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J.Madison
01-09-2015, 06:34 AM
Dear Woodenboat Editors,
I have finally found my way to a bookstore that still had the 2015 Small Boats issue on the shelves. This is always my favorite read of the year, and a little Christmas present to myself. But as I flipped through it this year, I started to get a little bit of an excluded feeling.

It is the small boats issue, produced by WoodenBoat, but there isn’t a single wooden lapstrake boat in the whole list! Am I the only one immediately thinks cedar lapstrake when small wooden boats are mentioned? There is one carvel boat in the list, the lovely double ender- but its 75 years old, and explicitly forbidden to be built. Is this what old men feel like when they realize that the world has passed them by and no one is interested in the things they spent a lifetime working towards?

The beginning of the mag has a writeup on the various construction methods written by someone who by their own admission has never built a traditional boat. They do a thorough job of making it seem complicated, antiquated, and not for the home builder. The stark absence of any wooden lapstrake boat and a not-for-you-to-build carvel from another era certainly reinforces the notion. (I concede that there is one reader-built wood lapstrake boat in the back.)

I am not an old man yet, only 25, but I am a home builder who builds almost entirely in traditional methods. I do not consider myself to be particularly talented, or old fashioned, or unopen to new ideas. I just love working with real wood and building wooden boats in carvel or lapstrake. It is not any more expensive (often a lot cheaper!) or much more difficult than ply and epoxy. I firmly believe that any dedicated new builder could easily learn these techniques and share in the profound satisfaction they bring. If WoodenBoat magazine is not encouraging them, who will? If I can’t come to you for my wood boat fix, where can I go?

It’s not that there is anything wrong with any of the boats in the issue. They are all great designs and look like lots of fun! I am just discouraged by the overall message that if you are going to build it yourself, all the parts can be found at the big box store or online. Better yet, just order a CNC kit and you won’t have to even create the shape! Leave it to the museums and instructors to build with timber; it’s too complicated for you.

WoodenBoat magazine gave me my start in this hobby, and books you published gave me the knowledge to succeed, greatly enriching my life. Limiting readers to modern methods is doing them a disservice. Epoxy boats are great, I just hope you don’t change to be exclusively the PlyWoodenboat magazine!

Here's to next year,
Jonathan Madison

p.s. If you have run out of wooden boats to feature- I have a barnful!

James McMullen
01-09-2015, 09:30 AM
I noticed that too, Jonathon. And the "you can look but you're not allowed to touch" aspect of that carvel dbl-ender kinda rubs me the wrong way just on principle.

There's certainly a place for the simplified types of boats and boatbuilding, but it seems all too often that people are intimidated from even trying something more sophisticated, which is sad. And it's not that I've got anything against kits and stuff. Depending on your goals, that can be a great way to get a boat if you have limited time or experience to start with. But there's a profound sense of satisfaction to be had from doing the whole thing yourself that you miss out on when taking the easier road.

Capt Zatarra
01-09-2015, 03:07 PM
I too, share your concerns. And I wonder if this current trend is not a product of the marketing of the kit boat industry? In order to increase the sale of kit boats, vendors promote the idea that traditional built boats (like the beloved lapstrake) are 1.too difficult for the average hobby builder. 2.requires specialized tools. And 3.too time consuming to build, (even if you did have the specialized tools). Whether or not there is any truth to these three ad campaign bullet points, they are exaggerated to the point of becoming a "profound truth". A "profound truth" is a concept that when an idea is repeated enough times, that it is execepted as fact. Number 4 on the list will be that the skills and knowlage required to build a boat, such as a copper riveted lapstrake, is a lost art! This will be added in time, after the first three are firmly intrenched in the publics conscious mind. It is not a far stretch then that a magazine editor would espouse these ideas and promote the concepts to the magazines patrons. To see the proof of this look at the evolution of fiberglass boat magazine advertisements. In their earliest appearances, they claim to have only one advantage over wooden boats, cost! They are faster to build, and do not require as many skilled workers, thereby placing them within reach of the middle class consumer. Over time the adverts evolve to apeal to a broader market. Because the manufacturers and sales department want to intice consumers from the more affluent wooden boat market to look at their product. They must create reasons for this new consumer to even concider their products. And touting cheap production cost at the cost of beauty, quality, craftsmanship, and comfort, will not work for a product that is at it's heart a luxury item for most consumers. So the spin begins. And advertising companies start promoting opinion as fact and outright lies as opinion. And eventually they become "profound truths" like 1. Wooden sailboats are cost more to maintain then fiberglass boats. 2. If you want to sail, buy a fiberglass boat, if you want to sand, buy a wooden boat. 3. Wooden boats are slow, fiberglass boats are fast. And my favorite one that I heard alot was 4. I would love to own a wooden boat like yours, but, I just don't have all the specialized skills to necessary to keep one afloat. These four "reasons" are firmly inbreed in the consumers mind. When I bought my wooden sailboat I was prepared to deal with all these "truths" and make the nessarcery sacrifices to own a beautiful and comfortable sailboat. Only after living with a wooden sailboat for many years did I learn how these so called truths were all misconception and lies.

The amazing thing to me is how many non boat owning people tried so hard to convince me that these ideas were in fact reality, once they learned I owned a woody. Despite the fact that I owned several wooden boat from six feet to fifty-six feet and had learned what I knew from my own experience, some people got quite heated and upset when I would not agree with them. (usually fiberglass boat owners).

How do we keep the traditional small wooden lapstrake and carvel boats from suffering the same fate as their larger brethren? I wish I had a good answer, but I don't. I think that if we borrow from another source the idea of letting our light shine and not hide it under a bushel basket, we can slow down the spread of the darkness of plywood boats from over taking our world.

Capt. Zatarra

Eric Hvalsoe
01-09-2015, 04:10 PM
Jonathan,
I love your steadfastness. Keep it up. I was not aware - the situation you describe in the last issue is disappointing. To be honest I did not take a good look at this one.

Am I surprised? Maybe not. Looking at it from WB's perspective, the concept of the small boats issue or at least what is suggested in my mind, is that these are a variety of boats, either plans or finished products that have achieved some level of visibility or success. 'Availability', to use another word. How many traditional lapstrake models fit that description in the year 2015? I bet more suggestions would be welcome. I assume the magazine is looking for these ideas. In my case several years ago, I personally approached one of the editors. If you want to see more traditional products, the magazine probably needs to see more proposals for that edition, prevailing trends be damned.

I don't know, maybe there is an unnecessary bias. In that case admonish away. You are an outstanding spokesman for traditional construction. Maybe you ought to propose and write an article - have you already?
Eric

Freyr
01-09-2015, 07:56 PM
I flipped through it at the newsstand but did not buy, for this very reason. Not much looked particularly interesting.

swoody126
01-10-2015, 09:27 AM
don't have a copy of this year's issue, so can't comment on the content, you are referring to

HOWEVER, may i share an experience...

while attending the PlyWooden Boat Festival, in Port Aransas this past fall, i watched the FAMILY BOAT BUILDING event with great interest, just to see if IT could really be done

the staff of FARLEY BOAT SHOP did a masterful job of engineering the success of the event and the participants went away with A WOODEN BOAT

on that Sunday afternoon, it didn't matter what method/materials THE BOAT evolved from

one family, which was represented by 4 generations, began this weekend event with NO EXPERIENCE and left with a WOODEN BOAT, they had assembled themselves

i do not mean to belittle your feelings, in the OP, butt... isn't it just as, if not more important to get folks into the fold and then cultivate their tastes?

the fear of failure is easily overcome when events like i witnessed end up with 4 generations of one family taking a ride in a WOODEN BOAT of their own making

btw, one of the younger(3rd generation) members of that family left THE FESTIVAL with a full set of plans, he had purchased with his own money, for the families first project

YES, there is way more to WOODEN BOATS than just a PLYWOODEN ROW BOAT, butt...

we all had to learn how to crawl 1st and that began with a DESIRE to be across the room

just this old man's 2 worth, on this Saturday morning

sw

rbgarr
01-10-2015, 10:32 AM
One of the things the publishers at WB have to address is the demographics of their audience and subscription base. In general, I think it tends toward the older-white-men side, and to appeal to a younger audience it makes sense to promote kit boats, more accessible to young family guys and gals with limited free time, space and tools to build. Then maybe they'll grow up to be the older-white-men base that seems to be the most loyal audience.

sailnstink
01-10-2015, 10:34 AM
I agree. Plywood is the gateway drug for wooden boat building. How badly the addiction takes from there is a personal thing. While most here buy a copy, I'd guess most here are familiar with what shows up in that issue. Guessing the market is the haven't yet started crowd, converting them to boat builders of any aptitude is the idea.

Brian Palmer
01-10-2015, 11:08 AM
One of the things the publishers at WB have to address is the demographics of their audience and subscription base. In general, I think it tends toward the older-white-men side, and to appeal to a younger audience it makes sense to promote kit boats, more accessible to young family guys and gals with limited free time, space and tools to build. Then maybe they'll grow up to be the older-white-men base that seems to be the most loyal audience.

Well, yes, I generally agree except I don't expect too many of those who are currently "young family gals" to grow up to be the "older-white-men base" needed by the magazine. :) A little more diversity all around would help the field of boat building and the sport/hobby of boating a lot.

Brian

rbgarr
01-10-2015, 11:34 AM
http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?186759-Where-are-the-women

Yeadon
01-10-2015, 11:49 AM
You are an outstanding spokesman for traditional construction. Maybe you ought to propose and write an article - have you already?
Eric

This is your answer.

J.Madison
01-10-2015, 12:31 PM
Plywood as a gateway drug... yes its true. That was the way I built my first wooden boat, glued lap. Its also great for those who aren't beginners in many cases, I just don't want the real thing to be forgotten.

It seems the balancing act between being accessible to a wide and new base, and being true to the craft has swung a bit too far towards the ply end of the spectrum.

As far as writing articles... maybe in a few years when I've completed a couple more trad boats. Wouldn't want to overstep my credibility!

Thanks for all the input.

Falcon1
01-10-2015, 05:20 PM
Just got my issue last week, and I, too wish there were more trad., plank-on-frame boats in there. I'm chiming in because I'm on the horns of a dilemma as far as my next build goes. I've just finished a glued-lap Whilly Boat, and I had a great time building it. I'm a beginning woodworker.

For my next boat, I want to build with as little goop and plywood as possible. Aside from learning the skills needed for a cedar plank on sawn frame dinghy, I was horrified at the amount of plastic cups, epoxy coated rags, plywood scraps, etc. that I sent to the land-fill. I'd like to make a boat that, at the end of its life on the water, can just go back to the earth. My dilemma is this, next boat, like current boat will be trailer sailed. Can a traditional boat do this? I would love to build Atkins' "Nina" design, but woory that it will always leak if trailer-sailed.

On the other end of the spectrum, (and please forgive the thread drift!) I could build another glued-lap boat, but this time with lots of flotation and camp-cruising capability. Vivier's "Ilur" and Welsford's "Navigator" and Lillistone's "Phoenix III" being good examples.

Clone myself, rob a bank, and get to work on two boats?

Mike

hokiefan
01-10-2015, 07:23 PM
I remember when I started reading WoodenBoat, it was the summer of 1981 at my in-laws-to-be house. The article that hooked me was Sam Manning's series of drawings that illustrated how a traditional wooden boat was built. The boat was Crocker's Sallee Rover, and the drawings created the proverbial Ah Ha moment for me. I started to get it. That said, while I understood how it was done, carvel construction still seemed like a mysterious art, unachievable to the mere mortal. Traditional lapstrake was even more mysterious. The first book I bought on boatbuilding was John Gardner's More Building Classic Small Craft. While the boats in the book were relatively simple designs, the traditional methods didn't seem doable to me at the time.

For years when I looked at plans I gravitated towards plywood designs, and sharpies in particular. But I kept hanging out here, reading different books, and learning. I've built a few simple small boats in the last 6-7 years, the designs chosen as much for the available time and space as my perception of my abilities. When I'm reading now I find I'm most interested in the traditional builds, the "real" boats. Jim Ledger's Brewer Catboat has been incredibly educational to me. He hasn't done anything I didn't conceptually know how to do, but to see it really done and so well illustrated has made it feel possible. I still don't see that I have the patience he has to achieve the fits he does, but that is a different story.

All that said, I envision the significant boat I want to build will be a glue-lap plywood boat. Primarily because it will live on a trailer, one of the realities I see in this world.

Cheers,

Bobby

James McMullen
01-10-2015, 07:49 PM
Oh, don't worry Bobby. Glued-lap is actually superior in some aspects, you know, particularly in strength-to-weight issues, as well as tolerating lesser crafstmanship. I actually don't entirely agree with Zatarra up there, you know. I don't think it does anyone any favors to not acknowledge that traditional methods are in many cases more difficult and require better craftsmanship, attention to detail and care. I think it's better to be up front about that, and then make the argument for why it's worth it anyways.

But back to glued-lap: even though I know of no form of woodworking under the sun that is more engrossing, sophisticated and joy-inducing than traditional, copper-fastened lapstrake out of real wood, there are some specific, function-related reasons why my own primary boat is epoxy-glued lapstrake instead, and it's not because I don't have the resources, time or skills to have built her trad. But if I were having her as much or more for the building than for the using, you bet I'd be trad. lap, all the way.

Let's be realistic here folks. Jonathan has some very good points. But on the other hand, every boat is a compromise, and we ought to go into it with clear eyes, and not just romantic notions. Building a trad. boat requires a greater commitment. Let's not sweep that under the rug.

Capt Zatarra
01-10-2015, 10:33 PM
Oh, don't worry Bobby. Glued-lap is actually superior in some aspects, you know, particularly in strength-to-weight issues, as well as tolerating lesser crafstmanship. I actually don't entirely agree with Zatarra up there, you know. I don't think it does anyone any favors to not acknowledge that traditional methods are in many cases more difficult and require better craftsmanship, attention to detail and care. I think it's better to be up front about that, and then make the argument for why it's worth it anyways.

But back to glued-lap: even though I know of no form of woodworking under the sun that is more engrossing, sophisticated and joy-inducing than traditional, copper-fastened lapstrake out of real wood, there are some specific, function-related reasons why my own primary boat is epoxy-glued lapstrake instead, and it's not because I don't have the resources, time or skills to have built her trad. But if I were having her as much or more for the building than for the using, you bet I'd be trad. lap, all the way.

Let's be realistic here folks. Jonathan has some very good points. But on the other hand, every boat is a compromise, and we ought to go into it with clear eyes, and not just romantic notions. Building a trad. boat requires a greater commitment. Let's not sweep that under the rug.

My intention was not to imply that the skills needed to do traditional boat building should be down played, but that the plywood boat marketing folks are exaggerating these same skills to be unattainable to the average weekend boat builder. I would propose that what is needed is more understanding that all the woodworking skills that are required to build a traditional wooden boat are within the reach of the average weekend builder.(with time and practice) And further that it can be done with a limited number of tools. I think that a new proslatite to the church of the wooden vessel is intimidated by all the tools that the long time woodworker has acquired. And that feeling of intimidation is manipulated for the same reason by the market forces.

I think that the message that is needed is, for those who appreciate the fine craftsmanship and beauty that is imbodied by the traditional wooden boat, that the payment of time and the added difficulty of skills that need to be aquired and honed, are well worth the price.

Conversely there is a place for the plywood boat, the family build a boat day, the introduction of the skills to start a new hobby, the boy scout projects, all these and more are good examples of where the plywood boat fits in. But what the OP was decrying (I think) was that these plywood boats are replacing the traditionally built boats as the pentacle of the boatbuilders achievements, I see it as a dumbing down of our art form by market forces. I don't think that it is intentional of the magazine to do this, but it is the results non the less.
Capt. Z.

James McMullen
01-10-2015, 11:24 PM
You got it, Captain Z. We don't really disagree.

BBSebens
01-11-2015, 02:12 AM
Can a traditional boat do this? I would love to build Atkins' "Nina" design, but woory that it will always leak if trailer-sailed.




Traditional lapstrake construction is specifically for boats that will be in and out of the water. If you really have concerns about that, ask Eric Hvalsoe about Bandwagon, or Tim Yeadon about Big Food. Both trad lap sail and oar boats, which have each survived many launch/retrievals, and many more miles both over asphalt and water.

J.Madison
01-11-2015, 04:43 AM
Traditional methods certainly require better fits, and have less tolerance for big mistakes than epoxy methods. No doubt. There are many other advantages and disadvatages to each method, which can be discussed if people are interested. I just want to encourage those who would like to have a trad lap or carvel boat that it is certainly within their reach. Especially if you've done a glued lap boat already, then you understand all the rolling bevels, gains, spiling, and other parts that tend to scare people. There is no one task that is particularly difficult, it is just a long series of tasks that can be learned one at a time as you go.

Am I right that even people who prefer the epoxy methods might enjoy reading about and seeing traditional builds in the magazine?

Is this the AHA! moment? This is one of the ones that made things click for me!
http://cdn.woodenboatstore.com/images/uploads/Structure_Wooden_Boat_Poster_710008P.jpg

Traditional building is romantic, and sometimes a bit fanciful. But if we wanted barebones practicality we'd buy fiberglass. Most of us are here just for fun. Its all about what makes our lives feel more enriched and happy, to that end a little romance is entirely the point.

Falcon: here in the PNW cedar lap works pretty well as a trailered boat. The humidity never gets so low that shrinkage is much of an issue. (Thin lapstrake planks don't shrink much anyway, think about Herreshoff's yacht tenders- all cedar lapstrake, and they were intended to be out of the water on davits.) I know some people shape a small hollow along the lap and put a little bead of goop on when hanging the plank when it is to be trailered. Another option is to build it and then rake out a small groove along the outside of the lap to receive some boatlife caulk or something similar. (Not epoxy!) I've used this last method successfully.

The crossplanked bottom of Nina might pose more of a problem. If you want to stick with real wood, put a layer of cedar 1/2 the final thickness on just as in cross planking. Then do a second layer skewed 45 degrees or so and epoxy it all together. Harry Brian does this I believe. If that much epoxy isn't your thing, I've had success with putting a layer of canvas over the cross planking and painting it heavily. Then do a second layer of cross planking and clinch nail it all together. The total bottom needs to be a bit thicker than original for strength with this method.

A ply bottom and cedar lapstrake sides is not unreasonable. On the cross planked boat I just finished, I did it completely traditional just as Atkin specified. It sat all summer in the dry heat of the barn and when I launched it didn't leak a drop. Maybe over the years it will start to leak a bit upon launching, but one could always re-firm up the caulking and seam compound in 5 years.

Lewisboater
01-11-2015, 07:59 AM
I notice that all the comments are from folks who are within an 8 hour drive from a saltwater coast... Plywood works a lot better in the other 4/5ths of the country... just sayin'

jsjpd1
01-11-2015, 02:34 PM
No one is saying that plywood doesn't make good boats. But if only plywood boats and out of reach antiques are featured in the small boat arena then we've lost something.

Howard Rice
01-11-2015, 03:43 PM
Perhaps just a sign of the times, sad in my book................on the other side of the flipped coin I figure if ol Nat would have had access to plywood and epoxy then we might be looking at a whole different take on the term traditional.

I spend most of my time living on one of the last very traditional (culturally speaking) islands in the world, Pohnpei. In my capacity here I work with anthropologists who often make silly disparaging comments about current culture. For example two nights ago I attended a traditional ceremony (Kapasmwar) and sign of the times was written all over it. Hip hop t shirts, LA Lakers shirts and grass skirts as sakau was pounded..............sign of the times...............The Gods Must Be Crazy.

I am fortunate to travel to the US in summers to teach plywood boat building classes (read passion) and the feeling builders have of a cmc cut puzzle put together is great however when I put a plane in their hands and teach them to plane a bevel they really light up usually stating "I feel like a craftsman", same with the one small job we sometimes steam.

I applaud the traditional builders amongst us and although not having access to the current small boat issue I find what I read here sad as stated. Keep at it traditional builders, don't blink or lose your way. If we lose the artifacts in this life and are left with only the art (pictures in books) then another big chunk of real is gone from our lives already under assault from big box everything. Have to close now as its time to borrow a morning flaming coconut husk to start the cooking fire, very civilized I'd say.

hokiefan
01-11-2015, 03:56 PM
...

Is this the AHA! moment? This is one of the ones that made things click for me!
http://cdn.woodenboatstore.com/images/uploads/Structure_Wooden_Boat_Poster_710008P.jpg

...

Yup, that's the one.

Dave Lesser
01-11-2015, 05:16 PM
. . . although not having access to the current small boat issue . . .

They just released the digital version for download: www.woodenboatstore.com/product/specialty-issue-small-boats-2015-DIGITAL (http://www.woodenboatstore.com/product/specialty-issue-small-boats-2015-DIGITAL)

Falcon1
01-11-2015, 07:24 PM
Thanks for the helpful info, Jonathan. I think I'll order the plans for Nina, just to have in hand and start the daydreaming, night-scheming process.

Cheers!

Mike

Pericles
01-19-2015, 05:25 PM
Jonathan Madison,

Ply is used because lumber ain't what it usta be. The first Simmons Sea Skiffs were built of juniper (Atlantic cedar) on mahogany framing, but in the mid-1950's Simmons switched his planking material to Douglas-fir plywood, due to the increasing scarcity of boat-quality juniper and because he considered the plywood stronger. Later still, Simmons began planking the bottoms and decks with Douglas-fir MDO plywood for increased abrasion resistance. Transoms and motorwells were always built of solid mahogany. framing and longitudinal members were fastened with screws and bolts, and planking was held together by closely spaced bronze ring nails. Simmons relied on a dead fit between joints to keep water out and used no caulking compounds or glue. Another product that Simmons never put into use was fiberglass. He once joked, "Enough people don't like fiberglass to keep me in business." He built 1000 boats.

The links will give you the background.


http://www.oldwharf.com/ow_simmons.html (http://www.oldwharf.com/ow_simmons.html)


http://www.oldwharf.com/ow_sss_underconstruction.html (http://www.oldwharf.com/ow_sss_underconstruction.html)


http://www.oldwharf.com/ow_sss_photos1.html (http://www.oldwharf.com/ow_sss_photos1.html)


http://www.simmonsseaskiff.com/ (http://www.simmonsseaskiff.com/)


http://www.simmonsseaskiff.com/SSS%20history/DaveCarnell.htm (http://www.simmonsseaskiff.com/SSS%20history/DaveCarnell.htm)


http://www.capefearmuseum.com/store-simmons-boat-plans/ (http://www.capefearmuseum.com/store-simmons-boat-plans/)


http://www.simmonsseaskiff.com/SSS%20history/index.htm

WI-Tom
01-19-2015, 08:06 PM
As a sometime writer for Small Boats, maybe my perspective is of interest here. Full disclosure: I've never built in trad carvel or trad lapstrake--or for that matter, in glued ply lapstrake (yet). I'm finishing a semi-trad strip planked boat now (thick strips, edge glued and nailed, with no structural need for glassing). But I'd be very happy to write about traditional builds for Small Boats. The problem is, I don't know of any traditional builds or boats available for writers to sail and review.

So I think it's important to think carefully about why Small Boats isn't featuring a lot of trad builds. Possibilities:

1. The folks at WB and Small Boats don't care about trad boat building anymore (unlikely)

2. The mags are a reflection of the boatbuilding culture as well as an encourager of it, and so content reflects not only what the writers and editors think is important, but also must reflect what people are actually doing--and not many of us are building trad boats (very likely)

My conclusion is that people building trad boats should submit reviews and articles so that the trad faction is not ignored--as many posters have already noted, it's sad to see the loss of knowledge and skill that could be preserved if enough practitioners are found to keep it alive. Or, if you don't want to write an article, contact the folks at Small Boats or WoodenBoat, or a friendly freelance writer, and suggest that a review of your trad boat be included in an upcoming issue.

I think the WB and Small Boats people would be very happy indeed to feature more traditional builds--but first, people have to actually build the builds.

Tom

Binnacle Bat
01-19-2015, 11:03 PM
First we must remember that Small Boats is primarily a news-stand outreach thing to folks who might want to step up from wherever. I grew up with wood boats, the plywood Turnabouts and Sailfish at Summer camp, the Barnegat Bay Sneak-box my father was given on his 12th birthday, The George's Bank schooner and Alden yawl I got my sea legs on.

Damn, it was fun.

Then life intervened. I was not a member of the leisure class. Having fallen in love, I had to be a grown-up, get a job, live within our means etc.

Since then sailing has been a luxury. First a subscription to WB. That lead to a few Sika Challenge cups. A long stretch of pretending to be a responsible adult. On my 50th birthday my sister gave me a Snark. Then when the in-laws sold the camp I grabbed the Sunfish. When I wanted to step up from there a geriatric Thistle looked like fun. It was and is.

The focus of Small Boats is drawing in new people. The kind of folks that might have built a strip canoe or a stitch and glue kayak, and want to go further. If it is beneath you, step up to the next level. The archives and resources of our host have many options available.

The small boats issue will remain on my reading list for years to come, but in the end, my next boat will be my own design. Gentlemen, sharpen your pencils!

Allan

George Jung
02-15-2015, 05:41 PM
Good thread; I've been considering 'stepping up' from building stripper kayaks. Thanks for the references.

Canoeyawl
02-15-2015, 07:46 PM
A traditional lapstrake boat can be built using plywood planking with glued and riveted laps.
It makes a good boat.

Ben Fuller
02-15-2015, 07:59 PM
A traditional lapstrake boat can be built using plywood planking with glued and riveted laps.
It makes a good boat.

Absolutely right. The way to get around the biggest difficulty in trad building: sourcing materials and figuring out the materials that you need. A discussion that John Gardner and I used to have. There are instructions, courses, plans and how to books but very few that tell you how to figure out how many feet of xxx you need. Joe Liener, the gent that taught me and others about Delaware boats and melonseeds built his own ducker and melonseed traditionally out of plywood. He did get nice stuff, aircraft ply out of the Naval Aircraft Factory next door to the Naval Yard's small boat shop that he ran, and he did spec it a 16th thinner as it was heavier than cedar. The modified LFH "Green machine" John built at Mystic is plywood planked, all except the sheer strake so it is really hard to tell.