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rebel5357
01-13-2001, 09:10 PM
can you send the plans to the craftsman 8" direct drive saw, so i can try to fix it. the motor trys to run to the rotor won't turn.
thank you,
gary searle.

rebel5357
01-13-2001, 09:10 PM
can you send the plans to the craftsman 8" direct drive saw, so i can try to fix it. the motor trys to run to the rotor won't turn.
thank you,
gary searle.

rebel5357
01-13-2001, 09:10 PM
can you send the plans to the craftsman 8" direct drive saw, so i can try to fix it. the motor trys to run to the rotor won't turn.
thank you,
gary searle.

Frank Hagan
01-13-2001, 10:09 PM
Hey Gary, not sure who here would have plans to the Craftsman direct drive saw. But you might check to see if the motor has a start capacitor on it, usually housed in a little "dog house" on top of the motor casing. If the start capacitor is blown, sometimes the motor will just sit there and buzz and act like its trying to start. You can also turn it on, and, using something inanimate (that doesn't bleed!)like a stick, try spinning the blade. If it takes off running, it could be the start capacitor.

You can unplug the thing and remove the start capacitor, being carful not to ground yourself across the terminals (just in case there's still a charge there ... it stores enough juice to help the motor get started or to knock you on your backsides if its good.) You'll see some markings on it ... voltage and then a "micro farad" rating. The voltage rating is usually noted with a "V" or "VAC" behind it, and the micro farad rating is usually a weird looking "uf" type of symbol. With that voltage rating and the micro farad rating you can go to a motor supply store or electronics store and buy a replacement for a few bucks.

Just a wild guess. The motor could also be burned up, but usually you'll smell that distinctive burned windings smell (all my motor burn ups have been rather spectacular, with copious quanitity of choking smoke, sparks, even a fire one time.)

Frank Hagan
01-13-2001, 10:09 PM
Hey Gary, not sure who here would have plans to the Craftsman direct drive saw. But you might check to see if the motor has a start capacitor on it, usually housed in a little "dog house" on top of the motor casing. If the start capacitor is blown, sometimes the motor will just sit there and buzz and act like its trying to start. You can also turn it on, and, using something inanimate (that doesn't bleed!)like a stick, try spinning the blade. If it takes off running, it could be the start capacitor.

You can unplug the thing and remove the start capacitor, being carful not to ground yourself across the terminals (just in case there's still a charge there ... it stores enough juice to help the motor get started or to knock you on your backsides if its good.) You'll see some markings on it ... voltage and then a "micro farad" rating. The voltage rating is usually noted with a "V" or "VAC" behind it, and the micro farad rating is usually a weird looking "uf" type of symbol. With that voltage rating and the micro farad rating you can go to a motor supply store or electronics store and buy a replacement for a few bucks.

Just a wild guess. The motor could also be burned up, but usually you'll smell that distinctive burned windings smell (all my motor burn ups have been rather spectacular, with copious quanitity of choking smoke, sparks, even a fire one time.)

Frank Hagan
01-13-2001, 10:09 PM
Hey Gary, not sure who here would have plans to the Craftsman direct drive saw. But you might check to see if the motor has a start capacitor on it, usually housed in a little "dog house" on top of the motor casing. If the start capacitor is blown, sometimes the motor will just sit there and buzz and act like its trying to start. You can also turn it on, and, using something inanimate (that doesn't bleed!)like a stick, try spinning the blade. If it takes off running, it could be the start capacitor.

You can unplug the thing and remove the start capacitor, being carful not to ground yourself across the terminals (just in case there's still a charge there ... it stores enough juice to help the motor get started or to knock you on your backsides if its good.) You'll see some markings on it ... voltage and then a "micro farad" rating. The voltage rating is usually noted with a "V" or "VAC" behind it, and the micro farad rating is usually a weird looking "uf" type of symbol. With that voltage rating and the micro farad rating you can go to a motor supply store or electronics store and buy a replacement for a few bucks.

Just a wild guess. The motor could also be burned up, but usually you'll smell that distinctive burned windings smell (all my motor burn ups have been rather spectacular, with copious quanitity of choking smoke, sparks, even a fire one time.)

Bob Cleek
01-14-2001, 03:14 PM
Sure sounds like a dead capacitor. I had one on one of my Craftsman 1950's era motors. They are in the base plate under the motor, not in a pod on top like the newer motors. Unfortunately, it was one of the old fashioned paper, wax, tinfoil and oil capacitors. (Probably full of PCB's... dunno) I was able to get a replacement that fit in the bottom of the motor from the local electronics parts store. Just bring in the old one. It should have the specs on it. BTW, one way to know for sure is to give the motor a spin. The capacitor gives it a "kick" to get it turning. You can wrap a length of line over the shaft, flick the switch and then pull the line evenly and quickly. If it's the capacitor that's out, the motor will run as soon as it gets some initial speed from the rip cord. Use yer head, of course... make sure it's turning the right way. Don't wrap the bitter end of the cord around your hand so if it catches on something it won't pull your fist into the saw... dumb stuff like that.

Bob Cleek
01-14-2001, 03:14 PM
Sure sounds like a dead capacitor. I had one on one of my Craftsman 1950's era motors. They are in the base plate under the motor, not in a pod on top like the newer motors. Unfortunately, it was one of the old fashioned paper, wax, tinfoil and oil capacitors. (Probably full of PCB's... dunno) I was able to get a replacement that fit in the bottom of the motor from the local electronics parts store. Just bring in the old one. It should have the specs on it. BTW, one way to know for sure is to give the motor a spin. The capacitor gives it a "kick" to get it turning. You can wrap a length of line over the shaft, flick the switch and then pull the line evenly and quickly. If it's the capacitor that's out, the motor will run as soon as it gets some initial speed from the rip cord. Use yer head, of course... make sure it's turning the right way. Don't wrap the bitter end of the cord around your hand so if it catches on something it won't pull your fist into the saw... dumb stuff like that.

Bob Cleek
01-14-2001, 03:14 PM
Sure sounds like a dead capacitor. I had one on one of my Craftsman 1950's era motors. They are in the base plate under the motor, not in a pod on top like the newer motors. Unfortunately, it was one of the old fashioned paper, wax, tinfoil and oil capacitors. (Probably full of PCB's... dunno) I was able to get a replacement that fit in the bottom of the motor from the local electronics parts store. Just bring in the old one. It should have the specs on it. BTW, one way to know for sure is to give the motor a spin. The capacitor gives it a "kick" to get it turning. You can wrap a length of line over the shaft, flick the switch and then pull the line evenly and quickly. If it's the capacitor that's out, the motor will run as soon as it gets some initial speed from the rip cord. Use yer head, of course... make sure it's turning the right way. Don't wrap the bitter end of the cord around your hand so if it catches on something it won't pull your fist into the saw... dumb stuff like that.

Charlie J
01-14-2001, 09:33 PM
you might even consider removing the blade BEFORE you try spinning the motor. Much safer that way http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

Charlie J
01-14-2001, 09:33 PM
you might even consider removing the blade BEFORE you try spinning the motor. Much safer that way http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

Charlie J
01-14-2001, 09:33 PM
you might even consider removing the blade BEFORE you try spinning the motor. Much safer that way http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

PilotArt
01-15-2001, 05:01 AM
Thank you all!! http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

Sounds like what must be ailing my old Skil Saw. http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/frown.gif http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/frown.gif http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/frown.gif

1947, age of four, I watched skilled craftsman installing Red Wood Storm Shutters with the wonderful Skil Saw. Their lunch break, and I was caught just before pulling the trigger with a little scrap of wood on the blade. :O :O :O I still have an incredible fear of power tools.

Art

PS: Notice that a lot of the 'Ultimate Smilies' aren't functional anymore. http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif As well as the Email Notification Service. Still no doubt, the best Forum Engine around!


[This message has been edited by PilotArt (edited 01-15-2001).]

PilotArt
01-15-2001, 05:01 AM
Thank you all!! http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

Sounds like what must be ailing my old Skil Saw. http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/frown.gif http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/frown.gif http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/frown.gif

1947, age of four, I watched skilled craftsman installing Red Wood Storm Shutters with the wonderful Skil Saw. Their lunch break, and I was caught just before pulling the trigger with a little scrap of wood on the blade. :O :O :O I still have an incredible fear of power tools.

Art

PS: Notice that a lot of the 'Ultimate Smilies' aren't functional anymore. http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif As well as the Email Notification Service. Still no doubt, the best Forum Engine around!


[This message has been edited by PilotArt (edited 01-15-2001).]

PilotArt
01-15-2001, 05:01 AM
Thank you all!! http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

Sounds like what must be ailing my old Skil Saw. http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/frown.gif http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/frown.gif http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/frown.gif

1947, age of four, I watched skilled craftsman installing Red Wood Storm Shutters with the wonderful Skil Saw. Their lunch break, and I was caught just before pulling the trigger with a little scrap of wood on the blade. :O :O :O I still have an incredible fear of power tools.

Art

PS: Notice that a lot of the 'Ultimate Smilies' aren't functional anymore. http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif As well as the Email Notification Service. Still no doubt, the best Forum Engine around!


[This message has been edited by PilotArt (edited 01-15-2001).]