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kbowen
12-25-2014, 09:29 AM
In the current WB, the article about Nigel Irens uses the term RIB, which appears to be an acronym for some kind of powerboat. Can someone define for me?

Ken

David G
12-25-2014, 10:27 AM
Have you ever seen a Zodiac? That's one brand of RIB. Rigid Inflatable Boat --

https://s.yimg.com/fz/api/res/1.2/hxALwhq6KHl0BfiC1gLFrg--/YXBwaWQ9c3JjaGRkO2g9NTAwO3E9OTU7dz03NTA-/http://www.iboats.com/sites/Zodiac/site_page_9017/images/l_medline-sundream4.jpg

Hwyl
12-25-2014, 10:37 AM
Yep, hard bottom, inflatable sides, invented by a bunch of kids at Atlantic College.

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-south-east-wales-13377377

capefox
12-26-2014, 01:29 PM
The tubes on some RIBs see filled with closed cell foam.

Dan Payne
12-27-2014, 03:20 PM
I had a RIB. I found the Maintainence of the inflatable material a pain in the a$$

rbgarr
12-27-2014, 04:59 PM
Here's an earlier RIB-related thread: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?146544-12-quot-anti-RIB-quot-pram-tender-sail-outboard-by-Doug-Hylan

floatingkiwi
01-17-2015, 08:57 PM
I had a RIB. I found the Maintainence of the inflatable material a pain in the a$$

What maintenance?

floatingkiwi
01-17-2015, 08:58 PM
The tubes on some RIBs see filled with closed cell foam.

Really? I havent seen one. What would ne the purpose of doing such a thing other than adding weight.

Todd Bradshaw
01-17-2015, 11:27 PM
A "normal" inflatable motorboat like an Avon Rover has a fabric, V-shaped bottom. Under the floorboards, there is a long skinny air tube running down the middle from bow to transom that forces the bottom into its V-shape. On a RIB, the fabric bottom and inner tube have been replaced with a V-shaped, fiberglass or aluminum bottom. It holds its shape better than the cloth bottom, offering better performance and more durability, though it obviously won't roll up into a small package because of this one-piece, rigid bottom structure. I've also never seen a foam-filled inflatable and can't see why you would need it. Once properly inflated the side tubes on these boats are about as stiff as a basketball.

Paul G.
01-18-2015, 04:34 AM
Unless you intend to row a lot or sail your tender, RIB's and their ilk are superior to hard dinghies in just about every important way. They are safer, easier to transfer in and out of, you can load them to ridiculous levels, they plane well, have a soft ride. etc etc etc. BUT they dont look as good and deck storage can be a pain!

floatingkiwi
01-18-2015, 12:11 PM
Unless you intend to row a lot or sail your tender, RIB's and their ilk are superior to hard dinghies in just about every important way. They are safer, easier to transfer in and out of, you can load them to ridiculous levels, they plane well, have a soft ride. etc etc etc. BUT they dont look as good and deck storage can be a pain!

I have owned several of them. In fact all my fishing in New Zealand is done with RIB. On an RIB people can sit on the comfortable pontoons making much extra room in the boat for fish. And gear. Try sitting on the gunwale of a dinghy. Ouch and capsize.
When I was gettin the hang of handling the first inflatable I had, 10 foot with a 15 hp OMC , solid f'glass hull with a false floor AquaPro, Ill never forget the look on my mate Mikes,(RIP Mikey),face as , going with the wind at full speeeeeed and thinking this thing is supposed to handle this,ploughing into the trough of a rogue wave setup, the ocean parted and there was a gigantic green flower that opened before us as the boat and motor made the effort to drive itself, and us, into her depths, then it collapsed in on us and Mike disappeared briefly before we came to a dead stop, the boat full to overflowing with water. As Mike turned to abuse me after realizing he was quite wet and what the hell was I doing, he reacted to whatever look on my face I must have had and we laughed and laughed so hard it took us a good ten minutes to bail the water out. I never once felt unsafe during that episode. All our important gear was in sealed 5 gallon paint drums and off we went. Had some good times in that boat.

Mad Scientist
01-19-2015, 07:52 PM
RIBs will take a lot, but they all have a breaking point. A few year ago, a Canadian Navy RIB met with some sort of misfortune and got shipped back to Halifax on a flatbed container. I remember seeing it (or most of it) sitting on its container, looking considerably less Rigid than it was supposed to. The crew wore PFDs and hard hats, IIRC.

Tom

John B
01-19-2015, 08:04 PM
RIB's are great utility barges/ tenders, don't carve up your paint , relatively light weight, easy to get on board via halyard because they don't carve up your paint, pigs to row and totally outboard dependent .

Breakaway
01-19-2015, 08:31 PM
Really? I havent seen one. What would ne the purpose of doing such a thing other than adding weight.

Unlike an inflatable collar, a foam collar cannot be holed, requires little maintenance and provides almost every benefit of the the inflatable except for "self-fendering." Not quite as light, perhaps, but still lighter than a conventional boat.

It should be noted that in addition to the V-hull a RIB's collar also contributes to ride quality. It slows the boat down as it drops off a wave, reducing accelerations. ( slamming) and the collar attenuates much of the shudder, slam and vibration of running hard in a sea.

Kevin