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imported_Krueg
01-22-2001, 02:41 PM
Hello all. I am building one of the boat cradles advertised in WB for the newest addition to the family. My question is this: What type of products would be suitable for finishing the hull (nontoxic). I do not want to paint. Thanks in advance.

Eric

imported_Krueg
01-22-2001, 02:41 PM
Hello all. I am building one of the boat cradles advertised in WB for the newest addition to the family. My question is this: What type of products would be suitable for finishing the hull (nontoxic). I do not want to paint. Thanks in advance.

Eric

imported_Krueg
01-22-2001, 02:41 PM
Hello all. I am building one of the boat cradles advertised in WB for the newest addition to the family. My question is this: What type of products would be suitable for finishing the hull (nontoxic). I do not want to paint. Thanks in advance.

Eric

Tom Jackson
01-22-2001, 03:00 PM
You might want to consider shellac, which is a natural resin carried in alcohol. Once the alcohol evaporates, the finish is fine-looking--and it's even edible. The only disadvantage is that if you spill alcohol on it the finish comes off.

Tom Jackson
01-22-2001, 03:00 PM
You might want to consider shellac, which is a natural resin carried in alcohol. Once the alcohol evaporates, the finish is fine-looking--and it's even edible. The only disadvantage is that if you spill alcohol on it the finish comes off.

Tom Jackson
01-22-2001, 03:00 PM
You might want to consider shellac, which is a natural resin carried in alcohol. Once the alcohol evaporates, the finish is fine-looking--and it's even edible. The only disadvantage is that if you spill alcohol on it the finish comes off.

Ian McColgin
01-22-2001, 03:06 PM
I take it you're rejected toxic woods like mahogoney.

It's good for every wee babe to have a wee boat.

Ian McColgin
01-22-2001, 03:06 PM
I take it you're rejected toxic woods like mahogoney.

It's good for every wee babe to have a wee boat.

Ian McColgin
01-22-2001, 03:06 PM
I take it you're rejected toxic woods like mahogoney.

It's good for every wee babe to have a wee boat.

imported_Krueg
01-22-2001, 03:58 PM
As of yet I have not decided what type of wood to plank it with. I must admit I didn't even think of wood toxicity. It is to be copper riveted lapstrake (only three planks per side), cross-planked bottom. I've never built any thing like this, and since I'm an apartment dweller, I thought this might also be a warmup for the day I have room to build one a little bigger.

Maybe this is a good time to ask about the rivets. From what I've seen, the choices are to use common copper boat nails or rose headed boat nails. Pros, cons?

Any and all suggestions regarding finishes, wood types, and riveting would be greatly appreciated. Go easy on the rookie. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

[This message has been edited by EKrueger (edited 01-22-2001).]

imported_Krueg
01-22-2001, 03:58 PM
As of yet I have not decided what type of wood to plank it with. I must admit I didn't even think of wood toxicity. It is to be copper riveted lapstrake (only three planks per side), cross-planked bottom. I've never built any thing like this, and since I'm an apartment dweller, I thought this might also be a warmup for the day I have room to build one a little bigger.

Maybe this is a good time to ask about the rivets. From what I've seen, the choices are to use common copper boat nails or rose headed boat nails. Pros, cons?

Any and all suggestions regarding finishes, wood types, and riveting would be greatly appreciated. Go easy on the rookie. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

[This message has been edited by EKrueger (edited 01-22-2001).]

imported_Krueg
01-22-2001, 03:58 PM
As of yet I have not decided what type of wood to plank it with. I must admit I didn't even think of wood toxicity. It is to be copper riveted lapstrake (only three planks per side), cross-planked bottom. I've never built any thing like this, and since I'm an apartment dweller, I thought this might also be a warmup for the day I have room to build one a little bigger.

Maybe this is a good time to ask about the rivets. From what I've seen, the choices are to use common copper boat nails or rose headed boat nails. Pros, cons?

Any and all suggestions regarding finishes, wood types, and riveting would be greatly appreciated. Go easy on the rookie. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

[This message has been edited by EKrueger (edited 01-22-2001).]

John058
01-22-2001, 05:56 PM
...I'll weigh in on the recommendation to use shellac as well...you can get it ready mixed (Bullseye is sold in most home fix-it stores) but be sure to check the date on the can as it doesn't have an extremely long shelf life...you can also get it in flakes and dissolve in alcohol per directions...it is most non-toxic...be sure to apply several coats as the stains you use are not so kind to wee ones...it dries fast and if you bronze wool it between coats it'll gleam

John058
01-22-2001, 05:56 PM
...I'll weigh in on the recommendation to use shellac as well...you can get it ready mixed (Bullseye is sold in most home fix-it stores) but be sure to check the date on the can as it doesn't have an extremely long shelf life...you can also get it in flakes and dissolve in alcohol per directions...it is most non-toxic...be sure to apply several coats as the stains you use are not so kind to wee ones...it dries fast and if you bronze wool it between coats it'll gleam

John058
01-22-2001, 05:56 PM
...I'll weigh in on the recommendation to use shellac as well...you can get it ready mixed (Bullseye is sold in most home fix-it stores) but be sure to check the date on the can as it doesn't have an extremely long shelf life...you can also get it in flakes and dissolve in alcohol per directions...it is most non-toxic...be sure to apply several coats as the stains you use are not so kind to wee ones...it dries fast and if you bronze wool it between coats it'll gleam

T.KAMILA
01-22-2001, 06:50 PM
In woodturning we use Salad Bowel Finish to stay nontoxic. Try this site: http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/

Tom

T.KAMILA
01-22-2001, 06:50 PM
In woodturning we use Salad Bowel Finish to stay nontoxic. Try this site: http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/

Tom

T.KAMILA
01-22-2001, 06:50 PM
In woodturning we use Salad Bowel Finish to stay nontoxic. Try this site: http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/

Tom

G. Schollmeier
01-22-2001, 07:14 PM
Just plain vegetable oil. I have used it on many a child toy. Gary

G. Schollmeier
01-22-2001, 07:14 PM
Just plain vegetable oil. I have used it on many a child toy. Gary

G. Schollmeier
01-22-2001, 07:14 PM
Just plain vegetable oil. I have used it on many a child toy. Gary

imported_Krueg
01-23-2001, 08:39 AM
Thank you all for the ideas. The woodturning site seemed to have several products that would work. Does anybody know a reason why tung oil wouldn't be good?

imported_Krueg
01-23-2001, 08:39 AM
Thank you all for the ideas. The woodturning site seemed to have several products that would work. Does anybody know a reason why tung oil wouldn't be good?

imported_Krueg
01-23-2001, 08:39 AM
Thank you all for the ideas. The woodturning site seemed to have several products that would work. Does anybody know a reason why tung oil wouldn't be good?

thechemist
01-23-2001, 10:51 AM
With exposure to the ultraviolet of the sun it will yellow/darken with age, more than most varnishes. If you are not going to leave it unprotected a lot, that should not be a problem.

thechemist
01-23-2001, 10:51 AM
With exposure to the ultraviolet of the sun it will yellow/darken with age, more than most varnishes. If you are not going to leave it unprotected a lot, that should not be a problem.

thechemist
01-23-2001, 10:51 AM
With exposure to the ultraviolet of the sun it will yellow/darken with age, more than most varnishes. If you are not going to leave it unprotected a lot, that should not be a problem.

Alan D. Hyde
01-23-2001, 11:30 AM
I used 50/50 boiled linseed oil/turpentine on a black walnut cradle I built for my children in 1976.

No problems yet.

If you want more shine, you could wax it.

Alan

[This message has been edited by Alan D. Hyde (edited 01-23-2001).]

Alan D. Hyde
01-23-2001, 11:30 AM
I used 50/50 boiled linseed oil/turpentine on a black walnut cradle I built for my children in 1976.

No problems yet.

If you want more shine, you could wax it.

Alan

[This message has been edited by Alan D. Hyde (edited 01-23-2001).]

Alan D. Hyde
01-23-2001, 11:30 AM
I used 50/50 boiled linseed oil/turpentine on a black walnut cradle I built for my children in 1976.

No problems yet.

If you want more shine, you could wax it.

Alan

[This message has been edited by Alan D. Hyde (edited 01-23-2001).]

imported_Krueg
01-23-2001, 11:50 AM
As much as I would enjoy to see it float, I don't believe it will ever see the water or much sunshine, so UV rays shouldn't be a problem. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif I do like the boiled linseed oil/turpentine idea. I take it all the turpentine evaporates out. What about the turpentine subsitutes, are they close enough to the same thing?

imported_Krueg
01-23-2001, 11:50 AM
As much as I would enjoy to see it float, I don't believe it will ever see the water or much sunshine, so UV rays shouldn't be a problem. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif I do like the boiled linseed oil/turpentine idea. I take it all the turpentine evaporates out. What about the turpentine subsitutes, are they close enough to the same thing?

imported_Krueg
01-23-2001, 11:50 AM
As much as I would enjoy to see it float, I don't believe it will ever see the water or much sunshine, so UV rays shouldn't be a problem. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif I do like the boiled linseed oil/turpentine idea. I take it all the turpentine evaporates out. What about the turpentine subsitutes, are they close enough to the same thing?

Bruce Hooke
01-23-2001, 12:53 PM
Before you go the linseed oil route take a look at something that lists all the stuff in linseed oil. I was shocked when I got a can of raw linseed oil and read the warnings on it. For reasons unknown to me raw linseed oil, and presumably therefore boiled linseed oil as well, has lead in it as well as a whole range of other carcinogenic heavy metals. Tung oil is a bit better but still not truly non-toxic. Vegetable oil has been known to go rancid. For truly non-toxic finishes I would look to either Salad Bowl Oil or Mineral Oil. The latter can be purchased from some cooking supply stores (I have purchased it at Williams-Sonoma) because it is used on cutting boards and salad bowls. As to rivets, my key concern would be that rivets usually stand a bit proud of the surface on the inside. That's potentially not the best situation for a cradle, but I think you have a better chance of getting a safe surface with copper nails and flat roves.

- Bruce

[This message has been edited by Bruce Hooke (edited 01-23-2001).]

Bruce Hooke
01-23-2001, 12:53 PM
Before you go the linseed oil route take a look at something that lists all the stuff in linseed oil. I was shocked when I got a can of raw linseed oil and read the warnings on it. For reasons unknown to me raw linseed oil, and presumably therefore boiled linseed oil as well, has lead in it as well as a whole range of other carcinogenic heavy metals. Tung oil is a bit better but still not truly non-toxic. Vegetable oil has been known to go rancid. For truly non-toxic finishes I would look to either Salad Bowl Oil or Mineral Oil. The latter can be purchased from some cooking supply stores (I have purchased it at Williams-Sonoma) because it is used on cutting boards and salad bowls. As to rivets, my key concern would be that rivets usually stand a bit proud of the surface on the inside. That's potentially not the best situation for a cradle, but I think you have a better chance of getting a safe surface with copper nails and flat roves.

- Bruce

[This message has been edited by Bruce Hooke (edited 01-23-2001).]

Bruce Hooke
01-23-2001, 12:53 PM
Before you go the linseed oil route take a look at something that lists all the stuff in linseed oil. I was shocked when I got a can of raw linseed oil and read the warnings on it. For reasons unknown to me raw linseed oil, and presumably therefore boiled linseed oil as well, has lead in it as well as a whole range of other carcinogenic heavy metals. Tung oil is a bit better but still not truly non-toxic. Vegetable oil has been known to go rancid. For truly non-toxic finishes I would look to either Salad Bowl Oil or Mineral Oil. The latter can be purchased from some cooking supply stores (I have purchased it at Williams-Sonoma) because it is used on cutting boards and salad bowls. As to rivets, my key concern would be that rivets usually stand a bit proud of the surface on the inside. That's potentially not the best situation for a cradle, but I think you have a better chance of getting a safe surface with copper nails and flat roves.

- Bruce

[This message has been edited by Bruce Hooke (edited 01-23-2001).]

Alan D. Hyde
01-23-2001, 01:03 PM
Why not use wedged trunnels?

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
01-23-2001, 01:03 PM
Why not use wedged trunnels?

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
01-23-2001, 01:03 PM
Why not use wedged trunnels?

Alan

imported_Krueg
01-23-2001, 01:09 PM
Eventually, there should be a padded fabric "bumper" lining the inside of the hull. This is supposed to take care of that, but you know how kids are. Alan, I know I could do a search for them, but could you please explain how wedged trunnels work? Again, thanks to you all.

Eric

imported_Krueg
01-23-2001, 01:09 PM
Eventually, there should be a padded fabric "bumper" lining the inside of the hull. This is supposed to take care of that, but you know how kids are. Alan, I know I could do a search for them, but could you please explain how wedged trunnels work? Again, thanks to you all.

Eric

imported_Krueg
01-23-2001, 01:09 PM
Eventually, there should be a padded fabric "bumper" lining the inside of the hull. This is supposed to take care of that, but you know how kids are. Alan, I know I could do a search for them, but could you please explain how wedged trunnels work? Again, thanks to you all.

Eric

Alan D. Hyde
01-23-2001, 01:29 PM
Essentially wooden pegs with kerfs cut across the ends, into which small glued wedges are driven to hold the pegs in place.

Don't wedge parallel to the grain near the edge of a board or you may cause splitting.

Perpendicular wedging in a hole right near the end of a board must be done with care, or you may split out the small chunk of wood between the hole and the edge.

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
01-23-2001, 01:29 PM
Essentially wooden pegs with kerfs cut across the ends, into which small glued wedges are driven to hold the pegs in place.

Don't wedge parallel to the grain near the edge of a board or you may cause splitting.

Perpendicular wedging in a hole right near the end of a board must be done with care, or you may split out the small chunk of wood between the hole and the edge.

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
01-23-2001, 01:29 PM
Essentially wooden pegs with kerfs cut across the ends, into which small glued wedges are driven to hold the pegs in place.

Don't wedge parallel to the grain near the edge of a board or you may cause splitting.

Perpendicular wedging in a hole right near the end of a board must be done with care, or you may split out the small chunk of wood between the hole and the edge.

Alan

imported_Krueg
01-23-2001, 01:32 PM
The plans call for 5/32" planking. It sounds like trunnels might be dangerous.

imported_Krueg
01-23-2001, 01:32 PM
The plans call for 5/32" planking. It sounds like trunnels might be dangerous.

imported_Krueg
01-23-2001, 01:32 PM
The plans call for 5/32" planking. It sounds like trunnels might be dangerous.

John058
01-23-2001, 05:49 PM
...little tip I picked up from Norm on "New Yankee Workshop"...was about butcher blocks but same logic applies...don't use vegetable oil as it'll turn rancid...use mineral oil instead...I'd still go with shellac unless the kid's a boozer as alcohol will soften it again http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

John058
01-23-2001, 05:49 PM
...little tip I picked up from Norm on "New Yankee Workshop"...was about butcher blocks but same logic applies...don't use vegetable oil as it'll turn rancid...use mineral oil instead...I'd still go with shellac unless the kid's a boozer as alcohol will soften it again http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

John058
01-23-2001, 05:49 PM
...little tip I picked up from Norm on "New Yankee Workshop"...was about butcher blocks but same logic applies...don't use vegetable oil as it'll turn rancid...use mineral oil instead...I'd still go with shellac unless the kid's a boozer as alcohol will soften it again http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

imported_Krueg
01-23-2001, 05:58 PM
Thanks John I think that I will probably go with your and Tom's idea. I know it's said often, but I'll say it again. I love this place. Nowhere else can you find the quality of information, conversation, and sometimes good old fashioned B.S.

imported_Krueg
01-23-2001, 05:58 PM
Thanks John I think that I will probably go with your and Tom's idea. I know it's said often, but I'll say it again. I love this place. Nowhere else can you find the quality of information, conversation, and sometimes good old fashioned B.S.

imported_Krueg
01-23-2001, 05:58 PM
Thanks John I think that I will probably go with your and Tom's idea. I know it's said often, but I'll say it again. I love this place. Nowhere else can you find the quality of information, conversation, and sometimes good old fashioned B.S.

John058
01-23-2001, 07:27 PM
...you're most welcome Eric (from my pulpit)...I've said it before and I'll say it somemore...there's plenty of jewels amongst the roadapples in here and Woodenboat deserves all the credit it's garnered for bringing us BS'rs together...Y'all take care and bless you for taking the time to think of the safety of little people

John058
01-23-2001, 07:27 PM
...you're most welcome Eric (from my pulpit)...I've said it before and I'll say it somemore...there's plenty of jewels amongst the roadapples in here and Woodenboat deserves all the credit it's garnered for bringing us BS'rs together...Y'all take care and bless you for taking the time to think of the safety of little people

John058
01-23-2001, 07:27 PM
...you're most welcome Eric (from my pulpit)...I've said it before and I'll say it somemore...there's plenty of jewels amongst the roadapples in here and Woodenboat deserves all the credit it's garnered for bringing us BS'rs together...Y'all take care and bless you for taking the time to think of the safety of little people

Alan D. Hyde
01-24-2001, 12:24 PM
The laps would be 5/16.

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
01-24-2001, 12:24 PM
The laps would be 5/16.

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
01-24-2001, 12:24 PM
The laps would be 5/16.

Alan

imported_Krueg
01-24-2001, 12:45 PM
Good point. I take it that driving the wedges would need to be done very carefully this close to the edge of the planks. You then chisel or saw off the protruding portion of trunnel?

imported_Krueg
01-24-2001, 12:45 PM
Good point. I take it that driving the wedges would need to be done very carefully this close to the edge of the planks. You then chisel or saw off the protruding portion of trunnel?

imported_Krueg
01-24-2001, 12:45 PM
Good point. I take it that driving the wedges would need to be done very carefully this close to the edge of the planks. You then chisel or saw off the protruding portion of trunnel?

Alan D. Hyde
01-24-2001, 02:08 PM
Yup.

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
01-24-2001, 02:08 PM
Yup.

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
01-24-2001, 02:08 PM
Yup.

Alan

Keith Wilson
01-25-2001, 10:19 AM
I built a couple of glued-lapstrake cradle boats using 1/8" lauan doorskin plywood which finishes bright very nicely - I used paint inside, varnish out. "Real" wood would be prettier, no doubt, but I was skeptical about planking that thin with my level of skill and patience. Since you're not going to put it in the water very much (if at all), you could glue the plank laps. This wouldn't work with a real boat, since the natural wood planking needs to be able to move a bit at the laps to shrink/swell, but it wouldn't matter on a cradle boat. Shiny copper rivets would sure look nice, though. Trunnels that small make me twitch just thinking about it.

Keith Wilson
01-25-2001, 10:19 AM
I built a couple of glued-lapstrake cradle boats using 1/8" lauan doorskin plywood which finishes bright very nicely - I used paint inside, varnish out. "Real" wood would be prettier, no doubt, but I was skeptical about planking that thin with my level of skill and patience. Since you're not going to put it in the water very much (if at all), you could glue the plank laps. This wouldn't work with a real boat, since the natural wood planking needs to be able to move a bit at the laps to shrink/swell, but it wouldn't matter on a cradle boat. Shiny copper rivets would sure look nice, though. Trunnels that small make me twitch just thinking about it.

Keith Wilson
01-25-2001, 10:19 AM
I built a couple of glued-lapstrake cradle boats using 1/8" lauan doorskin plywood which finishes bright very nicely - I used paint inside, varnish out. "Real" wood would be prettier, no doubt, but I was skeptical about planking that thin with my level of skill and patience. Since you're not going to put it in the water very much (if at all), you could glue the plank laps. This wouldn't work with a real boat, since the natural wood planking needs to be able to move a bit at the laps to shrink/swell, but it wouldn't matter on a cradle boat. Shiny copper rivets would sure look nice, though. Trunnels that small make me twitch just thinking about it.

G. Schollmeier
01-25-2001, 11:12 AM
Trunnels that small are easy. I have not done this with a boat. But I have used round toothpicks in the manner of a trunnel. Drill, glue, tap into place, and cut flush. I think this would work in your case. Gary

G. Schollmeier
01-25-2001, 11:12 AM
Trunnels that small are easy. I have not done this with a boat. But I have used round toothpicks in the manner of a trunnel. Drill, glue, tap into place, and cut flush. I think this would work in your case. Gary

G. Schollmeier
01-25-2001, 11:12 AM
Trunnels that small are easy. I have not done this with a boat. But I have used round toothpicks in the manner of a trunnel. Drill, glue, tap into place, and cut flush. I think this would work in your case. Gary

Ross Faneuf
01-25-2001, 03:44 PM
Another non-toxic oil finish is walnut oil, which is readily available. It's very stable for a vegetable oil, and doesn't get gummy. Many of us pipers use it to keep the wooden bits of our pipes (African blackwood) in condition. Also good as a salad bowl finish.

Ross Faneuf
01-25-2001, 03:44 PM
Another non-toxic oil finish is walnut oil, which is readily available. It's very stable for a vegetable oil, and doesn't get gummy. Many of us pipers use it to keep the wooden bits of our pipes (African blackwood) in condition. Also good as a salad bowl finish.

Ross Faneuf
01-25-2001, 03:44 PM
Another non-toxic oil finish is walnut oil, which is readily available. It's very stable for a vegetable oil, and doesn't get gummy. Many of us pipers use it to keep the wooden bits of our pipes (African blackwood) in condition. Also good as a salad bowl finish.

sawcutmill
01-26-2001, 06:28 AM
Here at woodwater.com , we can supply unfinished trunnels in any size required, all made of black locust, a wood that will not rot.Locust is the traditional trunnel stock of the ages,before metal came into favor for fasteners.

sawcutmill
01-26-2001, 06:28 AM
Here at woodwater.com , we can supply unfinished trunnels in any size required, all made of black locust, a wood that will not rot.Locust is the traditional trunnel stock of the ages,before metal came into favor for fasteners.

sawcutmill
01-26-2001, 06:28 AM
Here at woodwater.com , we can supply unfinished trunnels in any size required, all made of black locust, a wood that will not rot.Locust is the traditional trunnel stock of the ages,before metal came into favor for fasteners.

Tonyr
02-08-2001, 07:57 PM
Originally posted by Ross Faneuf:
Another non-toxic oil finish is walnut oil, which is readily available. It's very stable for a vegetable oil, and doesn't get gummy. Many of us pipers use it to keep the wooden bits of our pipes (African blackwood) in condition. Also good as a salad bowl finish.

I second this suggestion! I use walnut oil on a range of spoons and similar utensils made from birds eye maple. Soak on about three coats, with a day or two between them. If you have any oil left over, it makes a great salad oil. To get it cheap, go to a bulk food store around Passover, and you will find it in the kosher section. Ordinary food stores overcharge! Have fun. Tony.

Tonyr
02-08-2001, 07:57 PM
Originally posted by Ross Faneuf:
Another non-toxic oil finish is walnut oil, which is readily available. It's very stable for a vegetable oil, and doesn't get gummy. Many of us pipers use it to keep the wooden bits of our pipes (African blackwood) in condition. Also good as a salad bowl finish.

I second this suggestion! I use walnut oil on a range of spoons and similar utensils made from birds eye maple. Soak on about three coats, with a day or two between them. If you have any oil left over, it makes a great salad oil. To get it cheap, go to a bulk food store around Passover, and you will find it in the kosher section. Ordinary food stores overcharge! Have fun. Tony.

Tonyr
02-08-2001, 07:57 PM
Originally posted by Ross Faneuf:
Another non-toxic oil finish is walnut oil, which is readily available. It's very stable for a vegetable oil, and doesn't get gummy. Many of us pipers use it to keep the wooden bits of our pipes (African blackwood) in condition. Also good as a salad bowl finish.

I second this suggestion! I use walnut oil on a range of spoons and similar utensils made from birds eye maple. Soak on about three coats, with a day or two between them. If you have any oil left over, it makes a great salad oil. To get it cheap, go to a bulk food store around Passover, and you will find it in the kosher section. Ordinary food stores overcharge! Have fun. Tony.

imported_Krueg
02-09-2001, 08:49 AM
I think I'll try your suggestion of the walnut oil as well as the shellac on a couple of test pieces. That way it'll be easier to choose and not wonder if maybe the other finish would've been more to my liking. I appreciate all the responses.

Eric

imported_Krueg
02-09-2001, 08:49 AM
I think I'll try your suggestion of the walnut oil as well as the shellac on a couple of test pieces. That way it'll be easier to choose and not wonder if maybe the other finish would've been more to my liking. I appreciate all the responses.

Eric

imported_Krueg
02-09-2001, 08:49 AM
I think I'll try your suggestion of the walnut oil as well as the shellac on a couple of test pieces. That way it'll be easier to choose and not wonder if maybe the other finish would've been more to my liking. I appreciate all the responses.

Eric

Scott Rosen
02-09-2001, 10:19 AM
Why not plank it with teak and leave it bare?

No finishes to apply and maintain, no toxicity and best of all, no splinters. Freshly sanded teak, if left indoors, will keep it's light brown color for a good long time. When it starts to dull, just wash it with a mixture of water and tsp. Of course the tsp is toxic, but it's just a form of soap that you will rinse off before putting any kids back in the cradle.

Scott Rosen
02-09-2001, 10:19 AM
Why not plank it with teak and leave it bare?

No finishes to apply and maintain, no toxicity and best of all, no splinters. Freshly sanded teak, if left indoors, will keep it's light brown color for a good long time. When it starts to dull, just wash it with a mixture of water and tsp. Of course the tsp is toxic, but it's just a form of soap that you will rinse off before putting any kids back in the cradle.

Scott Rosen
02-09-2001, 10:19 AM
Why not plank it with teak and leave it bare?

No finishes to apply and maintain, no toxicity and best of all, no splinters. Freshly sanded teak, if left indoors, will keep it's light brown color for a good long time. When it starts to dull, just wash it with a mixture of water and tsp. Of course the tsp is toxic, but it's just a form of soap that you will rinse off before putting any kids back in the cradle.

imported_Krueg
02-09-2001, 10:52 AM
Interesting... I hadn't really given much thought to teak (mainly because of cost). It would be beautiful and I could still use another type of wood for knees, breasthook, stem, sternpost and chines. I wonder, should the transom be of the same wood as the planking?

imported_Krueg
02-09-2001, 10:52 AM
Interesting... I hadn't really given much thought to teak (mainly because of cost). It would be beautiful and I could still use another type of wood for knees, breasthook, stem, sternpost and chines. I wonder, should the transom be of the same wood as the planking?

imported_Krueg
02-09-2001, 10:52 AM
Interesting... I hadn't really given much thought to teak (mainly because of cost). It would be beautiful and I could still use another type of wood for knees, breasthook, stem, sternpost and chines. I wonder, should the transom be of the same wood as the planking?

John058
02-09-2001, 06:48 PM
Transom=Mahogany, or nuthur' contrasty wood (walnut, rosewood, cherry), as it'll never see water. Gold leaf lettering would stand out great on it also with the "new addition's" handle or something like "Our Joy".

John058
02-09-2001, 06:48 PM
Transom=Mahogany, or nuthur' contrasty wood (walnut, rosewood, cherry), as it'll never see water. Gold leaf lettering would stand out great on it also with the "new addition's" handle or something like "Our Joy".

John058
02-09-2001, 06:48 PM
Transom=Mahogany, or nuthur' contrasty wood (walnut, rosewood, cherry), as it'll never see water. Gold leaf lettering would stand out great on it also with the "new addition's" handle or something like "Our Joy".