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Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
12-26-2003, 11:51 PM
Does anyone have experience with the cordless ones? I'm thinking of buying one and would like to know the advantages or disadvantages of cordless and corded Dremels.

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
12-26-2003, 11:51 PM
Does anyone have experience with the cordless ones? I'm thinking of buying one and would like to know the advantages or disadvantages of cordless and corded Dremels.

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
12-26-2003, 11:51 PM
Does anyone have experience with the cordless ones? I'm thinking of buying one and would like to know the advantages or disadvantages of cordless and corded Dremels.

John A. Campbell
12-27-2003, 12:53 AM
I have both types.....an old corded model 280 with ball bearings that I bought in the late '60's and a later model cordless one that's about 10 years old. I think it's all about what you intend to do with them. For example, if I'm going to cut off a piece of brass tubing or any other metal cutting operation, I reach for the corded one. For model construction (my "thing" is model boats) the cordless one gets about 90% of the work. It's more suitable for delicate sanding, cutting, and other detailed operations involving wooden models and one reason for this is the fact that you don't have that cord hanging on the end of it. I bought my son one of the new "lithium ion" models for Christmas and I believe I'll get one for myself

John A. Campbell
12-27-2003, 12:53 AM
I have both types.....an old corded model 280 with ball bearings that I bought in the late '60's and a later model cordless one that's about 10 years old. I think it's all about what you intend to do with them. For example, if I'm going to cut off a piece of brass tubing or any other metal cutting operation, I reach for the corded one. For model construction (my "thing" is model boats) the cordless one gets about 90% of the work. It's more suitable for delicate sanding, cutting, and other detailed operations involving wooden models and one reason for this is the fact that you don't have that cord hanging on the end of it. I bought my son one of the new "lithium ion" models for Christmas and I believe I'll get one for myself

John A. Campbell
12-27-2003, 12:53 AM
I have both types.....an old corded model 280 with ball bearings that I bought in the late '60's and a later model cordless one that's about 10 years old. I think it's all about what you intend to do with them. For example, if I'm going to cut off a piece of brass tubing or any other metal cutting operation, I reach for the corded one. For model construction (my "thing" is model boats) the cordless one gets about 90% of the work. It's more suitable for delicate sanding, cutting, and other detailed operations involving wooden models and one reason for this is the fact that you don't have that cord hanging on the end of it. I bought my son one of the new "lithium ion" models for Christmas and I believe I'll get one for myself

htom
12-27-2003, 01:13 AM
There are three (four?) cordless Dremels.

The smallest is only really good for drilling really tiny holes in circuit board.

The middle-sized one I haven't used.

The larger (9.6V, # 780) is very nicely balanced. The single battery will run it for an hour or three or four, depending on how steadily and how fast you run it. My biggest complaint is that the dial for setting speed is marked 0 1 2 ... 10 rather than 0 1k 2k ... 35k RPM, and there's no "positive off" other than pulling the battery. You can get spare batteries; I'd guess that with two spares and chargers you could run it until your hand couldn't hold it.

If I was going to be using it for production use, the corded one might be more powerful, and not have the recharging to deal with; but the cordless balances better than either the corded or a long flexy shaft.

htom
12-27-2003, 01:13 AM
There are three (four?) cordless Dremels.

The smallest is only really good for drilling really tiny holes in circuit board.

The middle-sized one I haven't used.

The larger (9.6V, # 780) is very nicely balanced. The single battery will run it for an hour or three or four, depending on how steadily and how fast you run it. My biggest complaint is that the dial for setting speed is marked 0 1 2 ... 10 rather than 0 1k 2k ... 35k RPM, and there's no "positive off" other than pulling the battery. You can get spare batteries; I'd guess that with two spares and chargers you could run it until your hand couldn't hold it.

If I was going to be using it for production use, the corded one might be more powerful, and not have the recharging to deal with; but the cordless balances better than either the corded or a long flexy shaft.

htom
12-27-2003, 01:13 AM
There are three (four?) cordless Dremels.

The smallest is only really good for drilling really tiny holes in circuit board.

The middle-sized one I haven't used.

The larger (9.6V, # 780) is very nicely balanced. The single battery will run it for an hour or three or four, depending on how steadily and how fast you run it. My biggest complaint is that the dial for setting speed is marked 0 1 2 ... 10 rather than 0 1k 2k ... 35k RPM, and there's no "positive off" other than pulling the battery. You can get spare batteries; I'd guess that with two spares and chargers you could run it until your hand couldn't hold it.

If I was going to be using it for production use, the corded one might be more powerful, and not have the recharging to deal with; but the cordless balances better than either the corded or a long flexy shaft.

Meerkat
12-27-2003, 03:23 AM
I think the new lithium one is 10.4 V.

Meerkat
12-27-2003, 03:23 AM
I think the new lithium one is 10.4 V.

Meerkat
12-27-2003, 03:23 AM
I think the new lithium one is 10.4 V.

oldriverat
12-27-2003, 11:26 PM
In my opinion, no battery powered tool can match the overall performance and durabilty of a 120V model.

The only battery tool I've ever had and liked was a cordless drill. It was a Makita and didn't last through the construction of my Diablo. I had to finish up the job with an old B&D corded model.

[ 12-27-2003, 11:27 PM: Message edited by: Memphis Mike ]

oldriverat
12-27-2003, 11:26 PM
In my opinion, no battery powered tool can match the overall performance and durabilty of a 120V model.

The only battery tool I've ever had and liked was a cordless drill. It was a Makita and didn't last through the construction of my Diablo. I had to finish up the job with an old B&D corded model.

[ 12-27-2003, 11:27 PM: Message edited by: Memphis Mike ]

oldriverat
12-27-2003, 11:26 PM
In my opinion, no battery powered tool can match the overall performance and durabilty of a 120V model.

The only battery tool I've ever had and liked was a cordless drill. It was a Makita and didn't last through the construction of my Diablo. I had to finish up the job with an old B&D corded model.

[ 12-27-2003, 11:27 PM: Message edited by: Memphis Mike ]

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
12-28-2003, 11:29 AM
Thanks for the advice! smile.gif One of my concerns was the attachments.The cordless doesn't seem to be able to use all the attachments that the corded does. Any opinions or experience with that?

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
12-28-2003, 11:29 AM
Thanks for the advice! smile.gif One of my concerns was the attachments.The cordless doesn't seem to be able to use all the attachments that the corded does. Any opinions or experience with that?

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
12-28-2003, 11:29 AM
Thanks for the advice! smile.gif One of my concerns was the attachments.The cordless doesn't seem to be able to use all the attachments that the corded does. Any opinions or experience with that?

htom
12-29-2003, 12:55 AM
I don't know of any that I ever used on the corded Dremal that I can't use on the 780 (but they're adding them all the time, too, so....) Perhaps the part numbers have changed, or the webpage hasn't been updated, or you're looking at an accessory for one of the other tools?

The smaller cordless units have a different size threaded nose so that you can't use some of the accessories with them.

www.dremel.com (http://www.dremel.com)

htom
12-29-2003, 12:55 AM
I don't know of any that I ever used on the corded Dremal that I can't use on the 780 (but they're adding them all the time, too, so....) Perhaps the part numbers have changed, or the webpage hasn't been updated, or you're looking at an accessory for one of the other tools?

The smaller cordless units have a different size threaded nose so that you can't use some of the accessories with them.

www.dremel.com (http://www.dremel.com)

htom
12-29-2003, 12:55 AM
I don't know of any that I ever used on the corded Dremal that I can't use on the 780 (but they're adding them all the time, too, so....) Perhaps the part numbers have changed, or the webpage hasn't been updated, or you're looking at an accessory for one of the other tools?

The smaller cordless units have a different size threaded nose so that you can't use some of the accessories with them.

www.dremel.com (http://www.dremel.com)

Paul H
12-30-2003, 03:05 PM
I found that I was always trying to make a dremel do more then it was really up too. What I found was a much more useful tool was to hook a foredom flex shaft up to a Makita 1/4" die grinder, and use a foredom handpiece. Since I already had the makita die grinder, the 1/4" flexshaft at ~$25 was a much more economical route than ~$200 for the foredom.

Since switching I haven't had the bog down problems that the dremel had, and I can also run 1/4" shank carbide burrs, and larger diameter cut off wheels.

I've never missed dremel, and find the more compact foredom handpiece to be more comfortable to use. I use a variac to vary the speed of the motor.

Paul H
12-30-2003, 03:05 PM
I found that I was always trying to make a dremel do more then it was really up too. What I found was a much more useful tool was to hook a foredom flex shaft up to a Makita 1/4" die grinder, and use a foredom handpiece. Since I already had the makita die grinder, the 1/4" flexshaft at ~$25 was a much more economical route than ~$200 for the foredom.

Since switching I haven't had the bog down problems that the dremel had, and I can also run 1/4" shank carbide burrs, and larger diameter cut off wheels.

I've never missed dremel, and find the more compact foredom handpiece to be more comfortable to use. I use a variac to vary the speed of the motor.

Paul H
12-30-2003, 03:05 PM
I found that I was always trying to make a dremel do more then it was really up too. What I found was a much more useful tool was to hook a foredom flex shaft up to a Makita 1/4" die grinder, and use a foredom handpiece. Since I already had the makita die grinder, the 1/4" flexshaft at ~$25 was a much more economical route than ~$200 for the foredom.

Since switching I haven't had the bog down problems that the dremel had, and I can also run 1/4" shank carbide burrs, and larger diameter cut off wheels.

I've never missed dremel, and find the more compact foredom handpiece to be more comfortable to use. I use a variac to vary the speed of the motor.

GROOVY
12-31-2003, 12:17 AM
Kevin

GROOVY
12-31-2003, 12:17 AM
Kevin

GROOVY
12-31-2003, 12:17 AM
Kevin

GROOVY
12-31-2003, 12:23 AM
Kevin I have a knock-off brand dremel type tool that was a gift, underpowered wont hold a charge pos... I have been considering a dremel with the flexshaft.. I have found that the body of the tool prevents me from getting a good angle while trying to use a cut-off disk to cut some 16ga brads that came through the inside of the cabinet that I am working on.. I vote for the 120V with the flexible shaft !

GROOVY
12-31-2003, 12:23 AM
Kevin I have a knock-off brand dremel type tool that was a gift, underpowered wont hold a charge pos... I have been considering a dremel with the flexshaft.. I have found that the body of the tool prevents me from getting a good angle while trying to use a cut-off disk to cut some 16ga brads that came through the inside of the cabinet that I am working on.. I vote for the 120V with the flexible shaft !

GROOVY
12-31-2003, 12:23 AM
Kevin I have a knock-off brand dremel type tool that was a gift, underpowered wont hold a charge pos... I have been considering a dremel with the flexshaft.. I have found that the body of the tool prevents me from getting a good angle while trying to use a cut-off disk to cut some 16ga brads that came through the inside of the cabinet that I am working on.. I vote for the 120V with the flexible shaft !