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Pete Dorr
10-23-2003, 10:37 AM
I want to set up my basement as a fun zone. I don't have the time or money to stud out the walls next to the concrete walls. I'd rather just paint them and leave the few exposed pipes exposed. I will have to build the walls that will block off unfinished vs "finished" space. I plan on using the metal studs and sheetrock for these walls. I do have a full bath down there that I used the metal studs on.

What I do want to do is to cover the ceiling that's a step above the thin clear plastic sheeting I have now.

Back story - we lived in the basement for a couple of months while the house was being finished - that's why we have the full bath and plastic on the ceiling.

The drop ceiling may be the best bet as there are pipes and stuff that are are just below the joists.

Can anone recommend other ideas that would cost less than the drop ceiling but not be as crappy as plastic ?

The goal is to have the following in the basement:

pool table - currently have but not set up
climbing wall
tv watching area
skateboard mini ramp
computer for the kids
exersize machine space - have a stepper - want a rower

Any recommendations ?

No - you are not invited over to play smile.gif

Pete

Pete Dorr
10-23-2003, 10:37 AM
I want to set up my basement as a fun zone. I don't have the time or money to stud out the walls next to the concrete walls. I'd rather just paint them and leave the few exposed pipes exposed. I will have to build the walls that will block off unfinished vs "finished" space. I plan on using the metal studs and sheetrock for these walls. I do have a full bath down there that I used the metal studs on.

What I do want to do is to cover the ceiling that's a step above the thin clear plastic sheeting I have now.

Back story - we lived in the basement for a couple of months while the house was being finished - that's why we have the full bath and plastic on the ceiling.

The drop ceiling may be the best bet as there are pipes and stuff that are are just below the joists.

Can anone recommend other ideas that would cost less than the drop ceiling but not be as crappy as plastic ?

The goal is to have the following in the basement:

pool table - currently have but not set up
climbing wall
tv watching area
skateboard mini ramp
computer for the kids
exersize machine space - have a stepper - want a rower

Any recommendations ?

No - you are not invited over to play smile.gif

Pete

Pete Dorr
10-23-2003, 10:37 AM
I want to set up my basement as a fun zone. I don't have the time or money to stud out the walls next to the concrete walls. I'd rather just paint them and leave the few exposed pipes exposed. I will have to build the walls that will block off unfinished vs "finished" space. I plan on using the metal studs and sheetrock for these walls. I do have a full bath down there that I used the metal studs on.

What I do want to do is to cover the ceiling that's a step above the thin clear plastic sheeting I have now.

Back story - we lived in the basement for a couple of months while the house was being finished - that's why we have the full bath and plastic on the ceiling.

The drop ceiling may be the best bet as there are pipes and stuff that are are just below the joists.

Can anone recommend other ideas that would cost less than the drop ceiling but not be as crappy as plastic ?

The goal is to have the following in the basement:

pool table - currently have but not set up
climbing wall
tv watching area
skateboard mini ramp
computer for the kids
exersize machine space - have a stepper - want a rower

Any recommendations ?

No - you are not invited over to play smile.gif

Pete

Alan D. Hyde
10-23-2003, 10:55 AM
Tack canvas to the overhead joists with push-pins of the same color as the canvas.

Easy access to pipes, wiring, etc., combined with good looks, if you take a little care in tacking up the canvas so as to create an interesting but regular pattern.

We used navy-colored canvas and push-pins. With white walls and a relatively light-colored carpet, it isn't too dark...

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
10-23-2003, 10:55 AM
Tack canvas to the overhead joists with push-pins of the same color as the canvas.

Easy access to pipes, wiring, etc., combined with good looks, if you take a little care in tacking up the canvas so as to create an interesting but regular pattern.

We used navy-colored canvas and push-pins. With white walls and a relatively light-colored carpet, it isn't too dark...

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
10-23-2003, 10:55 AM
Tack canvas to the overhead joists with push-pins of the same color as the canvas.

Easy access to pipes, wiring, etc., combined with good looks, if you take a little care in tacking up the canvas so as to create an interesting but regular pattern.

We used navy-colored canvas and push-pins. With white walls and a relatively light-colored carpet, it isn't too dark...

Alan

imported_Steven Bauer
10-23-2003, 11:34 AM
What are you planning for the floor? Anything?
I'm doing my basement, too. I will be sheetrocking the walls using 1 5/8" metal studs. I like the fabric idea on the ceiling but I'd want something fire-resitant. This is what I'm putting down on the floor:

www.drilock.com (http://www.drilock.com)

They are 2' square tongue and groove panels of OSB with a dimpled polyethelene layer bonded to the underside of the panel. The dimples hold the 'wood' off the floor and create a vapor barrier. I've used them on customers basements and they seem great. They cost $4.99 each at Home Depot. And install very quickly.

Steven

imported_Steven Bauer
10-23-2003, 11:34 AM
What are you planning for the floor? Anything?
I'm doing my basement, too. I will be sheetrocking the walls using 1 5/8" metal studs. I like the fabric idea on the ceiling but I'd want something fire-resitant. This is what I'm putting down on the floor:

www.drilock.com (http://www.drilock.com)

They are 2' square tongue and groove panels of OSB with a dimpled polyethelene layer bonded to the underside of the panel. The dimples hold the 'wood' off the floor and create a vapor barrier. I've used them on customers basements and they seem great. They cost $4.99 each at Home Depot. And install very quickly.

Steven

imported_Steven Bauer
10-23-2003, 11:34 AM
What are you planning for the floor? Anything?
I'm doing my basement, too. I will be sheetrocking the walls using 1 5/8" metal studs. I like the fabric idea on the ceiling but I'd want something fire-resitant. This is what I'm putting down on the floor:

www.drilock.com (http://www.drilock.com)

They are 2' square tongue and groove panels of OSB with a dimpled polyethelene layer bonded to the underside of the panel. The dimples hold the 'wood' off the floor and create a vapor barrier. I've used them on customers basements and they seem great. They cost $4.99 each at Home Depot. And install very quickly.

Steven

Popeye
10-23-2003, 11:51 AM
Agree with steve to use FG batt insulation and 5/8" fire rated drywall (sheetrock- gyproc or gypsum board). This is a fire break + sound barrier and looks good on your insurance premium.

Otherwise, if cheap, use T&G panels, or even spanish cedar maybe, is great for mildew res.

Popeye
10-23-2003, 11:51 AM
Agree with steve to use FG batt insulation and 5/8" fire rated drywall (sheetrock- gyproc or gypsum board). This is a fire break + sound barrier and looks good on your insurance premium.

Otherwise, if cheap, use T&G panels, or even spanish cedar maybe, is great for mildew res.

Popeye
10-23-2003, 11:51 AM
Agree with steve to use FG batt insulation and 5/8" fire rated drywall (sheetrock- gyproc or gypsum board). This is a fire break + sound barrier and looks good on your insurance premium.

Otherwise, if cheap, use T&G panels, or even spanish cedar maybe, is great for mildew res.

whb
10-23-2003, 12:06 PM
I've seen some people use spray on plaster over everything. Joists, wiring, pipes. It looks not to bad and if you don't go really thick its not to hard to remove when repairs need to be done.

Howard

whb
10-23-2003, 12:06 PM
I've seen some people use spray on plaster over everything. Joists, wiring, pipes. It looks not to bad and if you don't go really thick its not to hard to remove when repairs need to be done.

Howard

whb
10-23-2003, 12:06 PM
I've seen some people use spray on plaster over everything. Joists, wiring, pipes. It looks not to bad and if you don't go really thick its not to hard to remove when repairs need to be done.

Howard

Pete Dorr
10-23-2003, 12:28 PM
The height is pretty close to 8', a better term would be bouldering wall where the goal is not height but to traverse - perhaps with some overhang for added difficulty. See what some other folks have done here (http://www.geocities.com/Yosemite/Trails/9640/database.html)

There is already insulation so I can't do the spraypaint or sprayplaster thing. If it was uninsulated I'd just leave it as is.

Was not planning anything for the floor as it is nice and smooth. Water coming in is a concern and did happen 1 time to a small portion of the floor so I'm reluctant to put anything down. The water did come in before final grading was done so that may not be a concern anymore but I'm not going to risk it.

To sheetrock the ceiling I'd need to build up the strapping about 4" to cover the lowest pipes - or just have a multi level ceiling which would not be bad either. I could be smart about access for future wiring or just not tape the joints so I could pull the sheetrock down as needed.

Thanks for the ideas so far - hopefully there will be more.

Pete Dorr
10-23-2003, 12:28 PM
The height is pretty close to 8', a better term would be bouldering wall where the goal is not height but to traverse - perhaps with some overhang for added difficulty. See what some other folks have done here (http://www.geocities.com/Yosemite/Trails/9640/database.html)

There is already insulation so I can't do the spraypaint or sprayplaster thing. If it was uninsulated I'd just leave it as is.

Was not planning anything for the floor as it is nice and smooth. Water coming in is a concern and did happen 1 time to a small portion of the floor so I'm reluctant to put anything down. The water did come in before final grading was done so that may not be a concern anymore but I'm not going to risk it.

To sheetrock the ceiling I'd need to build up the strapping about 4" to cover the lowest pipes - or just have a multi level ceiling which would not be bad either. I could be smart about access for future wiring or just not tape the joints so I could pull the sheetrock down as needed.

Thanks for the ideas so far - hopefully there will be more.

Pete Dorr
10-23-2003, 12:28 PM
The height is pretty close to 8', a better term would be bouldering wall where the goal is not height but to traverse - perhaps with some overhang for added difficulty. See what some other folks have done here (http://www.geocities.com/Yosemite/Trails/9640/database.html)

There is already insulation so I can't do the spraypaint or sprayplaster thing. If it was uninsulated I'd just leave it as is.

Was not planning anything for the floor as it is nice and smooth. Water coming in is a concern and did happen 1 time to a small portion of the floor so I'm reluctant to put anything down. The water did come in before final grading was done so that may not be a concern anymore but I'm not going to risk it.

To sheetrock the ceiling I'd need to build up the strapping about 4" to cover the lowest pipes - or just have a multi level ceiling which would not be bad either. I could be smart about access for future wiring or just not tape the joints so I could pull the sheetrock down as needed.

Thanks for the ideas so far - hopefully there will be more.

Alan D. Hyde
10-23-2003, 12:52 PM
Mildew resistant "marine" carpeting is available at less than $5/yard in many colors and styles.

Dampness or an occasional wetting will do it no harm.

It will not only make an area more attractive, but will also make it easier on the feet and legs...

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
10-23-2003, 12:52 PM
Mildew resistant "marine" carpeting is available at less than $5/yard in many colors and styles.

Dampness or an occasional wetting will do it no harm.

It will not only make an area more attractive, but will also make it easier on the feet and legs...

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
10-23-2003, 12:52 PM
Mildew resistant "marine" carpeting is available at less than $5/yard in many colors and styles.

Dampness or an occasional wetting will do it no harm.

It will not only make an area more attractive, but will also make it easier on the feet and legs...

Alan

Pete Dorr
10-24-2003, 09:09 AM
I just double checked the ceiling. It's mostly clear with a few pipes and heating ducts that could be boxed off.

Given this info I believe sheetrock might be a good choice (unless I do canvas).

Do I need to put the cross strapping up and then attach the sheetrock to that. My guess is that the cross strapping isolates some of the movement that the bigger pieces of wood do during the different seasons.

Pete Dorr
10-24-2003, 09:09 AM
I just double checked the ceiling. It's mostly clear with a few pipes and heating ducts that could be boxed off.

Given this info I believe sheetrock might be a good choice (unless I do canvas).

Do I need to put the cross strapping up and then attach the sheetrock to that. My guess is that the cross strapping isolates some of the movement that the bigger pieces of wood do during the different seasons.

Pete Dorr
10-24-2003, 09:09 AM
I just double checked the ceiling. It's mostly clear with a few pipes and heating ducts that could be boxed off.

Given this info I believe sheetrock might be a good choice (unless I do canvas).

Do I need to put the cross strapping up and then attach the sheetrock to that. My guess is that the cross strapping isolates some of the movement that the bigger pieces of wood do during the different seasons.

Bruce Hooke
10-24-2003, 09:20 AM
Just remember to allow access to any electrical junction boxes and plumbing shut-offs. As you may know, it is against code to block access to electrical junction boxes and, of course, there are times when plumbing shut-offs are both important and useful, including times when you may want to get at them in a hurry to shut off a leak.

Bruce Hooke
10-24-2003, 09:20 AM
Just remember to allow access to any electrical junction boxes and plumbing shut-offs. As you may know, it is against code to block access to electrical junction boxes and, of course, there are times when plumbing shut-offs are both important and useful, including times when you may want to get at them in a hurry to shut off a leak.

Bruce Hooke
10-24-2003, 09:20 AM
Just remember to allow access to any electrical junction boxes and plumbing shut-offs. As you may know, it is against code to block access to electrical junction boxes and, of course, there are times when plumbing shut-offs are both important and useful, including times when you may want to get at them in a hurry to shut off a leak.

Andreas Jordahl Rhude
10-24-2003, 09:29 AM
I like the fabric idea, cover the ceiling with canvas, a parachute, fabric from a sewing store... I am sure you could find some "playroom" appropriate fabrics that would be fun.

Another option is to paint everything on/in the ceiling black then put square edge boards up there, spaced about an inch apart. Use something like 1 x 2's or 1 x 3's. Paint 'em, stain 'em or just leave them natural.

Andreas Jordahl Rhude
10-24-2003, 09:29 AM
I like the fabric idea, cover the ceiling with canvas, a parachute, fabric from a sewing store... I am sure you could find some "playroom" appropriate fabrics that would be fun.

Another option is to paint everything on/in the ceiling black then put square edge boards up there, spaced about an inch apart. Use something like 1 x 2's or 1 x 3's. Paint 'em, stain 'em or just leave them natural.

Andreas Jordahl Rhude
10-24-2003, 09:29 AM
I like the fabric idea, cover the ceiling with canvas, a parachute, fabric from a sewing store... I am sure you could find some "playroom" appropriate fabrics that would be fun.

Another option is to paint everything on/in the ceiling black then put square edge boards up there, spaced about an inch apart. Use something like 1 x 2's or 1 x 3's. Paint 'em, stain 'em or just leave them natural.

cs
10-24-2003, 09:39 AM
Pete you could always suspend furring channels and sheetrock to that. That way you would have a smooth finished ceiling with no bump outs.

I'll see if I can find an image of one.

Chad

cs
10-24-2003, 09:39 AM
Pete you could always suspend furring channels and sheetrock to that. That way you would have a smooth finished ceiling with no bump outs.

I'll see if I can find an image of one.

Chad

cs
10-24-2003, 09:39 AM
Pete you could always suspend furring channels and sheetrock to that. That way you would have a smooth finished ceiling with no bump outs.

I'll see if I can find an image of one.

Chad

cs
10-24-2003, 09:54 AM
Here is an example:

http://www.kirii.com.hk/HD25/Hd-10-test.gif

What you do is hang a 1-1/2" channel at 48" c/c (max) from the structure above using an approved hanger wire. On to this channel you screw furring channels perpidicular at 24" c/c (max). Now you are ready to hang gyp board.

Chad

cs
10-24-2003, 09:54 AM
Here is an example:

http://www.kirii.com.hk/HD25/Hd-10-test.gif

What you do is hang a 1-1/2" channel at 48" c/c (max) from the structure above using an approved hanger wire. On to this channel you screw furring channels perpidicular at 24" c/c (max). Now you are ready to hang gyp board.

Chad

cs
10-24-2003, 09:54 AM
Here is an example:

http://www.kirii.com.hk/HD25/Hd-10-test.gif

What you do is hang a 1-1/2" channel at 48" c/c (max) from the structure above using an approved hanger wire. On to this channel you screw furring channels perpidicular at 24" c/c (max). Now you are ready to hang gyp board.

Chad

Popeye
10-24-2003, 11:46 AM
this is a suspended drywall ceiling? how do you finish the edges twds the walls?

Popeye
10-24-2003, 11:46 AM
this is a suspended drywall ceiling? how do you finish the edges twds the walls?

Popeye
10-24-2003, 11:46 AM
this is a suspended drywall ceiling? how do you finish the edges twds the walls?

cs
10-24-2003, 12:03 PM
A channel is ran on the perimater walls to fasten the gyp board to. Once this is installed it is a rigid ceiling system and can even be installed to meet UL fire restiance ratings.

Chad

cs
10-24-2003, 12:03 PM
A channel is ran on the perimater walls to fasten the gyp board to. Once this is installed it is a rigid ceiling system and can even be installed to meet UL fire restiance ratings.

Chad

cs
10-24-2003, 12:03 PM
A channel is ran on the perimater walls to fasten the gyp board to. Once this is installed it is a rigid ceiling system and can even be installed to meet UL fire restiance ratings.

Chad

Popeye
10-24-2003, 12:15 PM
not bad.

sound deadening, fire rated, insulated, handles expansion, easy ,cheap, quick to install, handles pipes, elec and ductwork. and looks good.

[ 10-24-2003, 01:18 PM: Message edited by: popeye ]

Popeye
10-24-2003, 12:15 PM
not bad.

sound deadening, fire rated, insulated, handles expansion, easy ,cheap, quick to install, handles pipes, elec and ductwork. and looks good.

[ 10-24-2003, 01:18 PM: Message edited by: popeye ]

Popeye
10-24-2003, 12:15 PM
not bad.

sound deadening, fire rated, insulated, handles expansion, easy ,cheap, quick to install, handles pipes, elec and ductwork. and looks good.

[ 10-24-2003, 01:18 PM: Message edited by: popeye ]

Ed Harrow
10-24-2003, 04:46 PM
Comment. My shop area, which is largely above grade, is uncomfortably cold even when the internal air temp is reasonable, when it is a bit chilly outside. As the winter progresses, and the concrete reaches thermal equilibrium, it really sucks the heat right out of me. I won't even talk about the floor. Even in the front, "finished" section, where our Glenwood Home Grand is pouring out the BTUs, the tile floor is most unpleasant.

Ed Harrow
10-24-2003, 04:46 PM
Comment. My shop area, which is largely above grade, is uncomfortably cold even when the internal air temp is reasonable, when it is a bit chilly outside. As the winter progresses, and the concrete reaches thermal equilibrium, it really sucks the heat right out of me. I won't even talk about the floor. Even in the front, "finished" section, where our Glenwood Home Grand is pouring out the BTUs, the tile floor is most unpleasant.

Ed Harrow
10-24-2003, 04:46 PM
Comment. My shop area, which is largely above grade, is uncomfortably cold even when the internal air temp is reasonable, when it is a bit chilly outside. As the winter progresses, and the concrete reaches thermal equilibrium, it really sucks the heat right out of me. I won't even talk about the floor. Even in the front, "finished" section, where our Glenwood Home Grand is pouring out the BTUs, the tile floor is most unpleasant.

Gerald
10-24-2003, 07:38 PM
In my race car shed I installed drop ceiling grid and cut drywall as the panels. It was cheap, easy to install, gave me access to wires, etc., and didn't burn thru when the 10 gallon of race fuel caught fire.
Gerald

Gerald
10-24-2003, 07:38 PM
In my race car shed I installed drop ceiling grid and cut drywall as the panels. It was cheap, easy to install, gave me access to wires, etc., and didn't burn thru when the 10 gallon of race fuel caught fire.
Gerald

Gerald
10-24-2003, 07:38 PM
In my race car shed I installed drop ceiling grid and cut drywall as the panels. It was cheap, easy to install, gave me access to wires, etc., and didn't burn thru when the 10 gallon of race fuel caught fire.
Gerald

cs
10-27-2003, 09:55 AM
Pete, did you decide on what you're going to do? BTW if you want to use a lay in ceiling using Gyp board as Gerald suggest you don't have to cut the panels from regular gyp board. USG has a lay-in gyp panel.

Chad

cs
10-27-2003, 09:55 AM
Pete, did you decide on what you're going to do? BTW if you want to use a lay in ceiling using Gyp board as Gerald suggest you don't have to cut the panels from regular gyp board. USG has a lay-in gyp panel.

Chad

cs
10-27-2003, 09:55 AM
Pete, did you decide on what you're going to do? BTW if you want to use a lay in ceiling using Gyp board as Gerald suggest you don't have to cut the panels from regular gyp board. USG has a lay-in gyp panel.

Chad

Alan D. Hyde
10-27-2003, 12:31 PM
As with many other things, the Romans were there ahead of us...

http://www.canterburytrust.co.uk/schools/assets/gall09cb.jpg

This is a depiction of a Roman hypocaust.

Cold walls and floors can usually be fixed, one way or another...

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
10-27-2003, 12:31 PM
As with many other things, the Romans were there ahead of us...

http://www.canterburytrust.co.uk/schools/assets/gall09cb.jpg

This is a depiction of a Roman hypocaust.

Cold walls and floors can usually be fixed, one way or another...

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
10-27-2003, 12:31 PM
As with many other things, the Romans were there ahead of us...

http://www.canterburytrust.co.uk/schools/assets/gall09cb.jpg

This is a depiction of a Roman hypocaust.

Cold walls and floors can usually be fixed, one way or another...

Alan

Pete Dorr
10-27-2003, 02:22 PM
Chad

I need to get some pricing on a few things. My goals at the start were low cost and maximizing height.

I think the cheapest solution that meets these requirements is sheetrock attached directly to the ceiling joists. My concern still remains that the framing will move seasonally and mess things up. Strapping is cheap and easy and would resolve this so I will do this. The few pipe runs can be bumped down a few inches. No big deal.

A rough shiplap pine ceiling would be way cool but I don't think that counts as cheap.

I do have heating ducts I can tap into so heat is not a concern.

I'll have 1 9x12 rug & pad where the tv viewing area is. Other than that I want to have concrete so the kids can boogie around on whatever wheeled things they are using.

Been working on cleaning up the garage/shop so I can fix my Beetle Cat. Not enough time in the day.

Pete

Pete Dorr
10-27-2003, 02:22 PM
Chad

I need to get some pricing on a few things. My goals at the start were low cost and maximizing height.

I think the cheapest solution that meets these requirements is sheetrock attached directly to the ceiling joists. My concern still remains that the framing will move seasonally and mess things up. Strapping is cheap and easy and would resolve this so I will do this. The few pipe runs can be bumped down a few inches. No big deal.

A rough shiplap pine ceiling would be way cool but I don't think that counts as cheap.

I do have heating ducts I can tap into so heat is not a concern.

I'll have 1 9x12 rug & pad where the tv viewing area is. Other than that I want to have concrete so the kids can boogie around on whatever wheeled things they are using.

Been working on cleaning up the garage/shop so I can fix my Beetle Cat. Not enough time in the day.

Pete

Pete Dorr
10-27-2003, 02:22 PM
Chad

I need to get some pricing on a few things. My goals at the start were low cost and maximizing height.

I think the cheapest solution that meets these requirements is sheetrock attached directly to the ceiling joists. My concern still remains that the framing will move seasonally and mess things up. Strapping is cheap and easy and would resolve this so I will do this. The few pipe runs can be bumped down a few inches. No big deal.

A rough shiplap pine ceiling would be way cool but I don't think that counts as cheap.

I do have heating ducts I can tap into so heat is not a concern.

I'll have 1 9x12 rug & pad where the tv viewing area is. Other than that I want to have concrete so the kids can boogie around on whatever wheeled things they are using.

Been working on cleaning up the garage/shop so I can fix my Beetle Cat. Not enough time in the day.

Pete