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Paul Pless
10-30-2014, 07:12 AM
I need a small one, electric. I have about four hundred linear feet (non continuous) of concrete seam to break out. This is where two separate pours of concrete were done. Its about thirty years old and the seam is no longer tight and its impossible to water proof. So I need to widen and deepen this seam and then fill with a water proof caulk.

In the future I will have some other uses for it, including breaking up a small porch slab.

Recommendations?

hokiefan
10-30-2014, 07:23 AM
This sounds like a prime candidate for a rental. That way you can get one big enough to really do the job without breaking the bank. My $0.02

Cheers,

Bobby

Figment
10-30-2014, 07:30 AM
I'd go rental as well. If nothing else, it will teach you more about the one you want when you go to buy.

Paul Pless
10-30-2014, 07:31 AM
Its a job we'll do over the course of a couple of months. So I think buying makes more sense than does rental.

RonW
10-30-2014, 08:03 AM
This is where two separate pours of concrete were done. Its about thirty years old and the seam is no longer tight and its impossible to water proof. So I need to widen and deepen this seam and then fill with a water proof caulk.

As I read it, you are using the wrong tool, use a concrete saw with a wide blade and saw and caulk it all in one day..easily............

Chris Coose
10-30-2014, 08:04 AM
I found a relatively unused hammer drill on craigslist with bits and chisels. I found the rental guys placed a real premium on the wear they measured on bit. If I had a big job on a rental, I'd look to buy bits.

Bubba L.
10-30-2014, 08:16 AM
I agree with the concrete saw especially to give a clean edge on the top. You can get a blade that will fit a circular saw. I had an old saw that I used for just that purpose. If the concrete is thick then you can use a hammer drill inside the cut. I have a Dewalt that I've used quite a lot and when I was doing concrete form work at Engles Ship Yard in Pascagoula we used Dewalts that took a lot of abuse.

Gene

Canoeyawl
10-30-2014, 08:16 AM
Without seeing it, two saw cuts spaced however far apart and break the concrete with a sledge. Concrete breaks up pretty easily.
Rent the saw, make the cuts and break out when you want to.

Paul Girouard
10-30-2014, 08:39 AM
Hire it done , have the concrete cutter stack two or three blades side by side , like a dado head , "chase" the expansion joint.

You say it's "impossiblle to water proof". If it's seeping water from below , more than likely it all ways will. Even if you cut the joint and fill it with epoxy , if there's hydronic pressure under the slab it will find a way to come thru.

You may need to intercept the water with a french style drain.

If it's a roof , unlikely , but possible , you may have other issues.

One thing for sure, a demo hammer isn't the proper tools to create a caulk-able seam between concrete.

RonW
10-30-2014, 08:55 AM
Well don't listen to Bubba, the last thing you want to use is a circular saw, the dust will gum it up..Rent a stand up walk behind with a 1/4 or even 3/8 wide blade.
Or go to home depot and buy a little 4 inch high speed right angle grinder for about $80. and again get 1/4 or 3/8 wide blade for it. Yes they are readily available and I have one that I use all the time, fast and easy......you also need to use urethane caulk......

Michael D. Storey
10-30-2014, 09:46 AM
1. Jack Hammers are dangerous and should not be seen in the hands of anyone much over 50
2. There is no thing that you can do to stop the water with any kind of filler. You might temporarily slow it down. I suggest that you put some consideration into draining it permanently.
3. In my experience, I would suggest redirecting the water and using as elastomeric filler.
4. If you really like work, re-direct the water (which, in your sunny clime will continue to play Old Harry with the slab every time that it freezes), and pour a couple inches of sand mix on top.
5. If you are decided to fill the crack, Sika makes first-quality elastomerics designed to fill concrete cracks.
6. Good Luck, Man

Paul Pless
10-30-2014, 10:09 AM
There'll be no getting away from draining the water properly. We use about 3500 gallons of it per day to wash down the facility.

Paul Pless
10-30-2014, 10:11 AM
I'm quite familiar with elastomeric caulks. . .

Old Dryfoot
10-30-2014, 10:27 AM
I do this sort of thing for a living. We use a Hitachi for this type of work, sorry I can't recall the model off hand.

Chip it out and and get it good and clean with an acid wash of muriatic and water, rinsed with water after. To fill it I'd recommend you use a hydraulic cement rather than a caulking. It's an easy fix but it's loud and dirty work.

ETA: Is this a cold joint in the slab or a floor to wall joint?

Bubba L.
10-30-2014, 10:27 AM
Well don't listen to Bubba, the last thing you want to use is a circular saw, the dust will gum it up..Rent a stand up walk behind with a 1/4 or even 3/8 wide blade.
Or go to home depot and buy a little 4 inch high speed right angle grinder for about $80. and again get 1/4 or 3/8 wide blade for it. Yes they are readily available and I have one that I use all the time, fast and easy......you also need to use urethane caulk......

"I had an old saw that I used for just that purpose."

Gene

Old Dryfoot
10-30-2014, 10:31 AM
We've used an old Makita with a diamond blade to cut hundreds and hundreds of feet of slab, no problems. It's fitted with a water system and it just won't die. . .