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Peter Malcolm Jardine
01-01-2015, 08:19 PM
Frederick Sewards recollection of the day.......



At noon, accompanying my father, I carried the broad parchment in a large
portfolio under my arm. We, threading our way through the throng in the vicinity
of the White House, went upstairs to the President's room, where Mr. Lincoln
speedily joined us. The broad sheet was spread open before him on the Cabinet
table. Mr. Lincoln dipped his pen in the ink, and then, holding it a moment
above the sheet, seemed to hesitate. Looking around, he said:

"I never in my life felt more certain that I was doing right, than I do in signing this
paper. But I have been receiving calls and shaking hands since nine o'clock this
morning, till my arm is stiff and numb. Now this signature is one that will be
closely examined, and if they find my hand trembled they will say 'he had some
compunctions.' But anyway, it is going to be done."

So saying, he slowly and carefully wrote his name at the bottom of the proclamation. The signature
proved to be unusually clear, bold, and firm, even for him, and a laugh followed
at his apprehension. My father, after appending his own name, and causing the
great seal to be affixed, had the important document placed among the archives.
Copies were at once given to the press.

Gerarddm
01-01-2015, 09:01 PM
The pivot point of the war. With it, Britain would no longer dally with idea of recognizing the Confederacy. Without foreign support, they were ( thankfully ) doomed.

leikec
01-01-2015, 09:04 PM
There's a reason Abe is #1.

Jeff C

CWSmith
01-01-2015, 09:06 PM
Political courage and leadership. We see it every day...

S.V. Airlie
01-01-2015, 09:07 PM
Political courage and leadership. We see it every day...We do?

CWSmith
01-01-2015, 09:07 PM
we do?

sarcasm

Tom Montgomery
01-01-2015, 09:18 PM
Political courage and leadership.
Sort of... it only freed Confederate slaves.

Slaves in Maryland, Kentucky, Missouri and Delaware were not freed by the Emancipation Proclamation.

Dannybb55
01-02-2015, 07:36 AM
Neither were they in New Mexico and Arizona. The Indian slaves in Taos were not freed until the 20th century. According to records at the Martines Hacienda museum.

Keith Wilson
01-02-2015, 10:07 AM
Lincoln also managed to get the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery altogether through Congress two years later.


The Emancipation Proclamation
January 1, 1863

By the President of the United States of America:

A Proclamation.

Whereas, on the twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, a proclamation was issued by the President of the United States, containing, among other things, the following, to wit:

"That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; and the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons, and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them, in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom.

"That the Executive will, on the first day of January aforesaid, by proclamation, designate the States and parts of States, if any, in which the people thereof, respectively, shall then be in rebellion against the United States; and the fact that any State, or the people thereof, shall on that day be, in good faith, represented in the Congress of the United States by members chosen thereto at elections wherein a majority of the qualified voters of such State shall have participated, shall, in the absence of strong countervailing testimony, be deemed conclusive evidence that such State, and the people thereof, are not then in rebellion against the United States."

Now, therefore I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, by virtue of the power in me vested as Commander-in-Chief, of the Army and Navy of the United States in time of actual armed rebellion against the authority and government of the United States, and as a fit and necessary war measure for suppressing said rebellion, do, on this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and in accordance with my purpose so to do publicly proclaimed for the full period of one hundred days, from the day first above mentioned, order and designate as the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit:
Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, (except the Parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James Ascension, Assumption, Terrebonne, Lafourche, St. Mary, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the City of New Orleans) Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia, (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Ann, and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth[)], and which excepted parts, are for the present, left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued.

And by virtue of the power, and for the purpose aforesaid, I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States, and parts of States, are, and henceforward shall be free; and that the Executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authorities thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons.

And I hereby enjoin upon the people so declared to be free to abstain from all violence, unless in necessary self-defence; and I recommend to them that, in all cases when allowed, they labor faithfully for reasonable wages.

And I further declare and make known, that such persons of suitable condition, will be received into the armed service of the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service.

And upon this act, sincerely believed to be an act of justice, warranted by the Constitution, upon military necessity, I invoke the considerate judgment of mankind, and the gracious favor of Almighty God.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington, this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the eighty-seventh.

By the President: ABRAHAM LINCOLN
WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.