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Todd Schliemann
03-09-2001, 10:20 AM
My 34 yr. old stainless steel fuel tank seems to be leaking a bit. A small amount of fuel in the bilge on my in-water, layed up auxiliary sloop. Have the tank out now. The recommendations that I have so far are to replace with 1/8" thk. aluminum tank (capacity 14 gallons, flat section profile, up out of the bilge), coated with Zinc chromate or epoxy primer. Gives me a chance to upgrade some of the other less than appropriate features, like proper venting and adequate water separator.

This sound right to you all?

Todd Schliemann
03-09-2001, 10:20 AM
My 34 yr. old stainless steel fuel tank seems to be leaking a bit. A small amount of fuel in the bilge on my in-water, layed up auxiliary sloop. Have the tank out now. The recommendations that I have so far are to replace with 1/8" thk. aluminum tank (capacity 14 gallons, flat section profile, up out of the bilge), coated with Zinc chromate or epoxy primer. Gives me a chance to upgrade some of the other less than appropriate features, like proper venting and adequate water separator.

This sound right to you all?

Todd Schliemann
03-09-2001, 10:20 AM
My 34 yr. old stainless steel fuel tank seems to be leaking a bit. A small amount of fuel in the bilge on my in-water, layed up auxiliary sloop. Have the tank out now. The recommendations that I have so far are to replace with 1/8" thk. aluminum tank (capacity 14 gallons, flat section profile, up out of the bilge), coated with Zinc chromate or epoxy primer. Gives me a chance to upgrade some of the other less than appropriate features, like proper venting and adequate water separator.

This sound right to you all?

Wayne Jeffers
03-09-2001, 11:29 AM
Todd,

Some of USCG information on fuel tanks in Boating Safety Circular #79 at the following site may be of use.

http://www.uscgboating.org/reg/reg_circularx.asp

Wayne

Wayne Jeffers
03-09-2001, 11:29 AM
Todd,

Some of USCG information on fuel tanks in Boating Safety Circular #79 at the following site may be of use.

http://www.uscgboating.org/reg/reg_circularx.asp

Wayne

Wayne Jeffers
03-09-2001, 11:29 AM
Todd,

Some of USCG information on fuel tanks in Boating Safety Circular #79 at the following site may be of use.

http://www.uscgboating.org/reg/reg_circularx.asp

Wayne

Todd Schliemann
03-09-2001, 01:53 PM
Wayne, Very interesting, and I'm afraid somewhat disconcerting and inconclusive. Thanks though for the heads up. Time for more research.

Always like when publications like that talk about something lasting for "the service life of the vessel." Like there is a moment in time when it is destined to sink or fall apart all at once (if it hasn't blown up already). Constant vigilance!

Thanks again.

Todd Schliemann
03-09-2001, 01:53 PM
Wayne, Very interesting, and I'm afraid somewhat disconcerting and inconclusive. Thanks though for the heads up. Time for more research.

Always like when publications like that talk about something lasting for "the service life of the vessel." Like there is a moment in time when it is destined to sink or fall apart all at once (if it hasn't blown up already). Constant vigilance!

Thanks again.

Todd Schliemann
03-09-2001, 01:53 PM
Wayne, Very interesting, and I'm afraid somewhat disconcerting and inconclusive. Thanks though for the heads up. Time for more research.

Always like when publications like that talk about something lasting for "the service life of the vessel." Like there is a moment in time when it is destined to sink or fall apart all at once (if it hasn't blown up already). Constant vigilance!

Thanks again.

Roger Cumming
03-11-2001, 11:55 PM
Why choose aluminum when stainless steel is so readily available? Aluminum is extremely reactive in the marine environment, especially the grades readily available.

I once found a shop in Brooklyn fabricating huge stainless steel vessels for breweries. The proprietor was familiar with small fuel tanks for boats (baffles, vents, etc.) and made me an excellent, cylindrical tank the same size as the old, rusty one. And he did it for far less than the "marine" version in the Waste Marine catalog. I think stainless steel fabrication is at least as easy as that for aluminum, and the final product is better. Make the new one to the same size and shape as the old one.

Roger Cumming
03-11-2001, 11:55 PM
Why choose aluminum when stainless steel is so readily available? Aluminum is extremely reactive in the marine environment, especially the grades readily available.

I once found a shop in Brooklyn fabricating huge stainless steel vessels for breweries. The proprietor was familiar with small fuel tanks for boats (baffles, vents, etc.) and made me an excellent, cylindrical tank the same size as the old, rusty one. And he did it for far less than the "marine" version in the Waste Marine catalog. I think stainless steel fabrication is at least as easy as that for aluminum, and the final product is better. Make the new one to the same size and shape as the old one.

Roger Cumming
03-11-2001, 11:55 PM
Why choose aluminum when stainless steel is so readily available? Aluminum is extremely reactive in the marine environment, especially the grades readily available.

I once found a shop in Brooklyn fabricating huge stainless steel vessels for breweries. The proprietor was familiar with small fuel tanks for boats (baffles, vents, etc.) and made me an excellent, cylindrical tank the same size as the old, rusty one. And he did it for far less than the "marine" version in the Waste Marine catalog. I think stainless steel fabrication is at least as easy as that for aluminum, and the final product is better. Make the new one to the same size and shape as the old one.

Todd Schliemann
03-13-2001, 12:19 AM
Roger, yes that was my first instinct, however there have been some serious concerns about the stability of the welds in stainless fuel tank construction. The above referenced study makes obtuse reference to it. My tank must be quite flat, with very shallow sides, a form easily stressed at the corners based on it's support points. Aluminum is more readily welded without the associated stress for this form, if done to spec's, basically monocoque after welding. The key here, short of the suggestions for fiberglass tanks, is to assure that the tanks remain out of contact with the effects of salt water. Not a small concern when aboard a boat that lives on the sea. I have very good access to my tank and can inspect it easily and it will live well above the bilge, and am looking at the suggested increase in gauge, as well as coating with epoxy to help ward off the effects.

Todd Schliemann
03-13-2001, 12:19 AM
Roger, yes that was my first instinct, however there have been some serious concerns about the stability of the welds in stainless fuel tank construction. The above referenced study makes obtuse reference to it. My tank must be quite flat, with very shallow sides, a form easily stressed at the corners based on it's support points. Aluminum is more readily welded without the associated stress for this form, if done to spec's, basically monocoque after welding. The key here, short of the suggestions for fiberglass tanks, is to assure that the tanks remain out of contact with the effects of salt water. Not a small concern when aboard a boat that lives on the sea. I have very good access to my tank and can inspect it easily and it will live well above the bilge, and am looking at the suggested increase in gauge, as well as coating with epoxy to help ward off the effects.

Todd Schliemann
03-13-2001, 12:19 AM
Roger, yes that was my first instinct, however there have been some serious concerns about the stability of the welds in stainless fuel tank construction. The above referenced study makes obtuse reference to it. My tank must be quite flat, with very shallow sides, a form easily stressed at the corners based on it's support points. Aluminum is more readily welded without the associated stress for this form, if done to spec's, basically monocoque after welding. The key here, short of the suggestions for fiberglass tanks, is to assure that the tanks remain out of contact with the effects of salt water. Not a small concern when aboard a boat that lives on the sea. I have very good access to my tank and can inspect it easily and it will live well above the bilge, and am looking at the suggested increase in gauge, as well as coating with epoxy to help ward off the effects.

Ken Liden
03-13-2001, 09:00 PM
Take a good look around. I think that it is a good safe bet that most production boats have aluminum tanks and have had for many years.

Ken Liden
03-13-2001, 09:00 PM
Take a good look around. I think that it is a good safe bet that most production boats have aluminum tanks and have had for many years.

Ken Liden
03-13-2001, 09:00 PM
Take a good look around. I think that it is a good safe bet that most production boats have aluminum tanks and have had for many years.

HP3
03-15-2001, 01:11 PM
Todd,
For an excellent article on aluminum tank instillation look at Dave Pescoe's site.

http://www.yachtsurvey.com/fueltank.htm

This guy has seen lots of them and his recomendations seem valid. Very good site in general but centers on plastic-fantastic production boats.

If you like sport fish boats check out "Marlin Monroe" 43' Bert. Hubba Hubba!!
Hank

HP3
03-15-2001, 01:11 PM
Todd,
For an excellent article on aluminum tank instillation look at Dave Pescoe's site.

http://www.yachtsurvey.com/fueltank.htm

This guy has seen lots of them and his recomendations seem valid. Very good site in general but centers on plastic-fantastic production boats.

If you like sport fish boats check out "Marlin Monroe" 43' Bert. Hubba Hubba!!
Hank

HP3
03-15-2001, 01:11 PM
Todd,
For an excellent article on aluminum tank instillation look at Dave Pescoe's site.

http://www.yachtsurvey.com/fueltank.htm

This guy has seen lots of them and his recomendations seem valid. Very good site in general but centers on plastic-fantastic production boats.

If you like sport fish boats check out "Marlin Monroe" 43' Bert. Hubba Hubba!!
Hank

smlatici
03-15-2001, 03:40 PM
I recently completed a 42' Off-Soundings yawl and installed an off the shelf 55 gal aluminum tank. I agree with you that the welds in ss tanks are subject to crevice corrosion and aluminum is a better bet. However installation is critical. Securing straps of metal or wood should be insulated from the tank with strips of neoprene. this will prevent condensation under the straps and prevent corrosion. Also the fittings in direct contact with the tank must be ss rather than brass. You can go to brass off of the ss. I painted mine with an expoxy appliance paint and it holds up well. the trick is to get the damn tank in the boat without scratching through the paint. Incidentally the Coast Guard seems to prefer mild steel tanks, epoxy coated. West Marine has a good selection of aluminum tanks. You should also consider a polyethelene tank if you can find one that will fit. Make sure it is cross linked polyethelene. Good luck

smlatici
03-15-2001, 03:40 PM
I recently completed a 42' Off-Soundings yawl and installed an off the shelf 55 gal aluminum tank. I agree with you that the welds in ss tanks are subject to crevice corrosion and aluminum is a better bet. However installation is critical. Securing straps of metal or wood should be insulated from the tank with strips of neoprene. this will prevent condensation under the straps and prevent corrosion. Also the fittings in direct contact with the tank must be ss rather than brass. You can go to brass off of the ss. I painted mine with an expoxy appliance paint and it holds up well. the trick is to get the damn tank in the boat without scratching through the paint. Incidentally the Coast Guard seems to prefer mild steel tanks, epoxy coated. West Marine has a good selection of aluminum tanks. You should also consider a polyethelene tank if you can find one that will fit. Make sure it is cross linked polyethelene. Good luck

smlatici
03-15-2001, 03:40 PM
I recently completed a 42' Off-Soundings yawl and installed an off the shelf 55 gal aluminum tank. I agree with you that the welds in ss tanks are subject to crevice corrosion and aluminum is a better bet. However installation is critical. Securing straps of metal or wood should be insulated from the tank with strips of neoprene. this will prevent condensation under the straps and prevent corrosion. Also the fittings in direct contact with the tank must be ss rather than brass. You can go to brass off of the ss. I painted mine with an expoxy appliance paint and it holds up well. the trick is to get the damn tank in the boat without scratching through the paint. Incidentally the Coast Guard seems to prefer mild steel tanks, epoxy coated. West Marine has a good selection of aluminum tanks. You should also consider a polyethelene tank if you can find one that will fit. Make sure it is cross linked polyethelene. Good luck