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Todd Schliemann
09-12-2000, 11:55 PM
Anyone have a suggestion for the proper oil for solid 3/4" below decks teak sole? Something to complement the salad oil, diesel, bubble gum and plague infested stuff that comes with the territory. The general tone here is that darker is better. There are some sections that are drying out and others ... well that are well intoxicated. I have cleaned, and bleached out the worst and it looks reasonable but now I need to go over the whole thing. They were previously varnished but oil is the thing now.

[This message has been edited by Todd Schliemann (edited 09-13-2000).]

Todd Schliemann
09-12-2000, 11:55 PM
Anyone have a suggestion for the proper oil for solid 3/4" below decks teak sole? Something to complement the salad oil, diesel, bubble gum and plague infested stuff that comes with the territory. The general tone here is that darker is better. There are some sections that are drying out and others ... well that are well intoxicated. I have cleaned, and bleached out the worst and it looks reasonable but now I need to go over the whole thing. They were previously varnished but oil is the thing now.

[This message has been edited by Todd Schliemann (edited 09-13-2000).]

Todd Schliemann
09-12-2000, 11:55 PM
Anyone have a suggestion for the proper oil for solid 3/4" below decks teak sole? Something to complement the salad oil, diesel, bubble gum and plague infested stuff that comes with the territory. The general tone here is that darker is better. There are some sections that are drying out and others ... well that are well intoxicated. I have cleaned, and bleached out the worst and it looks reasonable but now I need to go over the whole thing. They were previously varnished but oil is the thing now.

[This message has been edited by Todd Schliemann (edited 09-13-2000).]

Ian Wright
09-13-2000, 05:43 AM
Find real full strength Tung oil.
After cleaning, bleaching and sanding, put on three or four coats wet on wet. Then before it dries, (after it has soaked in for an hour or three) wipe over the surface with a turpentine soaked rag. Take as much of the tung oil off as you can.
Result,,,,, non slip oiled wood .
Do NOT use this system outside the cabin, it won't last.

IanW

Ian Wright
09-13-2000, 05:43 AM
Find real full strength Tung oil.
After cleaning, bleaching and sanding, put on three or four coats wet on wet. Then before it dries, (after it has soaked in for an hour or three) wipe over the surface with a turpentine soaked rag. Take as much of the tung oil off as you can.
Result,,,,, non slip oiled wood .
Do NOT use this system outside the cabin, it won't last.

IanW

Ian Wright
09-13-2000, 05:43 AM
Find real full strength Tung oil.
After cleaning, bleaching and sanding, put on three or four coats wet on wet. Then before it dries, (after it has soaked in for an hour or three) wipe over the surface with a turpentine soaked rag. Take as much of the tung oil off as you can.
Result,,,,, non slip oiled wood .
Do NOT use this system outside the cabin, it won't last.

IanW

Gary Bergman
09-13-2000, 08:32 AM
I've been using some inexpensive, citrus based 'orange oil' on my teak sole.Not fancy, definitely not long lasting{ a coat every two weeks} but also not harmful or permanent. Looks great, smells great, and my teak is no longer dry. I apply it after vacuuming, and it takes about 5 minutes.

Gary Bergman
09-13-2000, 08:32 AM
I've been using some inexpensive, citrus based 'orange oil' on my teak sole.Not fancy, definitely not long lasting{ a coat every two weeks} but also not harmful or permanent. Looks great, smells great, and my teak is no longer dry. I apply it after vacuuming, and it takes about 5 minutes.

Gary Bergman
09-13-2000, 08:32 AM
I've been using some inexpensive, citrus based 'orange oil' on my teak sole.Not fancy, definitely not long lasting{ a coat every two weeks} but also not harmful or permanent. Looks great, smells great, and my teak is no longer dry. I apply it after vacuuming, and it takes about 5 minutes.

Todd Schliemann
09-18-2000, 10:27 PM
Yes, of course, tung oil, thank you Ian. Think I might dilute the first application with turpentine to see where the bad dark spots are, then continue if it looks good. I think you have my sole in mind, full strength- soaked till dark.

Gary, the thought of doing my sole every two weeks is daunting. What is this "orange oil" and can you just mop it on when one cleans?
Thanks again and fair winds.

Todd Schliemann
09-18-2000, 10:27 PM
Yes, of course, tung oil, thank you Ian. Think I might dilute the first application with turpentine to see where the bad dark spots are, then continue if it looks good. I think you have my sole in mind, full strength- soaked till dark.

Gary, the thought of doing my sole every two weeks is daunting. What is this "orange oil" and can you just mop it on when one cleans?
Thanks again and fair winds.

Todd Schliemann
09-18-2000, 10:27 PM
Yes, of course, tung oil, thank you Ian. Think I might dilute the first application with turpentine to see where the bad dark spots are, then continue if it looks good. I think you have my sole in mind, full strength- soaked till dark.

Gary, the thought of doing my sole every two weeks is daunting. What is this "orange oil" and can you just mop it on when one cleans?
Thanks again and fair winds.

Ian Wright
09-19-2000, 05:55 AM
Tod,
Just wipe it over with turps neat to see what it will look like after oiling. Then you can re-bleach or re-sand without oil getting in the way.
Btw, if you needa darker oil finish look for a product called "Varnol",a Swedish varnishing oil, and follow the instructions on the can. I've been trialing it for three or four years and, imho, it's the best of the 'Oil' products that I have found.

IanW

Ian Wright
09-19-2000, 05:55 AM
Tod,
Just wipe it over with turps neat to see what it will look like after oiling. Then you can re-bleach or re-sand without oil getting in the way.
Btw, if you needa darker oil finish look for a product called "Varnol",a Swedish varnishing oil, and follow the instructions on the can. I've been trialing it for three or four years and, imho, it's the best of the 'Oil' products that I have found.

IanW

Ian Wright
09-19-2000, 05:55 AM
Tod,
Just wipe it over with turps neat to see what it will look like after oiling. Then you can re-bleach or re-sand without oil getting in the way.
Btw, if you needa darker oil finish look for a product called "Varnol",a Swedish varnishing oil, and follow the instructions on the can. I've been trialing it for three or four years and, imho, it's the best of the 'Oil' products that I have found.

IanW

Gary Bergman
09-19-2000, 08:28 AM
The citrus oil is marketed thru a number of large retail outlets. I got mine from 'Home Depot'. It doesn't take but a minute or 5 to apply, I use a rag, but I guess you could mop it. I'm already on hands and knees as my vacuum is a small 'dust buster'

Gary Bergman
09-19-2000, 08:28 AM
The citrus oil is marketed thru a number of large retail outlets. I got mine from 'Home Depot'. It doesn't take but a minute or 5 to apply, I use a rag, but I guess you could mop it. I'm already on hands and knees as my vacuum is a small 'dust buster'

Gary Bergman
09-19-2000, 08:28 AM
The citrus oil is marketed thru a number of large retail outlets. I got mine from 'Home Depot'. It doesn't take but a minute or 5 to apply, I use a rag, but I guess you could mop it. I'm already on hands and knees as my vacuum is a small 'dust buster'

Scott Rosen
09-27-2000, 12:17 PM
I'm not a big fan of oil finishes because they wear quickly and stain easily. I like varnish. It can get a little slippery when wet, but a good pair of boat shoes solves the problem for me. Todd, if you really want the ultimate, apply the Tung oil as Ian suggests and then apply a few coats of varnish over that.

When I was a kid, we had an oiled teak cabin sole. One day when my dad was changing the crankcase oil, he spilled the bucket of dirty oil on the sole. When he finally stopped trying to bleach out the crankcase oil (three weeks later), he had to declare defeat and we all learned to live with the funny-shaped stain.

The best non-skid is a sole along the lines of a traditional teak sole with raised holly inlays. It wouldn't be difficult to cut the kerfs and glue in the inlays. You wouldn't have to use holly, either. Teak on teak might even look better to my eye. Sure would look good with a varnish finish, and would impress the neighbors, too.

Scott Rosen
09-27-2000, 12:17 PM
I'm not a big fan of oil finishes because they wear quickly and stain easily. I like varnish. It can get a little slippery when wet, but a good pair of boat shoes solves the problem for me. Todd, if you really want the ultimate, apply the Tung oil as Ian suggests and then apply a few coats of varnish over that.

When I was a kid, we had an oiled teak cabin sole. One day when my dad was changing the crankcase oil, he spilled the bucket of dirty oil on the sole. When he finally stopped trying to bleach out the crankcase oil (three weeks later), he had to declare defeat and we all learned to live with the funny-shaped stain.

The best non-skid is a sole along the lines of a traditional teak sole with raised holly inlays. It wouldn't be difficult to cut the kerfs and glue in the inlays. You wouldn't have to use holly, either. Teak on teak might even look better to my eye. Sure would look good with a varnish finish, and would impress the neighbors, too.

Scott Rosen
09-27-2000, 12:17 PM
I'm not a big fan of oil finishes because they wear quickly and stain easily. I like varnish. It can get a little slippery when wet, but a good pair of boat shoes solves the problem for me. Todd, if you really want the ultimate, apply the Tung oil as Ian suggests and then apply a few coats of varnish over that.

When I was a kid, we had an oiled teak cabin sole. One day when my dad was changing the crankcase oil, he spilled the bucket of dirty oil on the sole. When he finally stopped trying to bleach out the crankcase oil (three weeks later), he had to declare defeat and we all learned to live with the funny-shaped stain.

The best non-skid is a sole along the lines of a traditional teak sole with raised holly inlays. It wouldn't be difficult to cut the kerfs and glue in the inlays. You wouldn't have to use holly, either. Teak on teak might even look better to my eye. Sure would look good with a varnish finish, and would impress the neighbors, too.

Ed Nye
09-28-2000, 01:17 AM
I remember one very long single-handed sail back to the marina and losing a lot of sailing one summer to a oiled teak sole and some water down the companion way. It took six weeks to get the cast off. Mine gets washed with soap, water and some clorox.
Ed

Ed Nye
09-28-2000, 01:17 AM
I remember one very long single-handed sail back to the marina and losing a lot of sailing one summer to a oiled teak sole and some water down the companion way. It took six weeks to get the cast off. Mine gets washed with soap, water and some clorox.
Ed

Ed Nye
09-28-2000, 01:17 AM
I remember one very long single-handed sail back to the marina and losing a lot of sailing one summer to a oiled teak sole and some water down the companion way. It took six weeks to get the cast off. Mine gets washed with soap, water and some clorox.
Ed

Charlie J
09-28-2000, 08:14 AM
Ed - I remember lying flat on my back on the varnished teak and holly cabin sole after hitting a spot of water when I popped down to check a chart. The boat was under full sail and the helm was --up there all alone. The next day I stripped the varnish and oiled - never slipped again.

I don't guess there is an easy answer to this one huh?

Charlie J
09-28-2000, 08:14 AM
Ed - I remember lying flat on my back on the varnished teak and holly cabin sole after hitting a spot of water when I popped down to check a chart. The boat was under full sail and the helm was --up there all alone. The next day I stripped the varnish and oiled - never slipped again.

I don't guess there is an easy answer to this one huh?

Charlie J
09-28-2000, 08:14 AM
Ed - I remember lying flat on my back on the varnished teak and holly cabin sole after hitting a spot of water when I popped down to check a chart. The boat was under full sail and the helm was --up there all alone. The next day I stripped the varnish and oiled - never slipped again.

I don't guess there is an easy answer to this one huh?

Mike Field
09-28-2000, 09:31 AM
And speaking of teak-and-holly, we have a marine ply out here that has this as a face veneer -- teak about 2" wide separated by holly of about 1/8" Looks fine, and would be a ****ed sight easier to lay than the real thing.

BTW....
The asterisks weren't in the original post -- they were put in by a person, persons, or program unknown. The letters replaced were d, a, m, and n -- surely not constituting a four-letter word requiring censoring?

[This message has been edited by Mike Field (edited 09-28-2000).]

Mike Field
09-28-2000, 09:31 AM
And speaking of teak-and-holly, we have a marine ply out here that has this as a face veneer -- teak about 2" wide separated by holly of about 1/8" Looks fine, and would be a ****ed sight easier to lay than the real thing.

BTW....
The asterisks weren't in the original post -- they were put in by a person, persons, or program unknown. The letters replaced were d, a, m, and n -- surely not constituting a four-letter word requiring censoring?

[This message has been edited by Mike Field (edited 09-28-2000).]

Mike Field
09-28-2000, 09:31 AM
And speaking of teak-and-holly, we have a marine ply out here that has this as a face veneer -- teak about 2" wide separated by holly of about 1/8" Looks fine, and would be a ****ed sight easier to lay than the real thing.

BTW....
The asterisks weren't in the original post -- they were put in by a person, persons, or program unknown. The letters replaced were d, a, m, and n -- surely not constituting a four-letter word requiring censoring?

[This message has been edited by Mike Field (edited 09-28-2000).]

Ross Miller
09-28-2000, 10:09 AM
No ****, Sherlock. Meet the net nanny.

Ross Miller
09-28-2000, 10:09 AM
No ****, Sherlock. Meet the net nanny.

Ross Miller
09-28-2000, 10:09 AM
No ****, Sherlock. Meet the net nanny.

Todd Schliemann
09-29-2000, 04:53 PM
Many good thoughts. My boat ain't going to win the cours d'elequance for finish so a nice, warm dark cabin sole is fine. The darkness helps cover the staining, which is a matter of course. Previously it was varnished and scratched terribly as well as being slippery. I've spilled considerable amounts of every sort of thing on the oiled version and it justs adds to the patina - nice, warm, and worn in. I'm on my way and it looks good before sanding so ... by the way I was surprised when "Jackass" slipped through. Nice word, "Jackass." Carries way in a breeze if needed.

Todd Schliemann
09-29-2000, 04:53 PM
Many good thoughts. My boat ain't going to win the cours d'elequance for finish so a nice, warm dark cabin sole is fine. The darkness helps cover the staining, which is a matter of course. Previously it was varnished and scratched terribly as well as being slippery. I've spilled considerable amounts of every sort of thing on the oiled version and it justs adds to the patina - nice, warm, and worn in. I'm on my way and it looks good before sanding so ... by the way I was surprised when "Jackass" slipped through. Nice word, "Jackass." Carries way in a breeze if needed.

Todd Schliemann
09-29-2000, 04:53 PM
Many good thoughts. My boat ain't going to win the cours d'elequance for finish so a nice, warm dark cabin sole is fine. The darkness helps cover the staining, which is a matter of course. Previously it was varnished and scratched terribly as well as being slippery. I've spilled considerable amounts of every sort of thing on the oiled version and it justs adds to the patina - nice, warm, and worn in. I'm on my way and it looks good before sanding so ... by the way I was surprised when "Jackass" slipped through. Nice word, "Jackass." Carries way in a breeze if needed.

TimScearce
09-29-2000, 04:59 PM
I pulled as many of the 3/4" teak planks out of my cabin sole as I could and took them home. I sanded them down, soaked in CPES and applied 8 coats of Interlux Rubbed Effect Varnish. The rest I did on the boat. It's held up great for 2 years now.

I am very pleased with the results and have not slipped yet. The rubbed effect look is very understated.

Just another thought.

TimScearce
09-29-2000, 04:59 PM
I pulled as many of the 3/4" teak planks out of my cabin sole as I could and took them home. I sanded them down, soaked in CPES and applied 8 coats of Interlux Rubbed Effect Varnish. The rest I did on the boat. It's held up great for 2 years now.

I am very pleased with the results and have not slipped yet. The rubbed effect look is very understated.

Just another thought.

TimScearce
09-29-2000, 04:59 PM
I pulled as many of the 3/4" teak planks out of my cabin sole as I could and took them home. I sanded them down, soaked in CPES and applied 8 coats of Interlux Rubbed Effect Varnish. The rest I did on the boat. It's held up great for 2 years now.

I am very pleased with the results and have not slipped yet. The rubbed effect look is very understated.

Just another thought.

Scott Rosen
10-03-2000, 02:30 PM
There are a lot of misunderstandings about teak and holly soles, caused mostly by the proliferation of the veneered plywood soles seen in production 'glass boats. Those soles are imposters. They bear no resemblence, living or dead, to a REAL teak and holly sole.

The veneers are a joke. On a real teak and holly sole, the holly stands up proud at least a quarter inch, so you get a "ribbed" sole. Those ribs are what prevent you from slipping. They work better than just about anything else you can use, and it doesn't matter if they're varnished, oiled or left bare. (Although the holly will stain if left bare.) The concept is to create a sole with real traction. You don't need to use holly. You could use teak on teak if you wanted a uniform color.

Not that I'm a snob about this (which I am), but when I go into a boat and see that veneer, it makes me sneer.

Scott Rosen
10-03-2000, 02:30 PM
There are a lot of misunderstandings about teak and holly soles, caused mostly by the proliferation of the veneered plywood soles seen in production 'glass boats. Those soles are imposters. They bear no resemblence, living or dead, to a REAL teak and holly sole.

The veneers are a joke. On a real teak and holly sole, the holly stands up proud at least a quarter inch, so you get a "ribbed" sole. Those ribs are what prevent you from slipping. They work better than just about anything else you can use, and it doesn't matter if they're varnished, oiled or left bare. (Although the holly will stain if left bare.) The concept is to create a sole with real traction. You don't need to use holly. You could use teak on teak if you wanted a uniform color.

Not that I'm a snob about this (which I am), but when I go into a boat and see that veneer, it makes me sneer.

Scott Rosen
10-03-2000, 02:30 PM
There are a lot of misunderstandings about teak and holly soles, caused mostly by the proliferation of the veneered plywood soles seen in production 'glass boats. Those soles are imposters. They bear no resemblence, living or dead, to a REAL teak and holly sole.

The veneers are a joke. On a real teak and holly sole, the holly stands up proud at least a quarter inch, so you get a "ribbed" sole. Those ribs are what prevent you from slipping. They work better than just about anything else you can use, and it doesn't matter if they're varnished, oiled or left bare. (Although the holly will stain if left bare.) The concept is to create a sole with real traction. You don't need to use holly. You could use teak on teak if you wanted a uniform color.

Not that I'm a snob about this (which I am), but when I go into a boat and see that veneer, it makes me sneer.

jkelety
10-22-2000, 01:19 AM
Great thread on teak sole finishes, gentlemen.

I have new 3/4 teak on my Folkboat. Have wanted to apply a finish - the rubbed Interlux had caught my fancy - but I am getting moisture from beneath in the corners of the sole. So the question: do I need to solve the mositure seepage on the sole first before applying any finish, oil or otherwise? It's a pretty tall order to solve the moisture. Could mean raising the sole (like there's too much headroom in a Folkboat <g> ) or re-fastening. It's no problem pumping her every other week or so, but I would really like to seal the teak. Thoughts?

Jeff

jkelety
10-22-2000, 01:19 AM
Great thread on teak sole finishes, gentlemen.

I have new 3/4 teak on my Folkboat. Have wanted to apply a finish - the rubbed Interlux had caught my fancy - but I am getting moisture from beneath in the corners of the sole. So the question: do I need to solve the mositure seepage on the sole first before applying any finish, oil or otherwise? It's a pretty tall order to solve the moisture. Could mean raising the sole (like there's too much headroom in a Folkboat <g> ) or re-fastening. It's no problem pumping her every other week or so, but I would really like to seal the teak. Thoughts?

Jeff

jkelety
10-22-2000, 01:19 AM
Great thread on teak sole finishes, gentlemen.

I have new 3/4 teak on my Folkboat. Have wanted to apply a finish - the rubbed Interlux had caught my fancy - but I am getting moisture from beneath in the corners of the sole. So the question: do I need to solve the mositure seepage on the sole first before applying any finish, oil or otherwise? It's a pretty tall order to solve the moisture. Could mean raising the sole (like there's too much headroom in a Folkboat <g> ) or re-fastening. It's no problem pumping her every other week or so, but I would really like to seal the teak. Thoughts?

Jeff