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SSACKLOW
03-14-2001, 12:11 PM
Looking for help in obtaining on-line material for oiling teak and suggestions who is the best source for high gloss look with out a tremendous amount of work..thank you in advance

SSACKLOW
03-14-2001, 12:11 PM
Looking for help in obtaining on-line material for oiling teak and suggestions who is the best source for high gloss look with out a tremendous amount of work..thank you in advance

SSACKLOW
03-14-2001, 12:11 PM
Looking for help in obtaining on-line material for oiling teak and suggestions who is the best source for high gloss look with out a tremendous amount of work..thank you in advance

Scott Rosen
03-14-2001, 01:42 PM
Oh boy.

There are three phrases in your post that can never be used in the same thought: teak oil, high gloss, and without a tremendous amount of work.

1. "Teak oil" will not give you high gloss. If you use it on exterior teak it won't last a month in sun. It can be used in the cabin, but applying a good oil finish takes a lot of work, primarily stripping the old finish, sanding and cleaning, and then wet sanding several coats of tung oil. Even for interior work, you will need to reapply a coat or two every year.

2. High gloss comes in a can or bottle marked "varnish." For exterior work you need at least eight coats. Applying the eight coats is a breeze compared to the prep work that you must put into the wood before you even apply the first coat.

3. Not a lot of work. There is only one way to get a really good finish without a lot of work. That's to hire a professional to do it for you.

Scott Rosen
03-14-2001, 01:42 PM
Oh boy.

There are three phrases in your post that can never be used in the same thought: teak oil, high gloss, and without a tremendous amount of work.

1. "Teak oil" will not give you high gloss. If you use it on exterior teak it won't last a month in sun. It can be used in the cabin, but applying a good oil finish takes a lot of work, primarily stripping the old finish, sanding and cleaning, and then wet sanding several coats of tung oil. Even for interior work, you will need to reapply a coat or two every year.

2. High gloss comes in a can or bottle marked "varnish." For exterior work you need at least eight coats. Applying the eight coats is a breeze compared to the prep work that you must put into the wood before you even apply the first coat.

3. Not a lot of work. There is only one way to get a really good finish without a lot of work. That's to hire a professional to do it for you.

Scott Rosen
03-14-2001, 01:42 PM
Oh boy.

There are three phrases in your post that can never be used in the same thought: teak oil, high gloss, and without a tremendous amount of work.

1. "Teak oil" will not give you high gloss. If you use it on exterior teak it won't last a month in sun. It can be used in the cabin, but applying a good oil finish takes a lot of work, primarily stripping the old finish, sanding and cleaning, and then wet sanding several coats of tung oil. Even for interior work, you will need to reapply a coat or two every year.

2. High gloss comes in a can or bottle marked "varnish." For exterior work you need at least eight coats. Applying the eight coats is a breeze compared to the prep work that you must put into the wood before you even apply the first coat.

3. Not a lot of work. There is only one way to get a really good finish without a lot of work. That's to hire a professional to do it for you.

Ed Nye
03-14-2001, 03:41 PM
And, if you decide on oil and you apply it every other month, it will turn black from the accumulated dirt and mold/mildew in a couple of years. Varnish will require a couple of sandings and maintenance coats each year, or you will be taking it all off and starting over. Large areas of bright teak is a tremendous amount of work unless you keep it out of the sun and dry it every morning and after every rain. "Lower" maintenance is paint and small amounts of bright trim.
Takes your choices, Ed

Ed Nye
03-14-2001, 03:41 PM
And, if you decide on oil and you apply it every other month, it will turn black from the accumulated dirt and mold/mildew in a couple of years. Varnish will require a couple of sandings and maintenance coats each year, or you will be taking it all off and starting over. Large areas of bright teak is a tremendous amount of work unless you keep it out of the sun and dry it every morning and after every rain. "Lower" maintenance is paint and small amounts of bright trim.
Takes your choices, Ed

Ed Nye
03-14-2001, 03:41 PM
And, if you decide on oil and you apply it every other month, it will turn black from the accumulated dirt and mold/mildew in a couple of years. Varnish will require a couple of sandings and maintenance coats each year, or you will be taking it all off and starting over. Large areas of bright teak is a tremendous amount of work unless you keep it out of the sun and dry it every morning and after every rain. "Lower" maintenance is paint and small amounts of bright trim.
Takes your choices, Ed

Mike Keers
03-14-2001, 08:07 PM
Yeah, this is always the can of worms for boat owners, and maybe the hottest boat forum topic ever (on many BBS). We all got our opinions, just like....well, you know http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif

A compromise worth considering is Cetol. The compromise is that it's not glossy, sort of a soft sheen. But it's easy....three initial coats and then another once or twice a year, no prep, just brush on.

Some object to the orange-ish color it gives the wood, but Sikkens offers a newer, clearer version.

Cetol is a polymerized oil type stuff...none of the problems of teak oil, none of the hassle of varnish, and easy to maintain. Sort of a "super" exterior Danish oil.

Practical Sailor, The "Consumer Reports" of sailing, has been testing both oil and varnish-type coatings for many years in an on-going test, and Cetol blows everything else away for durability short of the two-part "systems" like Smith & Co's CPES-based catalyzed varnish.

It all depends on whether you'd rather be varnishing or sailing. Some people want their boats to be works of art (and some are), others would rather use them.

My personal choice is to keep the varnish below, and use Cetol to weather. Different oars for different long boats, eh?
Mike

Mike Keers
03-14-2001, 08:07 PM
Yeah, this is always the can of worms for boat owners, and maybe the hottest boat forum topic ever (on many BBS). We all got our opinions, just like....well, you know http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif

A compromise worth considering is Cetol. The compromise is that it's not glossy, sort of a soft sheen. But it's easy....three initial coats and then another once or twice a year, no prep, just brush on.

Some object to the orange-ish color it gives the wood, but Sikkens offers a newer, clearer version.

Cetol is a polymerized oil type stuff...none of the problems of teak oil, none of the hassle of varnish, and easy to maintain. Sort of a "super" exterior Danish oil.

Practical Sailor, The "Consumer Reports" of sailing, has been testing both oil and varnish-type coatings for many years in an on-going test, and Cetol blows everything else away for durability short of the two-part "systems" like Smith & Co's CPES-based catalyzed varnish.

It all depends on whether you'd rather be varnishing or sailing. Some people want their boats to be works of art (and some are), others would rather use them.

My personal choice is to keep the varnish below, and use Cetol to weather. Different oars for different long boats, eh?
Mike

Mike Keers
03-14-2001, 08:07 PM
Yeah, this is always the can of worms for boat owners, and maybe the hottest boat forum topic ever (on many BBS). We all got our opinions, just like....well, you know http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif

A compromise worth considering is Cetol. The compromise is that it's not glossy, sort of a soft sheen. But it's easy....three initial coats and then another once or twice a year, no prep, just brush on.

Some object to the orange-ish color it gives the wood, but Sikkens offers a newer, clearer version.

Cetol is a polymerized oil type stuff...none of the problems of teak oil, none of the hassle of varnish, and easy to maintain. Sort of a "super" exterior Danish oil.

Practical Sailor, The "Consumer Reports" of sailing, has been testing both oil and varnish-type coatings for many years in an on-going test, and Cetol blows everything else away for durability short of the two-part "systems" like Smith & Co's CPES-based catalyzed varnish.

It all depends on whether you'd rather be varnishing or sailing. Some people want their boats to be works of art (and some are), others would rather use them.

My personal choice is to keep the varnish below, and use Cetol to weather. Different oars for different long boats, eh?
Mike

SSACKLOW
03-15-2001, 08:54 AM
Thank you all for your help..I new it wasn't going to be easy, but I hate to keep on sanding and sanding and sanding even though I realize this is the right way to go. Mike do you or any of the other forum readers have a site address for the Sikken product you talked about or where I can get more information on it? Once again, thanks to all for being so helpful..Stew

SSACKLOW
03-15-2001, 08:54 AM
Thank you all for your help..I new it wasn't going to be easy, but I hate to keep on sanding and sanding and sanding even though I realize this is the right way to go. Mike do you or any of the other forum readers have a site address for the Sikken product you talked about or where I can get more information on it? Once again, thanks to all for being so helpful..Stew

SSACKLOW
03-15-2001, 08:54 AM
Thank you all for your help..I new it wasn't going to be easy, but I hate to keep on sanding and sanding and sanding even though I realize this is the right way to go. Mike do you or any of the other forum readers have a site address for the Sikken product you talked about or where I can get more information on it? Once again, thanks to all for being so helpful..Stew

abe
03-15-2001, 09:17 AM
Sikkens web site follows:

http://www.nam.sikkens.com/index2.html

I have been happy with the products in non marine applications, and may consider it as a replacement for Deks this year on my cedar pram.

abe
03-15-2001, 09:17 AM
Sikkens web site follows:

http://www.nam.sikkens.com/index2.html

I have been happy with the products in non marine applications, and may consider it as a replacement for Deks this year on my cedar pram.

abe
03-15-2001, 09:17 AM
Sikkens web site follows:

http://www.nam.sikkens.com/index2.html

I have been happy with the products in non marine applications, and may consider it as a replacement for Deks this year on my cedar pram.

Albie
03-15-2001, 09:40 AM
WHY PAY SO MUCH MONEY FOR TEAK AND COVER IT WITH SOME OLE' NASTY OIL? IT WILL WEATHER TO A BEAUTIFUL SILVER AND BE NON SLIP.A CLEANING WITH SALT WATER AND A COURSE BRUSH IS ALL THE MAINTENANCE YOU'LL NEED.

Albie
03-15-2001, 09:40 AM
WHY PAY SO MUCH MONEY FOR TEAK AND COVER IT WITH SOME OLE' NASTY OIL? IT WILL WEATHER TO A BEAUTIFUL SILVER AND BE NON SLIP.A CLEANING WITH SALT WATER AND A COURSE BRUSH IS ALL THE MAINTENANCE YOU'LL NEED.

Albie
03-15-2001, 09:40 AM
WHY PAY SO MUCH MONEY FOR TEAK AND COVER IT WITH SOME OLE' NASTY OIL? IT WILL WEATHER TO A BEAUTIFUL SILVER AND BE NON SLIP.A CLEANING WITH SALT WATER AND A COURSE BRUSH IS ALL THE MAINTENANCE YOU'LL NEED.

Peter Black
03-23-2001, 11:20 AM
Hi SSACKLOW
On the west coast of Canada most sailors use Sikkens Cetol instead of Varnish because of the low maintenance and lack of peeling. You can also get it in a gloss but that is not recommended for exterior marine use.
If you are talking about decks and you don’t want to stick out in a crowd (sailor wearing cowboy boots) then leave the teak natural. But remember, it is wood and if water is allowed to pool in a low area it will out think the teak. (more stubborn and persistent on the long haul) So just be attentive and don’t assume it is 100% waterproof. I am maintaining a 50’ plus steel sloop with natural teak decks of over 20 years. They still look good but probably have to be looked at in a few more years. I know of another 46’ wooden ketch and the natural teak decks are completely hooped. The boat is about the same vintage but the decks looks like they are over 100 years old, and they leak like an open hatch.

Many will testify that by scrubbing the decks with simply salt water, it regenerates the oils in the wood to the surface and refreshes the repellant properties of the wood. I really can’t confirm or deny that thought.

Out here on Vancouver Island moss grows on Hummingbird wings so if you let it grow on the decks, it acts as a sponge for the water to gather. Just common sense stuff.

Where is the teak going on the boat?
Pete

Peter Black
03-23-2001, 11:20 AM
Hi SSACKLOW
On the west coast of Canada most sailors use Sikkens Cetol instead of Varnish because of the low maintenance and lack of peeling. You can also get it in a gloss but that is not recommended for exterior marine use.
If you are talking about decks and you don’t want to stick out in a crowd (sailor wearing cowboy boots) then leave the teak natural. But remember, it is wood and if water is allowed to pool in a low area it will out think the teak. (more stubborn and persistent on the long haul) So just be attentive and don’t assume it is 100% waterproof. I am maintaining a 50’ plus steel sloop with natural teak decks of over 20 years. They still look good but probably have to be looked at in a few more years. I know of another 46’ wooden ketch and the natural teak decks are completely hooped. The boat is about the same vintage but the decks looks like they are over 100 years old, and they leak like an open hatch.

Many will testify that by scrubbing the decks with simply salt water, it regenerates the oils in the wood to the surface and refreshes the repellant properties of the wood. I really can’t confirm or deny that thought.

Out here on Vancouver Island moss grows on Hummingbird wings so if you let it grow on the decks, it acts as a sponge for the water to gather. Just common sense stuff.

Where is the teak going on the boat?
Pete

Peter Black
03-23-2001, 11:20 AM
Hi SSACKLOW
On the west coast of Canada most sailors use Sikkens Cetol instead of Varnish because of the low maintenance and lack of peeling. You can also get it in a gloss but that is not recommended for exterior marine use.
If you are talking about decks and you don’t want to stick out in a crowd (sailor wearing cowboy boots) then leave the teak natural. But remember, it is wood and if water is allowed to pool in a low area it will out think the teak. (more stubborn and persistent on the long haul) So just be attentive and don’t assume it is 100% waterproof. I am maintaining a 50’ plus steel sloop with natural teak decks of over 20 years. They still look good but probably have to be looked at in a few more years. I know of another 46’ wooden ketch and the natural teak decks are completely hooped. The boat is about the same vintage but the decks looks like they are over 100 years old, and they leak like an open hatch.

Many will testify that by scrubbing the decks with simply salt water, it regenerates the oils in the wood to the surface and refreshes the repellant properties of the wood. I really can’t confirm or deny that thought.

Out here on Vancouver Island moss grows on Hummingbird wings so if you let it grow on the decks, it acts as a sponge for the water to gather. Just common sense stuff.

Where is the teak going on the boat?
Pete

Art Read
03-23-2001, 12:17 PM
I've used Flood's Deks Olja on "fussy" things like teak steering wheels pretty sucessfully. Part one alone gives good (short term) protection, but no gloss. Keeping it up is a breeze though... Just wipe some more on every couple of months. If you follow their directions and add the part 2 over it you'll get a finish that is hard to tell from varnish. I've found that eventually, (maybe every couple years?) just putting on more of the part 2 won't cut it any more. Really starts looking "tired". But it's still a hell of a lot easier to bring back than scraping varnish! Usually all it takes is moderate sanding. (not really "wooding", just "cleaning it up, so to speak...) Once it looks good again after a wipe of turps you'll know it's ready to start building up coats of both parts again. Sounds harder than it is. 'Course this all pre-supposes you're willing to put in the effort to keep on top of it. If you ever let it "go" the wood will weather and go grey or black and you'll have to "wood" it all again anyway. Anybody else ever used this stuff? It seems to me to be a good "compromise" between fine varnish and regular "Teak Oil", which I find DOES darken and get dirty much too quickly...

Art Read
03-23-2001, 12:17 PM
I've used Flood's Deks Olja on "fussy" things like teak steering wheels pretty sucessfully. Part one alone gives good (short term) protection, but no gloss. Keeping it up is a breeze though... Just wipe some more on every couple of months. If you follow their directions and add the part 2 over it you'll get a finish that is hard to tell from varnish. I've found that eventually, (maybe every couple years?) just putting on more of the part 2 won't cut it any more. Really starts looking "tired". But it's still a hell of a lot easier to bring back than scraping varnish! Usually all it takes is moderate sanding. (not really "wooding", just "cleaning it up, so to speak...) Once it looks good again after a wipe of turps you'll know it's ready to start building up coats of both parts again. Sounds harder than it is. 'Course this all pre-supposes you're willing to put in the effort to keep on top of it. If you ever let it "go" the wood will weather and go grey or black and you'll have to "wood" it all again anyway. Anybody else ever used this stuff? It seems to me to be a good "compromise" between fine varnish and regular "Teak Oil", which I find DOES darken and get dirty much too quickly...

Art Read
03-23-2001, 12:17 PM
I've used Flood's Deks Olja on "fussy" things like teak steering wheels pretty sucessfully. Part one alone gives good (short term) protection, but no gloss. Keeping it up is a breeze though... Just wipe some more on every couple of months. If you follow their directions and add the part 2 over it you'll get a finish that is hard to tell from varnish. I've found that eventually, (maybe every couple years?) just putting on more of the part 2 won't cut it any more. Really starts looking "tired". But it's still a hell of a lot easier to bring back than scraping varnish! Usually all it takes is moderate sanding. (not really "wooding", just "cleaning it up, so to speak...) Once it looks good again after a wipe of turps you'll know it's ready to start building up coats of both parts again. Sounds harder than it is. 'Course this all pre-supposes you're willing to put in the effort to keep on top of it. If you ever let it "go" the wood will weather and go grey or black and you'll have to "wood" it all again anyway. Anybody else ever used this stuff? It seems to me to be a good "compromise" between fine varnish and regular "Teak Oil", which I find DOES darken and get dirty much too quickly...

Scott Rosen
03-23-2001, 02:04 PM
Originally posted by Peter Black:
But remember, it is wood and if water is allowed to pool in a low area it will out think the teak. . . . Many will testify that by scrubbing the decks with simply salt water, it regenerates the oils in the wood to the surface and refreshes the repellant properties of the wood. I really can’t confirm or deny that thought.


If you've got water "pooling" on your deck, then you've got bigger problems than you can solve by any product in can!

Salt water and mild soap work great for keeping bare teak clean. The salt has a bleaching effect with helps keep the wood a nice, light silvery grey. It doesn't regenerate anything or enhance the "repellent" properties of the wood and as far as I can tell after lots of years of teak deck maintenance. It just keeps it clean.

A couple of basic rules for maintaining bare teak. Do not use a stiff bristle brush unless you want to shorten the life of your deck and create valleys in the grain where dirt can collect and mildew can grow. A string mop should be your basic everyday cleaning tool. If you must use a brush because the deck is very dirty or mildew-encrusted, then use a soft bristled brush and stroke across the grain. A solution of TSP and warm water applied with a string mop or a soft brush will clean even the dirtiest teak deck. You can follow it with a bleaching with a mixture of oxcalic acid and water. Rinse well with fresh or salt water.

Scott Rosen
03-23-2001, 02:04 PM
Originally posted by Peter Black:
But remember, it is wood and if water is allowed to pool in a low area it will out think the teak. . . . Many will testify that by scrubbing the decks with simply salt water, it regenerates the oils in the wood to the surface and refreshes the repellant properties of the wood. I really can’t confirm or deny that thought.


If you've got water "pooling" on your deck, then you've got bigger problems than you can solve by any product in can!

Salt water and mild soap work great for keeping bare teak clean. The salt has a bleaching effect with helps keep the wood a nice, light silvery grey. It doesn't regenerate anything or enhance the "repellent" properties of the wood and as far as I can tell after lots of years of teak deck maintenance. It just keeps it clean.

A couple of basic rules for maintaining bare teak. Do not use a stiff bristle brush unless you want to shorten the life of your deck and create valleys in the grain where dirt can collect and mildew can grow. A string mop should be your basic everyday cleaning tool. If you must use a brush because the deck is very dirty or mildew-encrusted, then use a soft bristled brush and stroke across the grain. A solution of TSP and warm water applied with a string mop or a soft brush will clean even the dirtiest teak deck. You can follow it with a bleaching with a mixture of oxcalic acid and water. Rinse well with fresh or salt water.

Scott Rosen
03-23-2001, 02:04 PM
Originally posted by Peter Black:
But remember, it is wood and if water is allowed to pool in a low area it will out think the teak. . . . Many will testify that by scrubbing the decks with simply salt water, it regenerates the oils in the wood to the surface and refreshes the repellant properties of the wood. I really can’t confirm or deny that thought.


If you've got water "pooling" on your deck, then you've got bigger problems than you can solve by any product in can!

Salt water and mild soap work great for keeping bare teak clean. The salt has a bleaching effect with helps keep the wood a nice, light silvery grey. It doesn't regenerate anything or enhance the "repellent" properties of the wood and as far as I can tell after lots of years of teak deck maintenance. It just keeps it clean.

A couple of basic rules for maintaining bare teak. Do not use a stiff bristle brush unless you want to shorten the life of your deck and create valleys in the grain where dirt can collect and mildew can grow. A string mop should be your basic everyday cleaning tool. If you must use a brush because the deck is very dirty or mildew-encrusted, then use a soft bristled brush and stroke across the grain. A solution of TSP and warm water applied with a string mop or a soft brush will clean even the dirtiest teak deck. You can follow it with a bleaching with a mixture of oxcalic acid and water. Rinse well with fresh or salt water.

Peter Black
03-23-2001, 02:28 PM
RE: my comment on pooling or standing water on the deck.
It never ceases to amaze me at how boaters of even substantial size will clutter the deck with “stuff” and leave unkept lines lying about causing birdbaths of green algae.
Too much money and not enough time to enjoy it I suppose. “Ship shape” just isn’t in their vocabulary.
Ps; good point to mention about the stiff bristle brush. I have also seen many decks abused this way including the one I mentioned earlier.

Peter Black
03-23-2001, 02:28 PM
RE: my comment on pooling or standing water on the deck.
It never ceases to amaze me at how boaters of even substantial size will clutter the deck with “stuff” and leave unkept lines lying about causing birdbaths of green algae.
Too much money and not enough time to enjoy it I suppose. “Ship shape” just isn’t in their vocabulary.
Ps; good point to mention about the stiff bristle brush. I have also seen many decks abused this way including the one I mentioned earlier.

Peter Black
03-23-2001, 02:28 PM
RE: my comment on pooling or standing water on the deck.
It never ceases to amaze me at how boaters of even substantial size will clutter the deck with “stuff” and leave unkept lines lying about causing birdbaths of green algae.
Too much money and not enough time to enjoy it I suppose. “Ship shape” just isn’t in their vocabulary.
Ps; good point to mention about the stiff bristle brush. I have also seen many decks abused this way including the one I mentioned earlier.

SSACKLOW
03-27-2001, 12:19 PM
Peter..thank you for the reply and info..have one question..Why would you not use the gloss on the exterior..I have applied on exterior mahagony areas over the Marine Cetol coating as per there directions..what can I expect..also a big Thank you to Scott for the,"brush tips"..have filed them away with my reference material for use..

SSACKLOW
03-27-2001, 12:19 PM
Peter..thank you for the reply and info..have one question..Why would you not use the gloss on the exterior..I have applied on exterior mahagony areas over the Marine Cetol coating as per there directions..what can I expect..also a big Thank you to Scott for the,"brush tips"..have filed them away with my reference material for use..

SSACKLOW
03-27-2001, 12:19 PM
Peter..thank you for the reply and info..have one question..Why would you not use the gloss on the exterior..I have applied on exterior mahagony areas over the Marine Cetol coating as per there directions..what can I expect..also a big Thank you to Scott for the,"brush tips"..have filed them away with my reference material for use..

Bob Cleek
03-28-2001, 12:42 AM
Sikkens sucks unless you have a taste for orange colored teak. Use CPES and varnish, or go for broke with Smith's two part urethane varnish. I tried oiling years ago. It stinks. Tons of work. The oil doesn't hold up in the sun and collects all sorts of dirt. Looks like crap is six weeks. Get into varnishing or give up on wooden boats.

Bob Cleek
03-28-2001, 12:42 AM
Sikkens sucks unless you have a taste for orange colored teak. Use CPES and varnish, or go for broke with Smith's two part urethane varnish. I tried oiling years ago. It stinks. Tons of work. The oil doesn't hold up in the sun and collects all sorts of dirt. Looks like crap is six weeks. Get into varnishing or give up on wooden boats.

Bob Cleek
03-28-2001, 12:42 AM
Sikkens sucks unless you have a taste for orange colored teak. Use CPES and varnish, or go for broke with Smith's two part urethane varnish. I tried oiling years ago. It stinks. Tons of work. The oil doesn't hold up in the sun and collects all sorts of dirt. Looks like crap is six weeks. Get into varnishing or give up on wooden boats.

Jeff Kelety
04-03-2001, 12:28 AM
Cleek says, "Get into varnishing or give up on wooden boats."

Something to this, I think. I acquired a 50 year old folkboat with years of Cetol and various assorted "stuff" layered onto her lovely iroko bright work. I took to scraping and varnishing, just like the good book says, and what a radiant jewel she became. It's not always a simple choice of sailing or varnishing. Sometimes the sailing is more satisfying because of the work, because of the deep, rich, chocolaty sheen of old wood sparkling against the water. It's quite a feeling. When I sail, I don't just watch for the wind, I watch each curve of the boat, each liquid reflection of the ocean in the finish and sweep of her lines. I would never get that from a Cetol finish.

Jeff

Jeff Kelety
04-03-2001, 12:28 AM
Cleek says, "Get into varnishing or give up on wooden boats."

Something to this, I think. I acquired a 50 year old folkboat with years of Cetol and various assorted "stuff" layered onto her lovely iroko bright work. I took to scraping and varnishing, just like the good book says, and what a radiant jewel she became. It's not always a simple choice of sailing or varnishing. Sometimes the sailing is more satisfying because of the work, because of the deep, rich, chocolaty sheen of old wood sparkling against the water. It's quite a feeling. When I sail, I don't just watch for the wind, I watch each curve of the boat, each liquid reflection of the ocean in the finish and sweep of her lines. I would never get that from a Cetol finish.

Jeff

Jeff Kelety
04-03-2001, 12:28 AM
Cleek says, "Get into varnishing or give up on wooden boats."

Something to this, I think. I acquired a 50 year old folkboat with years of Cetol and various assorted "stuff" layered onto her lovely iroko bright work. I took to scraping and varnishing, just like the good book says, and what a radiant jewel she became. It's not always a simple choice of sailing or varnishing. Sometimes the sailing is more satisfying because of the work, because of the deep, rich, chocolaty sheen of old wood sparkling against the water. It's quite a feeling. When I sail, I don't just watch for the wind, I watch each curve of the boat, each liquid reflection of the ocean in the finish and sweep of her lines. I would never get that from a Cetol finish.

Jeff

gashmore
04-03-2001, 07:48 AM
Ah, yes, I read that book. "Zin and the Art of Sailboat Maintenance."

gashmore
04-03-2001, 07:48 AM
Ah, yes, I read that book. "Zin and the Art of Sailboat Maintenance."

gashmore
04-03-2001, 07:48 AM
Ah, yes, I read that book. "Zin and the Art of Sailboat Maintenance."

Scott Rosen
04-03-2001, 09:33 AM
Ah, Jeff. Truer words were never spoken.

Scott Rosen
04-03-2001, 09:33 AM
Ah, Jeff. Truer words were never spoken.

Scott Rosen
04-03-2001, 09:33 AM
Ah, Jeff. Truer words were never spoken.