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skuthorp
01-17-2015, 07:54 PM
I heard a lecture on radio by Linda Hempel today and as I actually take less photo's with a digital camera than I did with a my succession of film SLR's.
Research says that the act of taking a photo reduces the actual memory of the object or place.
It's an interesting read for other reasons.
http://zscalarts.files.wordpress.com/2013/12/point-and-shoot-memories-the-influence-of-taking-photos-on-memory-for-a-museum-tour-by-linda-a-henkel.pdf

Donn
01-17-2015, 07:59 PM
Almost every aspect of computer use involves the 'outsourcing of memory.'

That's why it's so important to master the art of recovery of memories.

It's not what you know, it's what you know how to find.

skuthorp
01-17-2015, 08:03 PM
Almost every aspect of computer use involves the 'outsourcing of memory.'

That's why it's so important to master the art of recovery of memories.

It's not what you know, it's what you know how to find.
:DBY:D Anne is constantly amazed at how I know where everything is in our very large shed/shop/studio. So am I often enough!

Donn
01-17-2015, 08:06 PM
Google for the brain!

Paul Pless
01-17-2015, 08:06 PM
:DBY:D Anne is constantly amazed at knew I know where everything is in our very large shed/shop/studio. So am I often enough!

English as a first language? ;)

Donn
01-17-2015, 08:08 PM
English as a first language? ;)

Is it Strine?

skuthorp
01-17-2015, 08:11 PM
My typing is not what it never was……………………...

elf
01-17-2015, 08:26 PM
Well, it really depends on what kind of attention one pays when making the photograph.

In reality I find that when I go out to take photographs I can only attend to doing that. And inevitably my recollection of things going on when I was concentrating on taking a photograph is non-existent, since I didn't see them.

But I assure you, having spent the last three weeks sorting all my digital files in chronological folders, I can tell you a huge amount about the moment when any image was made - the weather, the physical place, whether I was in need of a toilet, the kind of effort it cost to be where the image was.

I have one image of the ocean rising up off a boulder which evokes the memory of a memorial service for an old friend every time I look at it. "Oh, that was the day we had the meeting for David".

I'm not at all certain I'm unique in that type of memory. Throw-back Thursday on FB reveals that many others experience major recollections from photos of things they were doing 40/50 years ago.

Memory is not necessarily a yesterday thing. It's also a last year, 20 years ago, childhood thing as well.

BrianW
01-18-2015, 06:20 AM
Well the title of the study was...

"Point-and-Shoot Memories: The Influence of Taking Photos on Memory for a Museum Tour"

...and I mostly use a DSLR, not a P&S camera.

So I don't think it applies to me.


















:D

skuthorp
01-18-2015, 03:23 PM
I volunteer part time in a tourist site, some visitors view the whole place through their ipad or phone camera, and never look about at the environment, the sea and the sky. They sometimes fall because they are not looking where they are going.

Phil Y
01-18-2015, 03:49 PM
I'm always somewhat surprised at the mums, and sometimes dads, who seem to observe their children's lives through a digital screen. Me, I'd rather be there.

elf
01-18-2015, 04:28 PM
They sometimes fall because they are not looking where they are going.
I did a job on my knee once the same way, only with my Canon up at my face!