like the Florida Keys, just finding more than 50' of water is pretty near impossible and anyplace you might conceivably want to anchor would probably be under 20' deep.

Bruce Hooke
09-22-2003, 02:41 PM
Remember that anchor rode lengths should be adjusted to suit the waters where the boat will sail. It's easy to find yourself wanting to anchor in 70' of water (or more) in Maine, whereas in other places, like the Florida Keys, just finding more than 50' of water is pretty near impossible and anyplace you might conceivably want to anchor would probably be under 20' deep.

Bruce Hooke
09-22-2003, 02:41 PM
Remember that anchor rode lengths should be adjusted to suit the waters where the boat will sail. It's easy to find yourself wanting to anchor in 70' of water (or more) in Maine, whereas in other places, like the Florida Keys, just finding more than 50' of water is pretty near impossible and anyplace you might conceivably want to anchor would probably be under 20' deep.

Bruce Hooke
09-22-2003, 03:51 PM
Donn, I meant more in amongst and behind the keys, rather than out at the reefs, but my memory could also be failing me because it's been 15 years since I was down there. In any case, my point was that some waters call for much longer anchor rode than other waters. Maybe I should have used the Chesapeake as my example rather than the keys.

Bruce Hooke
09-22-2003, 03:51 PM
Donn, I meant more in amongst and behind the keys, rather than out at the reefs, but my memory could also be failing me because it's been 15 years since I was down there. In any case, my point was that some waters call for much longer anchor rode than other waters. Maybe I should have used the Chesapeake as my example rather than the keys.

Bruce Hooke
09-22-2003, 03:51 PM
Donn, I meant more in amongst and behind the keys, rather than out at the reefs, but my memory could also be failing me because it's been 15 years since I was down there. In any case, my point was that some waters call for much longer anchor rode than other waters. Maybe I should have used the Chesapeake as my example rather than the keys.

NormMessinger
09-22-2003, 04:06 PM
Yaall think 1/2" has enough stretch to work properly with a boat that small? On the other hand because it is small and light it wont have much force when it come up tight on the rode.

NormMessinger
09-22-2003, 04:06 PM
Yaall think 1/2" has enough stretch to work properly with a boat that small? On the other hand because it is small and light it wont have much force when it come up tight on the rode.

NormMessinger
09-22-2003, 04:06 PM
Yaall think 1/2" has enough stretch to work properly with a boat that small? On the other hand because it is small and light it wont have much force when it come up tight on the rode.

Ariel
09-22-2003, 04:11 PM
Hi! Wayne, I sail the Gulf Coast in a 1-ton sloop and my ground tackle includes a Bruce + 20' of chain and a medium Danforth both with 75 to 100' of line. I have sailed from Mobile to Madisonville, LA and east to Carrabelle, FL and never dragged. Love the barrier islands! The Bruce I particularly like because the Danforth can get things stuck in the flukes--once a piece of chain from a wrecked shrimpboat got hung up in the flukes--also, the Bruce buries itself quickly and holds well in seaweed and clay. It is also easy to pull up and being a single-handed small person that is a distinct advantage for me!

Congratulations on your new boat--I hope you enjoy your sailing experiences as much as I have over the past 23 years.

Ariel
09-22-2003, 04:11 PM
Hi! Wayne, I sail the Gulf Coast in a 1-ton sloop and my ground tackle includes a Bruce + 20' of chain and a medium Danforth both with 75 to 100' of line. I have sailed from Mobile to Madisonville, LA and east to Carrabelle, FL and never dragged. Love the barrier islands! The Bruce I particularly like because the Danforth can get things stuck in the flukes--once a piece of chain from a wrecked shrimpboat got hung up in the flukes--also, the Bruce buries itself quickly and holds well in seaweed and clay. It is also easy to pull up and being a single-handed small person that is a distinct advantage for me!

Congratulations on your new boat--I hope you enjoy your sailing experiences as much as I have over the past 23 years.

Ariel
09-22-2003, 04:11 PM
Hi! Wayne, I sail the Gulf Coast in a 1-ton sloop and my ground tackle includes a Bruce + 20' of chain and a medium Danforth both with 75 to 100' of line. I have sailed from Mobile to Madisonville, LA and east to Carrabelle, FL and never dragged. Love the barrier islands! The Bruce I particularly like because the Danforth can get things stuck in the flukes--once a piece of chain from a wrecked shrimpboat got hung up in the flukes--also, the Bruce buries itself quickly and holds well in seaweed and clay. It is also easy to pull up and being a single-handed small person that is a distinct advantage for me!

Congratulations on your new boat--I hope you enjoy your sailing experiences as much as I have over the past 23 years.

Scott Rosen
09-22-2003, 04:34 PM
Get the 1/2" nylon. You won't regret it. Even if you never need the extra strength, view it as chafe protection.

Scott Rosen
09-22-2003, 04:34 PM
Get the 1/2" nylon. You won't regret it. Even if you never need the extra strength, view it as chafe protection.

Scott Rosen
09-22-2003, 04:34 PM
Get the 1/2" nylon. You won't regret it. Even if you never need the extra strength, view it as chafe protection.

ishmael
09-22-2003, 05:37 PM
Agreed. 1/2 is the smallest that is workable for this, because of your hands.

[ 09-22-2003, 05:39 PM: Message edited by: ishmael ]

ishmael
09-22-2003, 05:37 PM
Agreed. 1/2 is the smallest that is workable for this, because of your hands.

[ 09-22-2003, 05:39 PM: Message edited by: ishmael ]

ishmael
09-22-2003, 05:37 PM
Agreed. 1/2 is the smallest that is workable for this, because of your hands.

[ 09-22-2003, 05:39 PM: Message edited by: ishmael ]

Venchka
09-22-2003, 05:46 PM
Thanks everyone!

I'm only a little more confused than I was! :confused:

1/2" 3-strand nylon it is! On sale now at Hamilton Marine! :D

I suppose when the boat gets here, I'll take it to Worst Marine & see what fits in the bilge. Am I cheeky enough to determnine which anchor fits in the boat and then order elsewhere? Hmmmmmmmm...no, that would be rude! smile.gif

Venchka
09-22-2003, 05:46 PM
Thanks everyone!

I'm only a little more confused than I was! :confused:

1/2" 3-strand nylon it is! On sale now at Hamilton Marine! :D

I suppose when the boat gets here, I'll take it to Worst Marine & see what fits in the bilge. Am I cheeky enough to determnine which anchor fits in the boat and then order elsewhere? Hmmmmmmmm...no, that would be rude! smile.gif

Venchka
09-22-2003, 05:46 PM
Thanks everyone!

I'm only a little more confused than I was! :confused:

1/2" 3-strand nylon it is! On sale now at Hamilton Marine! :D

I suppose when the boat gets here, I'll take it to Worst Marine & see what fits in the bilge. Am I cheeky enough to determnine which anchor fits in the boat and then order elsewhere? Hmmmmmmmm...no, that would be rude! smile.gif

Dave Hadfield
09-23-2003, 11:40 AM
I too agree that beaucoup ground tackle is the Grail.

I'd say take a lot, as per your original plan, plus perhaps the fortress, live with it all in the boat for a while, and at the end of 2 years cruising make a choice based on what you've used and when you dragged.

As for the fisherman, I have a Northill, which is similar, and even though it's a bit small for the boat it's the only one of the 4 types I have on board that has never dragged.

Don't forget that 2 anchors hooked together in series is about as solid as you can get (and a greatly conforting thought when the wind howls in the pitch dark at 03:00AM), and here your small fisherman might be just right.

Having the pieces of a sentinel on hand for assembly is also a fine thing. For your boat a good one can be made from 2 10lb weights from a barbel exercise set. Lowering these down the rode on a snatch block makes quite a difference, particularly if you're in a crowd and haven't got the 7:1 ratio which you know you should have. The unit takes the shock out of the gusts.

But try to use the 7:1 (and that's to the top of the water). The vast majority of dragging anchors is caused by those who shorten up on this.

Dave Hadfield
09-23-2003, 11:40 AM
I too agree that beaucoup ground tackle is the Grail.

I'd say take a lot, as per your original plan, plus perhaps the fortress, live with it all in the boat for a while, and at the end of 2 years cruising make a choice based on what you've used and when you dragged.

As for the fisherman, I have a Northill, which is similar, and even though it's a bit small for the boat it's the only one of the 4 types I have on board that has never dragged.

Don't forget that 2 anchors hooked together in series is about as solid as you can get (and a greatly conforting thought when the wind howls in the pitch dark at 03:00AM), and here your small fisherman might be just right.

Having the pieces of a sentinel on hand for assembly is also a fine thing. For your boat a good one can be made from 2 10lb weights from a barbel exercise set. Lowering these down the rode on a snatch block makes quite a difference, particularly if you're in a crowd and haven't got the 7:1 ratio which you know you should have. The unit takes the shock out of the gusts.

But try to use the 7:1 (and that's to the top of the water). The vast majority of dragging anchors is caused by those who shorten up on this.

Dave Hadfield
09-23-2003, 11:40 AM
I too agree that beaucoup ground tackle is the Grail.

I'd say take a lot, as per your original plan, plus perhaps the fortress, live with it all in the boat for a while, and at the end of 2 years cruising make a choice based on what you've used and when you dragged.

As for the fisherman, I have a Northill, which is similar, and even though it's a bit small for the boat it's the only one of the 4 types I have on board that has never dragged.

Don't forget that 2 anchors hooked together in series is about as solid as you can get (and a greatly conforting thought when the wind howls in the pitch dark at 03:00AM), and here your small fisherman might be just right.

Having the pieces of a sentinel on hand for assembly is also a fine thing. For your boat a good one can be made from 2 10lb weights from a barbel exercise set. Lowering these down the rode on a snatch block makes quite a difference, particularly if you're in a crowd and haven't got the 7:1 ratio which you know you should have. The unit takes the shock out of the gusts.

But try to use the 7:1 (and that's to the top of the water). The vast majority of dragging anchors is caused by those who shorten up on this.

Ross Faneuf
09-24-2003, 10:08 PM
I'm curious why you're using 5/16" chain. That's what I have for my 36'/17000# boat. Cruising rode is 30' 5/16" chain + 250' 5/8 3-strand nylon, storm rode is 30' 3/8 chain + 250' 3/4 3-strand nylon. Cruising anchor is 35# Delta, storm is 60# danforth.

I would think you would do well with a longer length of 1/4" chain; it should be plenty strong enough for your size boat.

Ross Faneuf
09-24-2003, 10:08 PM
I'm curious why you're using 5/16" chain. That's what I have for my 36'/17000# boat. Cruising rode is 30' 5/16" chain + 250' 5/8 3-strand nylon, storm rode is 30' 3/8 chain + 250' 3/4 3-strand nylon. Cruising anchor is 35# Delta, storm is 60# danforth.

I would think you would do well with a longer length of 1/4" chain; it should be plenty strong enough for your size boat.

Ross Faneuf
09-24-2003, 10:08 PM
I'm curious why you're using 5/16" chain. That's what I have for my 36'/17000# boat. Cruising rode is 30' 5/16" chain + 250' 5/8 3-strand nylon, storm rode is 30' 3/8 chain + 250' 3/4 3-strand nylon. Cruising anchor is 35# Delta, storm is 60# danforth.

I would think you would do well with a longer length of 1/4" chain; it should be plenty strong enough for your size boat.

Venchka
09-25-2003, 01:49 PM
Originally posted by Ross Faneuf:
I'm curious why you're using 5/16" chain.
Ross,

At the moment my chain inventory consists of 4' of 1/4" chain and 10' of 5/16" chain. The 1/4" is old and once held my motorcycle to whatever I could find. The 5/16" is new. I suppose I bought it because it may have been incorrectly priced at Lowe's. The price of the 5/16" was less than the 1/4". I also appreciate the extra weight for a given length. Surpisingly, 10' of 5/16" chain is about the size of a quart jar. When I am ready to go farther afield, I may get 20' of 1/4" instead of another 20' of 5/16".

The other reason for 5/16" chain is that I've been brainwashed at work. We design, build and rent heavy lifting apparatus and rigging. 5:1 safety factors are normal. I think our heaviest lift to date is on the order of 10,000+ TONS. 22+ years and none of our lifting equipment or rigging has broken. Knock on wood!

I did back down a little on the Danforth anchor. I opted for the 9lb. instead of the 14lb.

Now I need the time to go places where I will need to use all this ground tackle!

Venchka
09-25-2003, 01:49 PM
Originally posted by Ross Faneuf:
I'm curious why you're using 5/16" chain.
Ross,

At the moment my chain inventory consists of 4' of 1/4" chain and 10' of 5/16" chain. The 1/4" is old and once held my motorcycle to whatever I could find. The 5/16" is new. I suppose I bought it because it may have been incorrectly priced at Lowe's. The price of the 5/16" was less than the 1/4". I also appreciate the extra weight for a given length. Surpisingly, 10' of 5/16" chain is about the size of a quart jar. When I am ready to go farther afield, I may get 20' of 1/4" instead of another 20' of 5/16".

The other reason for 5/16" chain is that I've been brainwashed at work. We design, build and rent heavy lifting apparatus and rigging. 5:1 safety factors are normal. I think our heaviest lift to date is on the order of 10,000+ TONS. 22+ years and none of our lifting equipment or rigging has broken. Knock on wood!

I did back down a little on the Danforth anchor. I opted for the 9lb. instead of the 14lb.

Now I need the time to go places where I will need to use all this ground tackle!

Venchka
09-25-2003, 01:49 PM
Originally posted by Ross Faneuf:
I'm curious why you're using 5/16" chain.
Ross,

At the moment my chain inventory consists of 4' of 1/4" chain and 10' of 5/16" chain. The 1/4" is old and once held my motorcycle to whatever I could find. The 5/16" is new. I suppose I bought it because it may have been incorrectly priced at Lowe's. The price of the 5/16" was less than the 1/4". I also appreciate the extra weight for a given length. Surpisingly, 10' of 5/16" chain is about the size of a quart jar. When I am ready to go farther afield, I may get 20' of 1/4" instead of another 20' of 5/16".

The other reason for 5/16" chain is that I've been brainwashed at work. We design, build and rent heavy lifting apparatus and rigging. 5:1 safety factors are normal. I think our heaviest lift to date is on the order of 10,000+ TONS. 22+ years and none of our lifting equipment or rigging has broken. Knock on wood!

I did back down a little on the Danforth anchor. I opted for the 9lb. instead of the 14lb.

Now I need the time to go places where I will need to use all this ground tackle!

Venchka
10-02-2003, 11:58 AM
Originally posted by NormMessinger:
You're gonna need a bigger boat to carry all that gear.Yo, Norm!

You might be right. To quote a local car salesman, "That's a lot of rope, Paw Paw!" The 600' spool of nylon line arrived yesterday from You know who Marine. Why didn't somebody tell me how heavy 600' of nylon is????? :D So heavy that it split the box and some of the shackles fell out. No worries, You know who Marine is sending some more at no charge.

Elisabeth Grace arrives this weekend. :D

Venchka
10-02-2003, 11:58 AM
Originally posted by NormMessinger:
You're gonna need a bigger boat to carry all that gear.Yo, Norm!

You might be right. To quote a local car salesman, "That's a lot of rope, Paw Paw!" The 600' spool of nylon line arrived yesterday from You know who Marine. Why didn't somebody tell me how heavy 600' of nylon is????? :D So heavy that it split the box and some of the shackles fell out. No worries, You know who Marine is sending some more at no charge.

Elisabeth Grace arrives this weekend. :D

Venchka
10-02-2003, 11:58 AM
Originally posted by NormMessinger:
You're gonna need a bigger boat to carry all that gear.Yo, Norm!

You might be right. To quote a local car salesman, "That's a lot of rope, Paw Paw!" The 600' spool of nylon line arrived yesterday from You know who Marine. Why didn't somebody tell me how heavy 600' of nylon is????? :D So heavy that it split the box and some of the shackles fell out. No worries, You know who Marine is sending some more at no charge.

Elisabeth Grace arrives this weekend. :D

ishmael
10-02-2003, 12:12 PM
I warned ya that much line was gonna be a lot to wrangle. Finding a way to coil it so it's usable on such a small boat is a challenge. Dividing it might still be the way to go. I've seen arrangements with a spool mounted under the foredeck, but 300 ft. of 1/2 inch nylon is obstreperous. Hey, you'll get to practice your coiling.

Have fun. smile.gif

ishmael
10-02-2003, 12:12 PM
I warned ya that much line was gonna be a lot to wrangle. Finding a way to coil it so it's usable on such a small boat is a challenge. Dividing it might still be the way to go. I've seen arrangements with a spool mounted under the foredeck, but 300 ft. of 1/2 inch nylon is obstreperous. Hey, you'll get to practice your coiling.

Have fun. smile.gif

ishmael
10-02-2003, 12:12 PM
I warned ya that much line was gonna be a lot to wrangle. Finding a way to coil it so it's usable on such a small boat is a challenge. Dividing it might still be the way to go. I've seen arrangements with a spool mounted under the foredeck, but 300 ft. of 1/2 inch nylon is obstreperous. Hey, you'll get to practice your coiling.

Have fun. smile.gif

Venchka
10-02-2003, 12:23 PM
Originally posted by Donn:
Wayne, you must be beside yourself with anticipation. No kidding. And sitting here in the office playing like I'm working, too. They should be somewhere between Hamilton Marine and the Hudson River about now.


Originally posted by ishmael:
I warned ya that much line was gonna be a lot to wrangle. ... but 300 ft. of 1/2 inch nylon is obstreperous. Hey, you'll get to practice your coiling.

Have fun. smile.gif Say what? Ob-which? Can you say that word on the Forum? No worries. If I ever get to where I want to go that I'll need 300'+ of 1/2" line it will be worth the struggle to stow that much line. I'm going to unspool 3 100' lengths tonight and start splicing thimbles in the ends.

Got to keep busy and not watch the clock. :D

Venchka
10-02-2003, 12:23 PM
Originally posted by Donn:
Wayne, you must be beside yourself with anticipation. No kidding. And sitting here in the office playing like I'm working, too. They should be somewhere between Hamilton Marine and the Hudson River about now.


Originally posted by ishmael:
I warned ya that much line was gonna be a lot to wrangle. ... but 300 ft. of 1/2 inch nylon is obstreperous. Hey, you'll get to practice your coiling.

Have fun. smile.gif Say what? Ob-which? Can you say that word on the Forum? No worries. If I ever get to where I want to go that I'll need 300'+ of 1/2" line it will be worth the struggle to stow that much line. I'm going to unspool 3 100' lengths tonight and start splicing thimbles in the ends.

Got to keep busy and not watch the clock. :D

Venchka
10-02-2003, 12:23 PM
Originally posted by Donn:
Wayne, you must be beside yourself with anticipation. No kidding. And sitting here in the office playing like I'm working, too. They should be somewhere between Hamilton Marine and the Hudson River about now.


Originally posted by ishmael:
I warned ya that much line was gonna be a lot to wrangle. ... but 300 ft. of 1/2 inch nylon is obstreperous. Hey, you'll get to practice your coiling.

Have fun. smile.gif Say what? Ob-which? Can you say that word on the Forum? No worries. If I ever get to where I want to go that I'll need 300'+ of 1/2" line it will be worth the struggle to stow that much line. I'm going to unspool 3 100' lengths tonight and start splicing thimbles in the ends.

Got to keep busy and not watch the clock. :D

NormMessinger
10-02-2003, 12:47 PM
No one has addressed my question about the shock loading of a little boat fetching up on heavy cable. This is a Caladonia Yawl we're talking about here, right?

NormMessinger
10-02-2003, 12:47 PM
No one has addressed my question about the shock loading of a little boat fetching up on heavy cable. This is a Caladonia Yawl we're talking about here, right?

NormMessinger
10-02-2003, 12:47 PM
No one has addressed my question about the shock loading of a little boat fetching up on heavy cable. This is a Caladonia Yawl we're talking about here, right?

High C
10-02-2003, 11:10 PM
Originally posted by ishmael:
I warned ya that much line was gonna be a lot to wrangle. Finding a way to coil it so it's usable on such a small boat is a challenge.Boy, I'll say. I bought a 300' 5/8 rode for the storm anchor on my 30 footer, and I just couldn't handle the dern thing. I could barely lift it, and it was hell to coil. I finally gave up on it and went back to 1/2 for that anchor. Ish, I like your idea of shortening it. I think I'll cut it in half and shackle the halves together. Half the weight! Thanks. smile.gif

On my Weekender, 16' OD and 600 lbs, I just set up the anchor today, a whopping 4 lb. Hooker Danforth type with 6' of 1/4" chain and a 150' 3/8 rode. It's nice handling small ground tackle for a change.

High C
10-02-2003, 11:10 PM
Originally posted by ishmael:
I warned ya that much line was gonna be a lot to wrangle. Finding a way to coil it so it's usable on such a small boat is a challenge.Boy, I'll say. I bought a 300' 5/8 rode for the storm anchor on my 30 footer, and I just couldn't handle the dern thing. I could barely lift it, and it was hell to coil. I finally gave up on it and went back to 1/2 for that anchor. Ish, I like your idea of shortening it. I think I'll cut it in half and shackle the halves together. Half the weight! Thanks. smile.gif

On my Weekender, 16' OD and 600 lbs, I just set up the anchor today, a whopping 4 lb. Hooker Danforth type with 6' of 1/4" chain and a 150' 3/8 rode. It's nice handling small ground tackle for a change.

High C
10-02-2003, 11:10 PM
Originally posted by ishmael:
I warned ya that much line was gonna be a lot to wrangle. Finding a way to coil it so it's usable on such a small boat is a challenge.Boy, I'll say. I bought a 300' 5/8 rode for the storm anchor on my 30 footer, and I just couldn't handle the dern thing. I could barely lift it, and it was hell to coil. I finally gave up on it and went back to 1/2 for that anchor. Ish, I like your idea of shortening it. I think I'll cut it in half and shackle the halves together. Half the weight! Thanks. smile.gif

On my Weekender, 16' OD and 600 lbs, I just set up the anchor today, a whopping 4 lb. Hooker Danforth type with 6' of 1/4" chain and a 150' 3/8 rode. It's nice handling small ground tackle for a change.

Venchka
10-03-2003, 11:54 AM
Originally posted by NormMessinger:
No one has addressed my question about the shock loading of a little boat fetching up on heavy cable. This is a Caladonia Yawl we're talking about here, right?Correct, Norm. Caledonia yawl. I would like to know as well. On the one hand, 3/8" seemed a little light for anywhere but down here on the Gulf Coast in good weather. 1/2" seemed more appropriate for far off places. Deep water, rocky bottoms, more tide range, more wind, etc. If I screwed up too badly, anyone want to buy a spool of 1/2" 3 strand nylon? :confused:

Worst case for now, 2 100' warps of 1/2" nylon won't be too much to handle.

Venchka
10-03-2003, 11:54 AM
Originally posted by NormMessinger:
No one has addressed my question about the shock loading of a little boat fetching up on heavy cable. This is a Caladonia Yawl we're talking about here, right?Correct, Norm. Caledonia yawl. I would like to know as well. On the one hand, 3/8" seemed a little light for anywhere but down here on the Gulf Coast in good weather. 1/2" seemed more appropriate for far off places. Deep water, rocky bottoms, more tide range, more wind, etc. If I screwed up too badly, anyone want to buy a spool of 1/2" 3 strand nylon? :confused:

Worst case for now, 2 100' warps of 1/2" nylon won't be too much to handle.

Venchka
10-03-2003, 11:54 AM
Originally posted by NormMessinger:
No one has addressed my question about the shock loading of a little boat fetching up on heavy cable. This is a Caladonia Yawl we're talking about here, right?Correct, Norm. Caledonia yawl. I would like to know as well. On the one hand, 3/8" seemed a little light for anywhere but down here on the Gulf Coast in good weather. 1/2" seemed more appropriate for far off places. Deep water, rocky bottoms, more tide range, more wind, etc. If I screwed up too badly, anyone want to buy a spool of 1/2" 3 strand nylon? :confused:

Worst case for now, 2 100' warps of 1/2" nylon won't be too much to handle.