PDA

View Full Version : Outboard transom protectors?



AlanD
03-16-2004, 12:33 PM
I'm thinking about buying a little 4-horse outboard to hang on the back of my wooden drift boat, but I don't want to tear up my nicely varnished ash transom. I've been looking around for transom plates -- preferably in bronze -- that I could mount on both sides of the transom. I thought about fabricating a couple of simple flat plates, but that doesn't seem very secure -- my dad's old aluminum fishing boat had a transom plate with recesses for the thumb screws so that the motor could not slip off the top of the transom even if it was a little loose. I can't even find a prefabricated plate like that one in aluminum or plastic. Does anyone know of a source for something like this? I've Googled "transom plate" and "transom protector" and haven't come up with much.

AlanD
03-16-2004, 12:33 PM
I'm thinking about buying a little 4-horse outboard to hang on the back of my wooden drift boat, but I don't want to tear up my nicely varnished ash transom. I've been looking around for transom plates -- preferably in bronze -- that I could mount on both sides of the transom. I thought about fabricating a couple of simple flat plates, but that doesn't seem very secure -- my dad's old aluminum fishing boat had a transom plate with recesses for the thumb screws so that the motor could not slip off the top of the transom even if it was a little loose. I can't even find a prefabricated plate like that one in aluminum or plastic. Does anyone know of a source for something like this? I've Googled "transom plate" and "transom protector" and haven't come up with much.

AlanD
03-16-2004, 12:33 PM
I'm thinking about buying a little 4-horse outboard to hang on the back of my wooden drift boat, but I don't want to tear up my nicely varnished ash transom. I've been looking around for transom plates -- preferably in bronze -- that I could mount on both sides of the transom. I thought about fabricating a couple of simple flat plates, but that doesn't seem very secure -- my dad's old aluminum fishing boat had a transom plate with recesses for the thumb screws so that the motor could not slip off the top of the transom even if it was a little loose. I can't even find a prefabricated plate like that one in aluminum or plastic. Does anyone know of a source for something like this? I've Googled "transom plate" and "transom protector" and haven't come up with much.

reinbilt
03-16-2004, 04:47 PM
Alan,

I've got a place up here in Northern Michigan that will make about anything out of stainless steel at a very reasonable cost. I'm thinking of having them fabricate a transon protector for the wherry I'm building, something that bends across the top so the top and both sides are covered. I'm sure there are several places in your area of Michigan that could do the same thing. The company I deal with is Moran Iron Works in Onaway MI.

reinbilt
03-16-2004, 04:47 PM
Alan,

I've got a place up here in Northern Michigan that will make about anything out of stainless steel at a very reasonable cost. I'm thinking of having them fabricate a transon protector for the wherry I'm building, something that bends across the top so the top and both sides are covered. I'm sure there are several places in your area of Michigan that could do the same thing. The company I deal with is Moran Iron Works in Onaway MI.

reinbilt
03-16-2004, 04:47 PM
Alan,

I've got a place up here in Northern Michigan that will make about anything out of stainless steel at a very reasonable cost. I'm thinking of having them fabricate a transon protector for the wherry I'm building, something that bends across the top so the top and both sides are covered. I'm sure there are several places in your area of Michigan that could do the same thing. The company I deal with is Moran Iron Works in Onaway MI.

Tonyr
03-16-2004, 08:12 PM
Hum, yes, Alan. A cautionary tale, and I am still feeling a bit stupid. Two of us wanted to go fishing last spring, and I hung a 30 year old 7.5 h.p Evinrude Yacht-twin off the transom of my Whitehall. It did not fit, (outboards expect at least an inch thichness or so) of course, so I padded the too thin transom with a bit of scrap, and we set off.

Three hours later, after a good fishing session, we were running for home when the pad worked loose, and the motor jumped off the stern and gracefully sunk, and stopped. I had a safety line, so hauled it in, and rowed home.

My local mechanic said cheerfuly, yes, we get a lot like this, see you in two weeks. He was as good as his word, and the motor is now fine.

I had a good look at a standard outboard mount, and (then!) noticed that the metal cover has a 1/4" inch lip at the top, so placed that if the pad screws work loose, thay will catch under the lip, and the motor won't fall off.

I learnt one main thing, and that is that if you are going to pad out a transom temporarily, at least tack the scrap wood on with a couple of screws so the loose piece can't fall off. Preferably do the job right in the first place, and add a proper piece of metal complete with the retaining lip.

Tony.

[ 03-17-2004, 08:42 AM: Message edited by: Tonyr ]

Tonyr
03-16-2004, 08:12 PM
Hum, yes, Alan. A cautionary tale, and I am still feeling a bit stupid. Two of us wanted to go fishing last spring, and I hung a 30 year old 7.5 h.p Evinrude Yacht-twin off the transom of my Whitehall. It did not fit, (outboards expect at least an inch thichness or so) of course, so I padded the too thin transom with a bit of scrap, and we set off.

Three hours later, after a good fishing session, we were running for home when the pad worked loose, and the motor jumped off the stern and gracefully sunk, and stopped. I had a safety line, so hauled it in, and rowed home.

My local mechanic said cheerfuly, yes, we get a lot like this, see you in two weeks. He was as good as his word, and the motor is now fine.

I had a good look at a standard outboard mount, and (then!) noticed that the metal cover has a 1/4" inch lip at the top, so placed that if the pad screws work loose, thay will catch under the lip, and the motor won't fall off.

I learnt one main thing, and that is that if you are going to pad out a transom temporarily, at least tack the scrap wood on with a couple of screws so the loose piece can't fall off. Preferably do the job right in the first place, and add a proper piece of metal complete with the retaining lip.

Tony.

[ 03-17-2004, 08:42 AM: Message edited by: Tonyr ]

Tonyr
03-16-2004, 08:12 PM
Hum, yes, Alan. A cautionary tale, and I am still feeling a bit stupid. Two of us wanted to go fishing last spring, and I hung a 30 year old 7.5 h.p Evinrude Yacht-twin off the transom of my Whitehall. It did not fit, (outboards expect at least an inch thichness or so) of course, so I padded the too thin transom with a bit of scrap, and we set off.

Three hours later, after a good fishing session, we were running for home when the pad worked loose, and the motor jumped off the stern and gracefully sunk, and stopped. I had a safety line, so hauled it in, and rowed home.

My local mechanic said cheerfuly, yes, we get a lot like this, see you in two weeks. He was as good as his word, and the motor is now fine.

I had a good look at a standard outboard mount, and (then!) noticed that the metal cover has a 1/4" inch lip at the top, so placed that if the pad screws work loose, thay will catch under the lip, and the motor won't fall off.

I learnt one main thing, and that is that if you are going to pad out a transom temporarily, at least tack the scrap wood on with a couple of screws so the loose piece can't fall off. Preferably do the job right in the first place, and add a proper piece of metal complete with the retaining lip.

Tony.

[ 03-17-2004, 08:42 AM: Message edited by: Tonyr ]