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David G
12-05-2014, 11:39 AM
As with many things... it's the minority who cause the majority of the problems. When this is not identified and culled... a culture begins to develop --

http://www.wnyc.org/story/can-the-nypd-spot-the-abusive-cop/


Can the NYPD Spot the Abusive Cop?The police department pioneered the use of computer statistics to identify crime trends. But they don't have a system to identify problem-prone officers.

Records also show that a relatively small number of cops generate the most civilian complaints — and the department routinely ignores recommendations on how to discipline the worst of them. All of which calls into question just how seriously the NYPD polices its own.
“I think there’s been a really systematic failure of accountability on the part of the NYPD,” said Sam Walker, a retired criminal justice professor from the University of Nebraska-Omaha who recently served as an expert witness in the stop-and-frisk trial.
He said the department does have multiple personnel databases that keep information on things like civilian complaints and disciplinary histories for its 35,000 officers. The department also monitors cops who are accused of excessive force.
But Walker says it’s not enough. He says the NYPD puts a lot of energy into spotting crime trends and should put similar resources into finding problem cops.
“If you could devise a system to identify them and identify them early, you could prevent a lot of inappropriate actions out there on the street,” Walker said.
And you could save at least some of the more than $100 million the city spends each year to settle lawsuits against the NYPD.
There’s no way to check how often the NYPD disciplines individual cops, because disciplinary files in New York state are confidential. There are, however, public records that show that cops with numerous red flags have been allowed to stay on the street.

hanleyclifford
12-05-2014, 11:45 AM
But the public perception comes to be based on that "bad" minority.

Ian McColgin
12-05-2014, 12:00 PM
The "compstat" and "broken windows" tools that Jack Maple (diseased) and (again) Commissioner Bratton pioneered were controversial enough when developed and would have really terrorize officers if also used internally. Unfortunatly, like any community police presence, they are also tools that can become tools for oppression, like by an occupation force, and that's what has begun to happen. It will be interesting to see if Bratton can take it to the next stage with real community participation or whether he's hit is personal best.

David G
12-05-2014, 12:08 PM
But the public perception comes to be based on that "bad" minority.

Naturally. As in any setting.... it's not the majority, going about their day, doing their job adequately or well or excellently... who garner most of the attention.

In the best of all management structures - those who excel should come to internal notice... and be rewarded. And those bad apples should also come to internal notice and be culled. Before they tarnish the reputation of the department.

The article is about how the NYPD (and, I suspect, many departments), fail to detect the bad apples early. And fail to cull them - even when they behave badly enough to garner outside attention.

hanleyclifford
12-05-2014, 02:11 PM
Why didn't Internal Affairs detect and report on the officer's background before the fact?

David G
12-05-2014, 02:41 PM
Why didn't Internal Affairs detect and report on the officer's background before the fact?

Indeed. Because, apparently, they haven't developed the tools or the perspective to do so. As a jack-leg economist... I always think about incentives. Seems they're not there.

Phillip Allen
12-05-2014, 04:08 PM
every cop who is fired incurs the wrath of the union... that costs a lot and may not be considered 'worth' it

hanleyclifford
12-05-2014, 04:10 PM
Indeed. Because, apparently, they haven't developed the tools or the perspective to do so. As a jack-leg economist... I always think about incentives. Seems they're not there. Incentives or systemic checks and balances. Perhaps we can learn from the old Communist technique of having a Party 2ic in military units; separate lines of responsibility or command - possibly elected Chiefs of Police.

Ian McColgin
12-05-2014, 06:14 PM
When a department develops a habit of excessive force, it's command related. Internal Affairs is there to investigate internal corruption of the normal sort, not to take the place of effective leadership.

Phillip Allen
12-05-2014, 06:16 PM
When a department develops a habit of excessive force, it's command related. Internal Affairs is there to investigate internal corruption of the normal sort, not to take the place of effective leadership.

maybe we should let ALL people accused of crimes investigate themselves?

Ian McColgin
12-05-2014, 06:25 PM
Obviously not. Anyone society invests with powers of coersion and deadly force will turn into an oppressive bully without full community involvement and control. The police can be part of democratic self-governance or they can be the enforcers of oppression and, without other control, they'll just make that oppression up on their own.

Leadership involves command staff, political oversight, and citizen involvement. Surrender any of these elements and the department will drift to the natural temptations.