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gert
02-23-2001, 01:01 PM
I have seen chain mail/mesh gloves; does any one know where these are available?

gert
02-23-2001, 01:01 PM
I have seen chain mail/mesh gloves; does any one know where these are available?

gert
02-23-2001, 01:01 PM
I have seen chain mail/mesh gloves; does any one know where these are available?

G. Schollmeier
02-23-2001, 01:10 PM
I can't help with your search. I ask that you please don't wear gloves while operating power tools. If you must be careful.
Gary

G. Schollmeier
02-23-2001, 01:10 PM
I can't help with your search. I ask that you please don't wear gloves while operating power tools. If you must be careful.
Gary

G. Schollmeier
02-23-2001, 01:10 PM
I can't help with your search. I ask that you please don't wear gloves while operating power tools. If you must be careful.
Gary

ishmael
02-23-2001, 01:26 PM
Hi,

If you do a search, and check out table saw threads, there is a bunch of good advice on the safe operation of that tool.

I too think gloves aren't very sensible working around spinning shafts, and whirring blades. The only exception might be repetitive gross operations (as in not requiring fine hand skills close to the blade, not sickening) like ripping or milling a large amount of stock. Ooh gross! He he. And there, they ain't gonna likely help anyway 'cept to prevent splinters.

Learn to use the tool safely; use it only when wide awake; leave the armor for jousting. Tally ho!

Best, Jack.

ishmael
02-23-2001, 01:26 PM
Hi,

If you do a search, and check out table saw threads, there is a bunch of good advice on the safe operation of that tool.

I too think gloves aren't very sensible working around spinning shafts, and whirring blades. The only exception might be repetitive gross operations (as in not requiring fine hand skills close to the blade, not sickening) like ripping or milling a large amount of stock. Ooh gross! He he. And there, they ain't gonna likely help anyway 'cept to prevent splinters.

Learn to use the tool safely; use it only when wide awake; leave the armor for jousting. Tally ho!

Best, Jack.

ishmael
02-23-2001, 01:26 PM
Hi,

If you do a search, and check out table saw threads, there is a bunch of good advice on the safe operation of that tool.

I too think gloves aren't very sensible working around spinning shafts, and whirring blades. The only exception might be repetitive gross operations (as in not requiring fine hand skills close to the blade, not sickening) like ripping or milling a large amount of stock. Ooh gross! He he. And there, they ain't gonna likely help anyway 'cept to prevent splinters.

Learn to use the tool safely; use it only when wide awake; leave the armor for jousting. Tally ho!

Best, Jack.

gert
02-23-2001, 02:20 PM
I agree completly, I would never wear gloves but we just had a senior member of our crew cut himself (again); he has always worn gloves when he's ripping lumber. The guy is good, he realy knows his stuff but because of the amount of ripping he does, the stuff that comes off the blade and the nature of rough lumber he insists on wearing gloves. Those guys on tv who play with sharks wear mail gloves.

gert
02-23-2001, 02:20 PM
I agree completly, I would never wear gloves but we just had a senior member of our crew cut himself (again); he has always worn gloves when he's ripping lumber. The guy is good, he realy knows his stuff but because of the amount of ripping he does, the stuff that comes off the blade and the nature of rough lumber he insists on wearing gloves. Those guys on tv who play with sharks wear mail gloves.

gert
02-23-2001, 02:20 PM
I agree completly, I would never wear gloves but we just had a senior member of our crew cut himself (again); he has always worn gloves when he's ripping lumber. The guy is good, he realy knows his stuff but because of the amount of ripping he does, the stuff that comes off the blade and the nature of rough lumber he insists on wearing gloves. Those guys on tv who play with sharks wear mail gloves.

paladin
02-23-2001, 02:38 PM
The "armored" gloves you see some folks wearing were designed to be worn by persons doing woodcarving using very sharp small tools which could slip depending on wood grain. This may be a proper place for them. I have always had my shop instructors (40 years worth) insist on no jewelry and no gloves and short sleeves around power tools....sage advice. I have the titanium chain mail gauntlets (gloves) but they were designed for an entirely different purpose....and....they are really quite expensive.

paladin
02-23-2001, 02:38 PM
The "armored" gloves you see some folks wearing were designed to be worn by persons doing woodcarving using very sharp small tools which could slip depending on wood grain. This may be a proper place for them. I have always had my shop instructors (40 years worth) insist on no jewelry and no gloves and short sleeves around power tools....sage advice. I have the titanium chain mail gauntlets (gloves) but they were designed for an entirely different purpose....and....they are really quite expensive.

paladin
02-23-2001, 02:38 PM
The "armored" gloves you see some folks wearing were designed to be worn by persons doing woodcarving using very sharp small tools which could slip depending on wood grain. This may be a proper place for them. I have always had my shop instructors (40 years worth) insist on no jewelry and no gloves and short sleeves around power tools....sage advice. I have the titanium chain mail gauntlets (gloves) but they were designed for an entirely different purpose....and....they are really quite expensive.

Jamie Hascall
02-23-2001, 02:50 PM
I'm afraid that the vision that comes to mind of a blade contacting a mail glove would be for it to catch and pull the hand in with the result being even uglier damage. I hope the negative experience was not too expensive for your crew member and that the memory of it will help him be more aware.

Jamie

Jamie Hascall
02-23-2001, 02:50 PM
I'm afraid that the vision that comes to mind of a blade contacting a mail glove would be for it to catch and pull the hand in with the result being even uglier damage. I hope the negative experience was not too expensive for your crew member and that the memory of it will help him be more aware.

Jamie

Jamie Hascall
02-23-2001, 02:50 PM
I'm afraid that the vision that comes to mind of a blade contacting a mail glove would be for it to catch and pull the hand in with the result being even uglier damage. I hope the negative experience was not too expensive for your crew member and that the memory of it will help him be more aware.

Jamie

ishmael
02-23-2001, 03:02 PM
After I posted, I thought of the same thing Paladin...did, except I think I've seen them in kevlar, so as not to harm that carving tool edge whilst still staving off cut hands.

If it's just for rough ripping and such, what is wrong with some leather work gloves? Must be sumpthin' yet to be revealed.

Best, Jack

ishmael
02-23-2001, 03:02 PM
After I posted, I thought of the same thing Paladin...did, except I think I've seen them in kevlar, so as not to harm that carving tool edge whilst still staving off cut hands.

If it's just for rough ripping and such, what is wrong with some leather work gloves? Must be sumpthin' yet to be revealed.

Best, Jack

ishmael
02-23-2001, 03:02 PM
After I posted, I thought of the same thing Paladin...did, except I think I've seen them in kevlar, so as not to harm that carving tool edge whilst still staving off cut hands.

If it's just for rough ripping and such, what is wrong with some leather work gloves? Must be sumpthin' yet to be revealed.

Best, Jack

htom
02-23-2001, 04:19 PM
What are you going to make the gloves out of that's not going to

a) make the hand larger (thus more likely to be damaged)?

b) come off the hand instantly when the tool grabs it? (Note that's =when= not =if=!)

c) not allow the hand to be pulled into the tool?

d) a power saw is not a shark bite!

... remainder of rant skipped.

We live in Minnesota, just down the road from a new home construction zone. I see these guys sawing every day in -40 F windchills. They take their gloves off when they use the saws, put them back on (with the sometimes exception of someone using a cutoff saw, and even then usually the one actually working the trigger isn't gloved.)

Give your skilled sawyer a pair of helpers who wear gloves to handle the lumber and never put their fingers near the blades while they move the lumber about.

htom
02-23-2001, 04:19 PM
What are you going to make the gloves out of that's not going to

a) make the hand larger (thus more likely to be damaged)?

b) come off the hand instantly when the tool grabs it? (Note that's =when= not =if=!)

c) not allow the hand to be pulled into the tool?

d) a power saw is not a shark bite!

... remainder of rant skipped.

We live in Minnesota, just down the road from a new home construction zone. I see these guys sawing every day in -40 F windchills. They take their gloves off when they use the saws, put them back on (with the sometimes exception of someone using a cutoff saw, and even then usually the one actually working the trigger isn't gloved.)

Give your skilled sawyer a pair of helpers who wear gloves to handle the lumber and never put their fingers near the blades while they move the lumber about.

htom
02-23-2001, 04:19 PM
What are you going to make the gloves out of that's not going to

a) make the hand larger (thus more likely to be damaged)?

b) come off the hand instantly when the tool grabs it? (Note that's =when= not =if=!)

c) not allow the hand to be pulled into the tool?

d) a power saw is not a shark bite!

... remainder of rant skipped.

We live in Minnesota, just down the road from a new home construction zone. I see these guys sawing every day in -40 F windchills. They take their gloves off when they use the saws, put them back on (with the sometimes exception of someone using a cutoff saw, and even then usually the one actually working the trigger isn't gloved.)

Give your skilled sawyer a pair of helpers who wear gloves to handle the lumber and never put their fingers near the blades while they move the lumber about.

gert
02-23-2001, 04:39 PM
thanks all:
I don't think there is an answer; gloves certanly arn't part of it. The damage was fairly substantial and we're still kind of reeling from it; just be carefull every one, and listen to your guts, if it feels unsafe IT IS.

gert
02-23-2001, 04:39 PM
thanks all:
I don't think there is an answer; gloves certanly arn't part of it. The damage was fairly substantial and we're still kind of reeling from it; just be carefull every one, and listen to your guts, if it feels unsafe IT IS.

gert
02-23-2001, 04:39 PM
thanks all:
I don't think there is an answer; gloves certanly arn't part of it. The damage was fairly substantial and we're still kind of reeling from it; just be carefull every one, and listen to your guts, if it feels unsafe IT IS.

landlocked sailor
02-23-2001, 05:00 PM
I take care of a LOT of power tool injuries and the table saw is far and away the most common and most destructive (the hand held circular saw is next, followed by the jointer). THERE IS NO WAY TO MAKE IT SAFE!! As woodworkers we MUST accept this fact and have great respect for it. I believe that the stock guards are worse than useless. Anti-kickback devices, like feather-boards are excellent, as are push-sticks; anything that keeps your hands as far from the blade as practical. Repetitive tasks are the worst, they lead to inattention. ATTENTION is the most important safety too. Fortunately for us, there are few operations in boatbuilding that a band-saw cannot do instead of a table-saw, but I still find my Powermatic "66" indispensible. Gloves? No way!

landlocked sailor
02-23-2001, 05:00 PM
I take care of a LOT of power tool injuries and the table saw is far and away the most common and most destructive (the hand held circular saw is next, followed by the jointer). THERE IS NO WAY TO MAKE IT SAFE!! As woodworkers we MUST accept this fact and have great respect for it. I believe that the stock guards are worse than useless. Anti-kickback devices, like feather-boards are excellent, as are push-sticks; anything that keeps your hands as far from the blade as practical. Repetitive tasks are the worst, they lead to inattention. ATTENTION is the most important safety too. Fortunately for us, there are few operations in boatbuilding that a band-saw cannot do instead of a table-saw, but I still find my Powermatic "66" indispensible. Gloves? No way!

landlocked sailor
02-23-2001, 05:00 PM
I take care of a LOT of power tool injuries and the table saw is far and away the most common and most destructive (the hand held circular saw is next, followed by the jointer). THERE IS NO WAY TO MAKE IT SAFE!! As woodworkers we MUST accept this fact and have great respect for it. I believe that the stock guards are worse than useless. Anti-kickback devices, like feather-boards are excellent, as are push-sticks; anything that keeps your hands as far from the blade as practical. Repetitive tasks are the worst, they lead to inattention. ATTENTION is the most important safety too. Fortunately for us, there are few operations in boatbuilding that a band-saw cannot do instead of a table-saw, but I still find my Powermatic "66" indispensible. Gloves? No way!

Bob Cleek
02-23-2001, 06:37 PM
The chain mail gloves to which you refer are a standard item for meat cutters, who work very fast with very sharp knives and very slippery meat. There are NOT for use with power tools, as said here over and over again. Let me add this as well... beware of safety devices which lull you into a sense of security and invite carelessness. I treat my powertools like I treat a loaded gun. EVERY gun is loaded and EVERY power tool is dangerous. NEVER trust the "safety" and REALLY NEVER believe the guy who says it isn't loaded.

While we are on a glove rant, let me throw in my two cents worth about the stupidity of "sailing gloves." What a bunch of BS. Cracks me up seeing these clowns with their "clothing store chandlery" outfits, fancy fingerless gloves and all. Anything on your hand can catch on a line or whatever and cause amazing injury. An old retired China Hand bosun hammered it into me: "Never wear gloves or a ring around any kind of boat or any kind of machinery." A glove can catch on a howser under tension and rip your arm off. I passed on a wedding ring (twice) after a couple of buddies came to grief over theirs, and I'm not only talking about their divorces! Doing a haulout, one guy stepped off a two foot plank staging while holding on to the aluminum rail of his plastic bucket. The step was a little longer than he expected. His wedding ring caught on the metal rail while the rest of him dropped the extra eight inches or so... the ring, and the finger, stayed aboard! The other guy was tuning his engine when his wedding ring shorted out on the starter cable terminal... the gold ring melted around the finger burning right down to the bone. Lots of plastic surgery later, he still had the finger, but no tendon and no use of it... Not to scare the little children or anything... AND... just so I don't get complacent myself, I gotta remember to remind myself to be careful all the time. You betcha, it's the repetitive stuff that bites you every time. That and when you get tired. As for that last bottle of beer or that roach you found from the night before and decided to finish off before you tackled that big job... fuggedaboudit!

Bob Cleek
02-23-2001, 06:37 PM
The chain mail gloves to which you refer are a standard item for meat cutters, who work very fast with very sharp knives and very slippery meat. There are NOT for use with power tools, as said here over and over again. Let me add this as well... beware of safety devices which lull you into a sense of security and invite carelessness. I treat my powertools like I treat a loaded gun. EVERY gun is loaded and EVERY power tool is dangerous. NEVER trust the "safety" and REALLY NEVER believe the guy who says it isn't loaded.

While we are on a glove rant, let me throw in my two cents worth about the stupidity of "sailing gloves." What a bunch of BS. Cracks me up seeing these clowns with their "clothing store chandlery" outfits, fancy fingerless gloves and all. Anything on your hand can catch on a line or whatever and cause amazing injury. An old retired China Hand bosun hammered it into me: "Never wear gloves or a ring around any kind of boat or any kind of machinery." A glove can catch on a howser under tension and rip your arm off. I passed on a wedding ring (twice) after a couple of buddies came to grief over theirs, and I'm not only talking about their divorces! Doing a haulout, one guy stepped off a two foot plank staging while holding on to the aluminum rail of his plastic bucket. The step was a little longer than he expected. His wedding ring caught on the metal rail while the rest of him dropped the extra eight inches or so... the ring, and the finger, stayed aboard! The other guy was tuning his engine when his wedding ring shorted out on the starter cable terminal... the gold ring melted around the finger burning right down to the bone. Lots of plastic surgery later, he still had the finger, but no tendon and no use of it... Not to scare the little children or anything... AND... just so I don't get complacent myself, I gotta remember to remind myself to be careful all the time. You betcha, it's the repetitive stuff that bites you every time. That and when you get tired. As for that last bottle of beer or that roach you found from the night before and decided to finish off before you tackled that big job... fuggedaboudit!

Bob Cleek
02-23-2001, 06:37 PM
The chain mail gloves to which you refer are a standard item for meat cutters, who work very fast with very sharp knives and very slippery meat. There are NOT for use with power tools, as said here over and over again. Let me add this as well... beware of safety devices which lull you into a sense of security and invite carelessness. I treat my powertools like I treat a loaded gun. EVERY gun is loaded and EVERY power tool is dangerous. NEVER trust the "safety" and REALLY NEVER believe the guy who says it isn't loaded.

While we are on a glove rant, let me throw in my two cents worth about the stupidity of "sailing gloves." What a bunch of BS. Cracks me up seeing these clowns with their "clothing store chandlery" outfits, fancy fingerless gloves and all. Anything on your hand can catch on a line or whatever and cause amazing injury. An old retired China Hand bosun hammered it into me: "Never wear gloves or a ring around any kind of boat or any kind of machinery." A glove can catch on a howser under tension and rip your arm off. I passed on a wedding ring (twice) after a couple of buddies came to grief over theirs, and I'm not only talking about their divorces! Doing a haulout, one guy stepped off a two foot plank staging while holding on to the aluminum rail of his plastic bucket. The step was a little longer than he expected. His wedding ring caught on the metal rail while the rest of him dropped the extra eight inches or so... the ring, and the finger, stayed aboard! The other guy was tuning his engine when his wedding ring shorted out on the starter cable terminal... the gold ring melted around the finger burning right down to the bone. Lots of plastic surgery later, he still had the finger, but no tendon and no use of it... Not to scare the little children or anything... AND... just so I don't get complacent myself, I gotta remember to remind myself to be careful all the time. You betcha, it's the repetitive stuff that bites you every time. That and when you get tired. As for that last bottle of beer or that roach you found from the night before and decided to finish off before you tackled that big job... fuggedaboudit!

ishmael
02-23-2001, 10:26 PM
Wait Gert,

Don't rush away without telling us exactly how this happened. I keep seeing rough sawn stock kicked by a saw or a milling machine, but you really haven't told us enough, for our sakes.

In fact, from what you've told us I'm intrigued/confused. Someone, with experience, feeding a saw et al, fairly badly wounded, without mixing it up with the blade(s). Clear it up. please.

ishmael
02-23-2001, 10:26 PM
Wait Gert,

Don't rush away without telling us exactly how this happened. I keep seeing rough sawn stock kicked by a saw or a milling machine, but you really haven't told us enough, for our sakes.

In fact, from what you've told us I'm intrigued/confused. Someone, with experience, feeding a saw et al, fairly badly wounded, without mixing it up with the blade(s). Clear it up. please.

ishmael
02-23-2001, 10:26 PM
Wait Gert,

Don't rush away without telling us exactly how this happened. I keep seeing rough sawn stock kicked by a saw or a milling machine, but you really haven't told us enough, for our sakes.

In fact, from what you've told us I'm intrigued/confused. Someone, with experience, feeding a saw et al, fairly badly wounded, without mixing it up with the blade(s). Clear it up. please.

Ron Williamson
02-24-2001, 06:08 AM
Yeah!What Ish said!
Did his hand get speared with a tapered off rip or something?Or was he cut by the blade?

Ron Williamson
02-24-2001, 06:08 AM
Yeah!What Ish said!
Did his hand get speared with a tapered off rip or something?Or was he cut by the blade?

Ron Williamson
02-24-2001, 06:08 AM
Yeah!What Ish said!
Did his hand get speared with a tapered off rip or something?Or was he cut by the blade?

gert
02-24-2001, 10:40 AM
He's 60 years old, works like a horse and is our" break out" man. He was ripping 2" solid stock on a 12" table saw. His left hand (he's right handed) got too close to the blade when he went to remove the fall down. He gouged the index finger lateraly, nicked the (previously shortened by shaper) middle finger and removed the end of the thumb to the first joint. The docs say he could be off for 6 months ( a serious loss for both of us and no pun intended) but I suspect he'll be back sooner, he likes to work.

gert
02-24-2001, 10:40 AM
He's 60 years old, works like a horse and is our" break out" man. He was ripping 2" solid stock on a 12" table saw. His left hand (he's right handed) got too close to the blade when he went to remove the fall down. He gouged the index finger lateraly, nicked the (previously shortened by shaper) middle finger and removed the end of the thumb to the first joint. The docs say he could be off for 6 months ( a serious loss for both of us and no pun intended) but I suspect he'll be back sooner, he likes to work.

gert
02-24-2001, 10:40 AM
He's 60 years old, works like a horse and is our" break out" man. He was ripping 2" solid stock on a 12" table saw. His left hand (he's right handed) got too close to the blade when he went to remove the fall down. He gouged the index finger lateraly, nicked the (previously shortened by shaper) middle finger and removed the end of the thumb to the first joint. The docs say he could be off for 6 months ( a serious loss for both of us and no pun intended) but I suspect he'll be back sooner, he likes to work.

Ron Williamson
02-24-2001, 02:58 PM
Too bad about your guy.OW!
I've seen some guys moving 1/8" offrips away from the blade with their thumbnail,because they didn't want to be speared.
Our ripsaw has a powerfeed that keeps body parts seperate from sharp spinny things.
We tend to leave the offrip(falldown?) alone on the other saws and it has yet to do harm.
What spooks me is when someone who doesn't know the rules(trying to "help",generally) tries to tail the tablesaw and ends up grabbing at the ripping or the lumber or both and pulls when I am not expecting it.
I hope that the compensation board and the Ministry of Labour are gentle with you.
R

Ron Williamson
02-24-2001, 02:58 PM
Too bad about your guy.OW!
I've seen some guys moving 1/8" offrips away from the blade with their thumbnail,because they didn't want to be speared.
Our ripsaw has a powerfeed that keeps body parts seperate from sharp spinny things.
We tend to leave the offrip(falldown?) alone on the other saws and it has yet to do harm.
What spooks me is when someone who doesn't know the rules(trying to "help",generally) tries to tail the tablesaw and ends up grabbing at the ripping or the lumber or both and pulls when I am not expecting it.
I hope that the compensation board and the Ministry of Labour are gentle with you.
R

Ron Williamson
02-24-2001, 02:58 PM
Too bad about your guy.OW!
I've seen some guys moving 1/8" offrips away from the blade with their thumbnail,because they didn't want to be speared.
Our ripsaw has a powerfeed that keeps body parts seperate from sharp spinny things.
We tend to leave the offrip(falldown?) alone on the other saws and it has yet to do harm.
What spooks me is when someone who doesn't know the rules(trying to "help",generally) tries to tail the tablesaw and ends up grabbing at the ripping or the lumber or both and pulls when I am not expecting it.
I hope that the compensation board and the Ministry of Labour are gentle with you.
R