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J. Dillon
01-25-2001, 05:52 PM
Do you pack one ? I do all the time , only trouble is it's wearing out, or sharpened out. There's hardly anything left of the main blade. This Swiss Army knife has the usual stuff like screw drivers and a wood saw blade. It really stops em at the airports as the red handle has long been replaced by cheeks of cherry. They take a second good look. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif

Does anybody know of a similar type of knife that hasn't have a stainless steel blade ? http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/confused.gif It sure doesn't hold a edge and I'm looking for something like a high carbon steel that will last a bit longer but I also want all the goodies the " Swiss " provide. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/biggrin.gif JD

J. Dillon
01-25-2001, 05:52 PM
Do you pack one ? I do all the time , only trouble is it's wearing out, or sharpened out. There's hardly anything left of the main blade. This Swiss Army knife has the usual stuff like screw drivers and a wood saw blade. It really stops em at the airports as the red handle has long been replaced by cheeks of cherry. They take a second good look. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif

Does anybody know of a similar type of knife that hasn't have a stainless steel blade ? http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/confused.gif It sure doesn't hold a edge and I'm looking for something like a high carbon steel that will last a bit longer but I also want all the goodies the " Swiss " provide. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/biggrin.gif JD

J. Dillon
01-25-2001, 05:52 PM
Do you pack one ? I do all the time , only trouble is it's wearing out, or sharpened out. There's hardly anything left of the main blade. This Swiss Army knife has the usual stuff like screw drivers and a wood saw blade. It really stops em at the airports as the red handle has long been replaced by cheeks of cherry. They take a second good look. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif

Does anybody know of a similar type of knife that hasn't have a stainless steel blade ? http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/confused.gif It sure doesn't hold a edge and I'm looking for something like a high carbon steel that will last a bit longer but I also want all the goodies the " Swiss " provide. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/biggrin.gif JD

Jim H
01-25-2001, 06:30 PM
Well, I've seen a lot of folders but not one with a carbon steel blade. I'm going to a hidden-tang knife workshop this weekend, so I'll ask them if they have ever come accross one. Where I buy my supplies (blades, scales, blanks etc.) they have folder kits so I imagine it's possible to substitute a ss blade for a carbon blade if they make them. The only drawback would be the possiblity of rust at the pin which would be a headache. In any case I'll let you know what they say.

Jim

Oh yeah there was supposed to be a point to all of this was'nt there? You can make a folder customized to your needs, if your willing to take the time, they are harder to make than full and hidden tang knives, but then nothing good is easy.

Jim H
01-25-2001, 06:30 PM
Well, I've seen a lot of folders but not one with a carbon steel blade. I'm going to a hidden-tang knife workshop this weekend, so I'll ask them if they have ever come accross one. Where I buy my supplies (blades, scales, blanks etc.) they have folder kits so I imagine it's possible to substitute a ss blade for a carbon blade if they make them. The only drawback would be the possiblity of rust at the pin which would be a headache. In any case I'll let you know what they say.

Jim

Oh yeah there was supposed to be a point to all of this was'nt there? You can make a folder customized to your needs, if your willing to take the time, they are harder to make than full and hidden tang knives, but then nothing good is easy.

Jim H
01-25-2001, 06:30 PM
Well, I've seen a lot of folders but not one with a carbon steel blade. I'm going to a hidden-tang knife workshop this weekend, so I'll ask them if they have ever come accross one. Where I buy my supplies (blades, scales, blanks etc.) they have folder kits so I imagine it's possible to substitute a ss blade for a carbon blade if they make them. The only drawback would be the possiblity of rust at the pin which would be a headache. In any case I'll let you know what they say.

Jim

Oh yeah there was supposed to be a point to all of this was'nt there? You can make a folder customized to your needs, if your willing to take the time, they are harder to make than full and hidden tang knives, but then nothing good is easy.

NormMessinger
01-25-2001, 07:28 PM
JD, do you ever use any of the other blades on your Swiss Army Knife? Enough to justify carrying all that hardware just to have a blade?

My main tool is a middle sized three bladed Buck pocket knife. A couple of years ago I was given a multitool. A friend advised that one must carry it all the time or it would never be used. True. The pliers are used regularly, a screw driver blade occasionally, the rest almost never. If I want to cut something out comes the Buck.

--Norm

NormMessinger
01-25-2001, 07:28 PM
JD, do you ever use any of the other blades on your Swiss Army Knife? Enough to justify carrying all that hardware just to have a blade?

My main tool is a middle sized three bladed Buck pocket knife. A couple of years ago I was given a multitool. A friend advised that one must carry it all the time or it would never be used. True. The pliers are used regularly, a screw driver blade occasionally, the rest almost never. If I want to cut something out comes the Buck.

--Norm

NormMessinger
01-25-2001, 07:28 PM
JD, do you ever use any of the other blades on your Swiss Army Knife? Enough to justify carrying all that hardware just to have a blade?

My main tool is a middle sized three bladed Buck pocket knife. A couple of years ago I was given a multitool. A friend advised that one must carry it all the time or it would never be used. True. The pliers are used regularly, a screw driver blade occasionally, the rest almost never. If I want to cut something out comes the Buck.

--Norm

J. Dillon
01-25-2001, 10:21 PM
Norm,

I'd be happy with a screw driver http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif (Philips to) and one good carbon blade. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/biggrin.gif Everything I see seems to be stainless steel. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/frown.gif Perhaps the solution would be to take my present knife toss out the worn SS blade, get a good file and tool it to fit my Swiss knife... Unless Jim can come up with something. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif

J. Dillon
01-25-2001, 10:21 PM
Norm,

I'd be happy with a screw driver http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif (Philips to) and one good carbon blade. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/biggrin.gif Everything I see seems to be stainless steel. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/frown.gif Perhaps the solution would be to take my present knife toss out the worn SS blade, get a good file and tool it to fit my Swiss knife... Unless Jim can come up with something. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif

J. Dillon
01-25-2001, 10:21 PM
Norm,

I'd be happy with a screw driver http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif (Philips to) and one good carbon blade. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/biggrin.gif Everything I see seems to be stainless steel. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/frown.gif Perhaps the solution would be to take my present knife toss out the worn SS blade, get a good file and tool it to fit my Swiss knife... Unless Jim can come up with something. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif

Ed Harrow
01-25-2001, 10:25 PM
I've carried a single-blade (locking) Bean's knife for over 20 years. Does most everything I ever want it to do. It's predecesor sacrificed itself jumping an elevator operating relay. I don't know what that relay was carrying, but if there was anyone else in the elevator I'd now be known as "Sparky".

I do have an ancient Swiss Army-like knife that does, indeed, have carbon blades. I only use it camping, it looks ugly but it works. I don't know who made it but I'll dig it out and see if there's any markings on it. Ed

PS: I married SWMBO because she had a jacknife in her bag. I figured any woman that carried a jackknife around was a keeper
http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/cool.gif http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/biggrin.gif http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif

Ed Harrow
01-25-2001, 10:25 PM
I've carried a single-blade (locking) Bean's knife for over 20 years. Does most everything I ever want it to do. It's predecesor sacrificed itself jumping an elevator operating relay. I don't know what that relay was carrying, but if there was anyone else in the elevator I'd now be known as "Sparky".

I do have an ancient Swiss Army-like knife that does, indeed, have carbon blades. I only use it camping, it looks ugly but it works. I don't know who made it but I'll dig it out and see if there's any markings on it. Ed

PS: I married SWMBO because she had a jacknife in her bag. I figured any woman that carried a jackknife around was a keeper
http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/cool.gif http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/biggrin.gif http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif

Ed Harrow
01-25-2001, 10:25 PM
I've carried a single-blade (locking) Bean's knife for over 20 years. Does most everything I ever want it to do. It's predecesor sacrificed itself jumping an elevator operating relay. I don't know what that relay was carrying, but if there was anyone else in the elevator I'd now be known as "Sparky".

I do have an ancient Swiss Army-like knife that does, indeed, have carbon blades. I only use it camping, it looks ugly but it works. I don't know who made it but I'll dig it out and see if there's any markings on it. Ed

PS: I married SWMBO because she had a jacknife in her bag. I figured any woman that carried a jackknife around was a keeper
http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/cool.gif http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/biggrin.gif http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif

Jamie Hascall
01-25-2001, 11:03 PM
I dropped the venerable old SwissArmy knife into a black hole in the bilge which politely spit it out a few months later. In the mean time I rehabbed an Old Timer single blade knife I'd had since age 12 and I haven't gone back. I occasionally miss the corkscrew and the screwdriver, but both are canceled out by the joy of having just one really good blade. Try it for a while and see if you really need all that hardware.

Jamie

Jamie Hascall
01-25-2001, 11:03 PM
I dropped the venerable old SwissArmy knife into a black hole in the bilge which politely spit it out a few months later. In the mean time I rehabbed an Old Timer single blade knife I'd had since age 12 and I haven't gone back. I occasionally miss the corkscrew and the screwdriver, but both are canceled out by the joy of having just one really good blade. Try it for a while and see if you really need all that hardware.

Jamie

Jamie Hascall
01-25-2001, 11:03 PM
I dropped the venerable old SwissArmy knife into a black hole in the bilge which politely spit it out a few months later. In the mean time I rehabbed an Old Timer single blade knife I'd had since age 12 and I haven't gone back. I occasionally miss the corkscrew and the screwdriver, but both are canceled out by the joy of having just one really good blade. Try it for a while and see if you really need all that hardware.

Jamie

Chad Smith
01-26-2001, 07:49 AM
I would like to second the notion of a single lock blade. I've got a Buck and a couple of Frost lock blades that I choose between. I have real tools placed in strategic locations if I need something else.

Chad

Chad Smith
01-26-2001, 07:49 AM
I would like to second the notion of a single lock blade. I've got a Buck and a couple of Frost lock blades that I choose between. I have real tools placed in strategic locations if I need something else.

Chad

Chad Smith
01-26-2001, 07:49 AM
I would like to second the notion of a single lock blade. I've got a Buck and a couple of Frost lock blades that I choose between. I have real tools placed in strategic locations if I need something else.

Chad

Wayne Jeffers
01-26-2001, 08:02 AM
About 2 months ago, I lost the 3-bladed Buck no. 303 "Cadet" that I had carried daily since Christmas 1975. Sounds like Norm may have the same model. Mine had been sharpened so many times over the years that a couple of the blades were growing thin.

I bought a new no. 303 as a replacement, but it is taking a little getting used to. Different feel, and a few minor changes over the years.

A knife such as this is so useful for so many things that I feel as though I'm not fully dressed until I put it in my pocket.

Wayne

Wayne Jeffers
01-26-2001, 08:02 AM
About 2 months ago, I lost the 3-bladed Buck no. 303 "Cadet" that I had carried daily since Christmas 1975. Sounds like Norm may have the same model. Mine had been sharpened so many times over the years that a couple of the blades were growing thin.

I bought a new no. 303 as a replacement, but it is taking a little getting used to. Different feel, and a few minor changes over the years.

A knife such as this is so useful for so many things that I feel as though I'm not fully dressed until I put it in my pocket.

Wayne

Wayne Jeffers
01-26-2001, 08:02 AM
About 2 months ago, I lost the 3-bladed Buck no. 303 "Cadet" that I had carried daily since Christmas 1975. Sounds like Norm may have the same model. Mine had been sharpened so many times over the years that a couple of the blades were growing thin.

I bought a new no. 303 as a replacement, but it is taking a little getting used to. Different feel, and a few minor changes over the years.

A knife such as this is so useful for so many things that I feel as though I'm not fully dressed until I put it in my pocket.

Wayne

Charlie J
01-26-2001, 08:10 AM
I carry a Swiss army- the model with the set of pliers. Use it all the time til I need to actually cut something. For that I have a 30 year old 2 blade folding Craftsman Buck knock-off with about 1/2 the blades left.
Had an older swiss Army with a locking blade - it held an edge really well. Then the spring broke, so I sent it to be "repaired". They sent me a brand new one that sure is pretty - but it stays in the box in the drawer cause now it won't cut anything either. Oh Well.

Charlie J
01-26-2001, 08:10 AM
I carry a Swiss army- the model with the set of pliers. Use it all the time til I need to actually cut something. For that I have a 30 year old 2 blade folding Craftsman Buck knock-off with about 1/2 the blades left.
Had an older swiss Army with a locking blade - it held an edge really well. Then the spring broke, so I sent it to be "repaired". They sent me a brand new one that sure is pretty - but it stays in the box in the drawer cause now it won't cut anything either. Oh Well.

Charlie J
01-26-2001, 08:10 AM
I carry a Swiss army- the model with the set of pliers. Use it all the time til I need to actually cut something. For that I have a 30 year old 2 blade folding Craftsman Buck knock-off with about 1/2 the blades left.
Had an older swiss Army with a locking blade - it held an edge really well. Then the spring broke, so I sent it to be "repaired". They sent me a brand new one that sure is pretty - but it stays in the box in the drawer cause now it won't cut anything either. Oh Well.

Tom Lathrop
01-26-2001, 08:21 AM
Since I work with epoxy and other gunks quite a bit, a folding knife is almost impossible to get at when it's needed without messing up both clothes and knife. I use a sheath knife with a 3in blade that is on my belt and available almost all the time. I had the one I now use made in 1989 and it serves pretty well but the stainless blade is hard to sharpen and does not hold an edge well. It is easy to get at with messy gloves and the ebony handle can be cleaned by the occasional scraping. Very useful and I'd never go back to a folding knife.

I look for a replacement but most sheath knives are intended for hunters or outdoorsmen and have a curved upturned cutting edge. A straight cutting edge is much more useful as a shop knife but I've not been able to find one.

Does anyone know of a suitable knife with these features? I'd put up with the corrosion problems of carbon steel to have a durable and sharp edge. If there is a stainless alloy that does not compromise edge qualities, that would be ideal.

There is the Gerber multi that I like better than the Leatherman, but it is only used as a kind of tool kit when I'm on the boat.

Tom Lathrop
01-26-2001, 08:21 AM
Since I work with epoxy and other gunks quite a bit, a folding knife is almost impossible to get at when it's needed without messing up both clothes and knife. I use a sheath knife with a 3in blade that is on my belt and available almost all the time. I had the one I now use made in 1989 and it serves pretty well but the stainless blade is hard to sharpen and does not hold an edge well. It is easy to get at with messy gloves and the ebony handle can be cleaned by the occasional scraping. Very useful and I'd never go back to a folding knife.

I look for a replacement but most sheath knives are intended for hunters or outdoorsmen and have a curved upturned cutting edge. A straight cutting edge is much more useful as a shop knife but I've not been able to find one.

Does anyone know of a suitable knife with these features? I'd put up with the corrosion problems of carbon steel to have a durable and sharp edge. If there is a stainless alloy that does not compromise edge qualities, that would be ideal.

There is the Gerber multi that I like better than the Leatherman, but it is only used as a kind of tool kit when I'm on the boat.

Tom Lathrop
01-26-2001, 08:21 AM
Since I work with epoxy and other gunks quite a bit, a folding knife is almost impossible to get at when it's needed without messing up both clothes and knife. I use a sheath knife with a 3in blade that is on my belt and available almost all the time. I had the one I now use made in 1989 and it serves pretty well but the stainless blade is hard to sharpen and does not hold an edge well. It is easy to get at with messy gloves and the ebony handle can be cleaned by the occasional scraping. Very useful and I'd never go back to a folding knife.

I look for a replacement but most sheath knives are intended for hunters or outdoorsmen and have a curved upturned cutting edge. A straight cutting edge is much more useful as a shop knife but I've not been able to find one.

Does anyone know of a suitable knife with these features? I'd put up with the corrosion problems of carbon steel to have a durable and sharp edge. If there is a stainless alloy that does not compromise edge qualities, that would be ideal.

There is the Gerber multi that I like better than the Leatherman, but it is only used as a kind of tool kit when I'm on the boat.

Dave R
01-26-2001, 08:33 AM
I saw some small wooden handled fixed blade knives in Norway and wish I'd bought one. I saw an on-line link to a place to get them but seem to have lost the link. If I can find it, I'll post.

Well, that wasn't so hard. Look here:
http://www.ragweedforge.com/NorwegianKnifeCatalog.html

[This message has been edited by Dave R (edited 01-26-2001).]

Dave R
01-26-2001, 08:33 AM
I saw some small wooden handled fixed blade knives in Norway and wish I'd bought one. I saw an on-line link to a place to get them but seem to have lost the link. If I can find it, I'll post.

Well, that wasn't so hard. Look here:
http://www.ragweedforge.com/NorwegianKnifeCatalog.html

[This message has been edited by Dave R (edited 01-26-2001).]

Dave R
01-26-2001, 08:33 AM
I saw some small wooden handled fixed blade knives in Norway and wish I'd bought one. I saw an on-line link to a place to get them but seem to have lost the link. If I can find it, I'll post.

Well, that wasn't so hard. Look here:
http://www.ragweedforge.com/NorwegianKnifeCatalog.html

[This message has been edited by Dave R (edited 01-26-2001).]

Andrew
01-26-2001, 08:56 AM
Call Atlanta Cutlery 800-883-0300 and ask for a catalog. They have just about every kind of knife you could think of. They also have kits and parts to make your own. Quality and service are good. Some items are a bit cheesy or of mixed quality (particularly miltary surplus items) but they mention that in the description.

JD - If you want carbon steel why not damascus. They have Damascus steel blanks and complete knives. They also have Norwegian blade blanks that are SS-HighCarbon-SS sandwiches which give you the best of both worlds

Andrew
01-26-2001, 08:56 AM
Call Atlanta Cutlery 800-883-0300 and ask for a catalog. They have just about every kind of knife you could think of. They also have kits and parts to make your own. Quality and service are good. Some items are a bit cheesy or of mixed quality (particularly miltary surplus items) but they mention that in the description.

JD - If you want carbon steel why not damascus. They have Damascus steel blanks and complete knives. They also have Norwegian blade blanks that are SS-HighCarbon-SS sandwiches which give you the best of both worlds

Andrew
01-26-2001, 08:56 AM
Call Atlanta Cutlery 800-883-0300 and ask for a catalog. They have just about every kind of knife you could think of. They also have kits and parts to make your own. Quality and service are good. Some items are a bit cheesy or of mixed quality (particularly miltary surplus items) but they mention that in the description.

JD - If you want carbon steel why not damascus. They have Damascus steel blanks and complete knives. They also have Norwegian blade blanks that are SS-HighCarbon-SS sandwiches which give you the best of both worlds

J. Dillon
01-26-2001, 09:18 AM
Thanks for all the tips.

I like to make at least one international trip a year. Fixed knives just won't "cut" it. You have to check it in seperate and wait a long time for it to come through on the other end. A Swiss Army knife can be carried aboard with not two much trouble although they take a second look at mine with a cherry handle. In France I had to surrender it at a police station entry to one of the Cathederals.

I guess the answer is to have a travel knife and everyday one at home.

I used the saw on mine while in Egypt to cut down a cane that needed to be trimmed down for a fellow injured Nile Steamer traveler.
It's fun to be a hero. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif

Has any body else had a "adventure" with their knife ?

J. Dillon
01-26-2001, 09:18 AM
Thanks for all the tips.

I like to make at least one international trip a year. Fixed knives just won't "cut" it. You have to check it in seperate and wait a long time for it to come through on the other end. A Swiss Army knife can be carried aboard with not two much trouble although they take a second look at mine with a cherry handle. In France I had to surrender it at a police station entry to one of the Cathederals.

I guess the answer is to have a travel knife and everyday one at home.

I used the saw on mine while in Egypt to cut down a cane that needed to be trimmed down for a fellow injured Nile Steamer traveler.
It's fun to be a hero. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif

Has any body else had a "adventure" with their knife ?

J. Dillon
01-26-2001, 09:18 AM
Thanks for all the tips.

I like to make at least one international trip a year. Fixed knives just won't "cut" it. You have to check it in seperate and wait a long time for it to come through on the other end. A Swiss Army knife can be carried aboard with not two much trouble although they take a second look at mine with a cherry handle. In France I had to surrender it at a police station entry to one of the Cathederals.

I guess the answer is to have a travel knife and everyday one at home.

I used the saw on mine while in Egypt to cut down a cane that needed to be trimmed down for a fellow injured Nile Steamer traveler.
It's fun to be a hero. http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/wink.gif

Has any body else had a "adventure" with their knife ?

Ed Harrow
01-26-2001, 12:29 PM
Geez, don't want to feel like my knives are the only one's with adventures:

~1980, February, I'm on the French Coast awaiting my ride back to the UK. Beside us in the line of vehicles is a VW mircobus (Say it like Arlo) who was shortly to discover that the keys were in the vehicle, and the doors were locked.

They'd actually taken a few swings at a window when http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/cool.gifer heads prevailed. I noted that the vent windows didn't open, meaning they were secured with mere rubber gaskets. I took out my handy knife and, with surgical precision, sliced the gasket, removed the window, reached in and handed them their keys.

Now only one problem, the weather was nasty, cold, rainy, and windy and all that weather was going in that window.

What to do? Reach into the boot and pull out a roll of _____ _____!

Ed Harrow
01-26-2001, 12:29 PM
Geez, don't want to feel like my knives are the only one's with adventures:

~1980, February, I'm on the French Coast awaiting my ride back to the UK. Beside us in the line of vehicles is a VW mircobus (Say it like Arlo) who was shortly to discover that the keys were in the vehicle, and the doors were locked.

They'd actually taken a few swings at a window when http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/cool.gifer heads prevailed. I noted that the vent windows didn't open, meaning they were secured with mere rubber gaskets. I took out my handy knife and, with surgical precision, sliced the gasket, removed the window, reached in and handed them their keys.

Now only one problem, the weather was nasty, cold, rainy, and windy and all that weather was going in that window.

What to do? Reach into the boot and pull out a roll of _____ _____!

Ed Harrow
01-26-2001, 12:29 PM
Geez, don't want to feel like my knives are the only one's with adventures:

~1980, February, I'm on the French Coast awaiting my ride back to the UK. Beside us in the line of vehicles is a VW mircobus (Say it like Arlo) who was shortly to discover that the keys were in the vehicle, and the doors were locked.

They'd actually taken a few swings at a window when http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/cool.gifer heads prevailed. I noted that the vent windows didn't open, meaning they were secured with mere rubber gaskets. I took out my handy knife and, with surgical precision, sliced the gasket, removed the window, reached in and handed them their keys.

Now only one problem, the weather was nasty, cold, rainy, and windy and all that weather was going in that window.

What to do? Reach into the boot and pull out a roll of _____ _____!

Keith Wilson
01-26-2001, 12:40 PM
The best d*** knife I've ever found (no, I'm not opinionated or anything) is made by highly skilled robots at the Erickson plant in Mora, Sweden - Carbon steel, Very hard steel laminated between two layers of softer tougher stuff, costs $7.50, looks like a toy and cuts better than you would believe. I bought a bunch of them and gave them the Christmas to everyone I know who needs that sort of thing: See this link:
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?page=31081&category=1,130,43332,43393&abspage=1&ccurrency=2&SID=

Keith Wilson
01-26-2001, 12:40 PM
The best d*** knife I've ever found (no, I'm not opinionated or anything) is made by highly skilled robots at the Erickson plant in Mora, Sweden - Carbon steel, Very hard steel laminated between two layers of softer tougher stuff, costs $7.50, looks like a toy and cuts better than you would believe. I bought a bunch of them and gave them the Christmas to everyone I know who needs that sort of thing: See this link:
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?page=31081&category=1,130,43332,43393&abspage=1&ccurrency=2&SID=

Keith Wilson
01-26-2001, 12:40 PM
The best d*** knife I've ever found (no, I'm not opinionated or anything) is made by highly skilled robots at the Erickson plant in Mora, Sweden - Carbon steel, Very hard steel laminated between two layers of softer tougher stuff, costs $7.50, looks like a toy and cuts better than you would believe. I bought a bunch of them and gave them the Christmas to everyone I know who needs that sort of thing: See this link:
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?page=31081&category=1,130,43332,43393&abspage=1&ccurrency=2&SID=

Jim H
01-26-2001, 05:27 PM
I called Tx Knife Supply and they said they haven't seen any folders with carbon blades, but that doesn't mean they aren't out there...

On another tack if you can get the blade out, well then a carbon steel bar stock is inexpensive (costs a little more for D2 and a lot more for Damascus) and you can trace the blade on the bar stock, cut it out shape it & drill it.

BTW if you buy ss knives with what is advertised as a "sub zero quench" you'll get a blade that, while harder to sharpen initially, holds an edge a long time and takes all kinds of abuse.

Jim

[This message has been edited by JimH (edited 01-26-2001).]

Jim H
01-26-2001, 05:27 PM
I called Tx Knife Supply and they said they haven't seen any folders with carbon blades, but that doesn't mean they aren't out there...

On another tack if you can get the blade out, well then a carbon steel bar stock is inexpensive (costs a little more for D2 and a lot more for Damascus) and you can trace the blade on the bar stock, cut it out shape it & drill it.

BTW if you buy ss knives with what is advertised as a "sub zero quench" you'll get a blade that, while harder to sharpen initially, holds an edge a long time and takes all kinds of abuse.

Jim

[This message has been edited by JimH (edited 01-26-2001).]

Jim H
01-26-2001, 05:27 PM
I called Tx Knife Supply and they said they haven't seen any folders with carbon blades, but that doesn't mean they aren't out there...

On another tack if you can get the blade out, well then a carbon steel bar stock is inexpensive (costs a little more for D2 and a lot more for Damascus) and you can trace the blade on the bar stock, cut it out shape it & drill it.

BTW if you buy ss knives with what is advertised as a "sub zero quench" you'll get a blade that, while harder to sharpen initially, holds an edge a long time and takes all kinds of abuse.

Jim

[This message has been edited by JimH (edited 01-26-2001).]

T.KAMILA
01-26-2001, 05:48 PM
http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1330151&a=9891760&p=39213440
Just made this one last week. Blade ground from an old high-speed steel planer blade, some rose wood and a piece of bronze. Nice thing about quality high speed steel is you can grind to shape and not worry about re-hardening and tempering. Holds a nice edge also.

Tom

T.KAMILA
01-26-2001, 05:48 PM
http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1330151&a=9891760&p=39213440
Just made this one last week. Blade ground from an old high-speed steel planer blade, some rose wood and a piece of bronze. Nice thing about quality high speed steel is you can grind to shape and not worry about re-hardening and tempering. Holds a nice edge also.

Tom

T.KAMILA
01-26-2001, 05:48 PM
http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1330151&a=9891760&p=39213440
Just made this one last week. Blade ground from an old high-speed steel planer blade, some rose wood and a piece of bronze. Nice thing about quality high speed steel is you can grind to shape and not worry about re-hardening and tempering. Holds a nice edge also.

Tom

paladin
01-26-2001, 06:06 PM
Keith, That sounds like some of the stuff my blades are made of. I have a Randall #2 stilletto that I carried for over 10 years in Vietnam and it doesnt have a nick in the blade, and I have stuck it in some wierd places and strange materials. Also have a Randall Bowie, just like the one in the Smithsonian, only prettier. We lost a tail rotor at about 200 feet up near thuy Hoa and went down on our side. The airframe twisted and we couldn't release the door (one of the few birds that still had the doors on them). I jammed the Bowie between the frame and the door, and an army dude hit the backside of the blade with his M-14 and we sheared the hinge....twice...and the door and us departed. The blade has no nicks...and both knives are high carbon swedish tool steel. I have a former "Buck" knife whose blade has been replaced by a similar custom blade made from the same steel, and it has a small attachement that allows you to open it with one hand or a "flick of the thumb". This is the kind of material you should look for, and it isn't that difficult to make the blade/knife, but could be time consuming.

paladin
01-26-2001, 06:06 PM
Keith, That sounds like some of the stuff my blades are made of. I have a Randall #2 stilletto that I carried for over 10 years in Vietnam and it doesnt have a nick in the blade, and I have stuck it in some wierd places and strange materials. Also have a Randall Bowie, just like the one in the Smithsonian, only prettier. We lost a tail rotor at about 200 feet up near thuy Hoa and went down on our side. The airframe twisted and we couldn't release the door (one of the few birds that still had the doors on them). I jammed the Bowie between the frame and the door, and an army dude hit the backside of the blade with his M-14 and we sheared the hinge....twice...and the door and us departed. The blade has no nicks...and both knives are high carbon swedish tool steel. I have a former "Buck" knife whose blade has been replaced by a similar custom blade made from the same steel, and it has a small attachement that allows you to open it with one hand or a "flick of the thumb". This is the kind of material you should look for, and it isn't that difficult to make the blade/knife, but could be time consuming.

paladin
01-26-2001, 06:06 PM
Keith, That sounds like some of the stuff my blades are made of. I have a Randall #2 stilletto that I carried for over 10 years in Vietnam and it doesnt have a nick in the blade, and I have stuck it in some wierd places and strange materials. Also have a Randall Bowie, just like the one in the Smithsonian, only prettier. We lost a tail rotor at about 200 feet up near thuy Hoa and went down on our side. The airframe twisted and we couldn't release the door (one of the few birds that still had the doors on them). I jammed the Bowie between the frame and the door, and an army dude hit the backside of the blade with his M-14 and we sheared the hinge....twice...and the door and us departed. The blade has no nicks...and both knives are high carbon swedish tool steel. I have a former "Buck" knife whose blade has been replaced by a similar custom blade made from the same steel, and it has a small attachement that allows you to open it with one hand or a "flick of the thumb". This is the kind of material you should look for, and it isn't that difficult to make the blade/knife, but could be time consuming.

Tom Lathrop
01-26-2001, 10:34 PM
Tom, Your knife looks like it could do some serious work around the shop. I like the straight cutting edge. None of the catalogs that I've seen have either finished knives or blanks with straight edges.

Tom Lathrop
01-26-2001, 10:34 PM
Tom, Your knife looks like it could do some serious work around the shop. I like the straight cutting edge. None of the catalogs that I've seen have either finished knives or blanks with straight edges.

Tom Lathrop
01-26-2001, 10:34 PM
Tom, Your knife looks like it could do some serious work around the shop. I like the straight cutting edge. None of the catalogs that I've seen have either finished knives or blanks with straight edges.

Ross Faneuf
01-26-2001, 11:46 PM
I've carried a Swiss Army knife for about 35 years; I'm on maybe my 5th one. I use it all the time for non-serious cutting; opening packages, a bit of cheese etc etc. I use the scissors a good deal, the corkscrew and bottle opener occasionally. Also both the toothpick and tweezers. I also fidget with it, flicking the blades open and closed with my thumb, so i don't mind if it isn't extra sharp. For some reason, people in meetings find this intimidating.

I use a variety of knives in the shop. Use a Stanley contractor's knife a lot, especially for cutting tape and trimming green fiberglass. I always have one or two utility knife blades kicking around which are good for fine tape trimming and such. I've got a real nice utility knife with a rosewood handle and a dinky little 1" blade which takes a real good edge that I use for marking, carving, and like that. And a custom boat knife a friend made out of some kind of special knife blank with two grades of stainless; the one forming the edge takes a very good edge, but I use this only on the boat.

Ross Faneuf
01-26-2001, 11:46 PM
I've carried a Swiss Army knife for about 35 years; I'm on maybe my 5th one. I use it all the time for non-serious cutting; opening packages, a bit of cheese etc etc. I use the scissors a good deal, the corkscrew and bottle opener occasionally. Also both the toothpick and tweezers. I also fidget with it, flicking the blades open and closed with my thumb, so i don't mind if it isn't extra sharp. For some reason, people in meetings find this intimidating.

I use a variety of knives in the shop. Use a Stanley contractor's knife a lot, especially for cutting tape and trimming green fiberglass. I always have one or two utility knife blades kicking around which are good for fine tape trimming and such. I've got a real nice utility knife with a rosewood handle and a dinky little 1" blade which takes a real good edge that I use for marking, carving, and like that. And a custom boat knife a friend made out of some kind of special knife blank with two grades of stainless; the one forming the edge takes a very good edge, but I use this only on the boat.

Ross Faneuf
01-26-2001, 11:46 PM
I've carried a Swiss Army knife for about 35 years; I'm on maybe my 5th one. I use it all the time for non-serious cutting; opening packages, a bit of cheese etc etc. I use the scissors a good deal, the corkscrew and bottle opener occasionally. Also both the toothpick and tweezers. I also fidget with it, flicking the blades open and closed with my thumb, so i don't mind if it isn't extra sharp. For some reason, people in meetings find this intimidating.

I use a variety of knives in the shop. Use a Stanley contractor's knife a lot, especially for cutting tape and trimming green fiberglass. I always have one or two utility knife blades kicking around which are good for fine tape trimming and such. I've got a real nice utility knife with a rosewood handle and a dinky little 1" blade which takes a real good edge that I use for marking, carving, and like that. And a custom boat knife a friend made out of some kind of special knife blank with two grades of stainless; the one forming the edge takes a very good edge, but I use this only on the boat.

Bryan Mehus
01-27-2001, 04:06 AM
T.K., nice looking knife. I use a similar knife, made by Klein Tools, for skin'n cables. It has a longer handle for leverage, but the same straight edged blade, comes with a leather sheath and a good pair of short scissors. BTW I see hundreds of planer knives go in the recycle bin, and make all kinds of scrapers out of them. Most of them are from Sheffield.

Bryan Mehus
01-27-2001, 04:06 AM
T.K., nice looking knife. I use a similar knife, made by Klein Tools, for skin'n cables. It has a longer handle for leverage, but the same straight edged blade, comes with a leather sheath and a good pair of short scissors. BTW I see hundreds of planer knives go in the recycle bin, and make all kinds of scrapers out of them. Most of them are from Sheffield.

Bryan Mehus
01-27-2001, 04:06 AM
T.K., nice looking knife. I use a similar knife, made by Klein Tools, for skin'n cables. It has a longer handle for leverage, but the same straight edged blade, comes with a leather sheath and a good pair of short scissors. BTW I see hundreds of planer knives go in the recycle bin, and make all kinds of scrapers out of them. Most of them are from Sheffield.

T.KAMILA
01-27-2001, 05:03 AM
Nice thing about high-speed steel is you can grind it red hot and it doesnít loose its temper. Developed to remove lots of steel at high temps in machine shops. Woodturners use it for that reason. Sharpening all the time and no need to worry about loosing the edge and its very abrasion resistance. Wood is a very abrasive material to machine. The metal used in quality planer blades has an impressive ability to hold an edge.
So, get an old planer blade about to be discarded, grind to your hearts content, glue on a handle and you got a nice knife. A tip my father taught me is to grind an edge on a standard carbide masonry bit and drill holes in the stuff for your lanyard. No you donít need a diamond stone to do that. A regular stone on your grinder will work though you will need to re-dress the wheel afterwards. Some work without a re-grind.
Just one more reason to take that dive into the dumpster.

Tom

T.KAMILA
01-27-2001, 05:03 AM
Nice thing about high-speed steel is you can grind it red hot and it doesnít loose its temper. Developed to remove lots of steel at high temps in machine shops. Woodturners use it for that reason. Sharpening all the time and no need to worry about loosing the edge and its very abrasion resistance. Wood is a very abrasive material to machine. The metal used in quality planer blades has an impressive ability to hold an edge.
So, get an old planer blade about to be discarded, grind to your hearts content, glue on a handle and you got a nice knife. A tip my father taught me is to grind an edge on a standard carbide masonry bit and drill holes in the stuff for your lanyard. No you donít need a diamond stone to do that. A regular stone on your grinder will work though you will need to re-dress the wheel afterwards. Some work without a re-grind.
Just one more reason to take that dive into the dumpster.

Tom

T.KAMILA
01-27-2001, 05:03 AM
Nice thing about high-speed steel is you can grind it red hot and it doesnít loose its temper. Developed to remove lots of steel at high temps in machine shops. Woodturners use it for that reason. Sharpening all the time and no need to worry about loosing the edge and its very abrasion resistance. Wood is a very abrasive material to machine. The metal used in quality planer blades has an impressive ability to hold an edge.
So, get an old planer blade about to be discarded, grind to your hearts content, glue on a handle and you got a nice knife. A tip my father taught me is to grind an edge on a standard carbide masonry bit and drill holes in the stuff for your lanyard. No you donít need a diamond stone to do that. A regular stone on your grinder will work though you will need to re-dress the wheel afterwards. Some work without a re-grind.
Just one more reason to take that dive into the dumpster.

Tom

Ron Williamson
01-27-2001, 06:46 AM
I also carry a Buck 303.I am disapointed with its ability to keep an edge, since the two Schrade Old Timers that I had carried before were great.They were carbon steel where the Buck is stainless.
I like the large blade sort of sharp,for pencils or scraping and such.The medium blade is very sharp for carving and cleaning up where other tools are too large.The smallest blade is kept SCARY sharp for splinter surgery.

Ron Williamson
01-27-2001, 06:46 AM
I also carry a Buck 303.I am disapointed with its ability to keep an edge, since the two Schrade Old Timers that I had carried before were great.They were carbon steel where the Buck is stainless.
I like the large blade sort of sharp,for pencils or scraping and such.The medium blade is very sharp for carving and cleaning up where other tools are too large.The smallest blade is kept SCARY sharp for splinter surgery.

Ron Williamson
01-27-2001, 06:46 AM
I also carry a Buck 303.I am disapointed with its ability to keep an edge, since the two Schrade Old Timers that I had carried before were great.They were carbon steel where the Buck is stainless.
I like the large blade sort of sharp,for pencils or scraping and such.The medium blade is very sharp for carving and cleaning up where other tools are too large.The smallest blade is kept SCARY sharp for splinter surgery.

Kermit
01-27-2001, 01:50 PM
Who was it thought up these stainless blades? I have a couple of Swissarmyknives and a Swisstool, but they are strictly convenience tools for picnics and such. Serious knives need real steel. Sloyd knives are great in the shop--on the hip and always open. I also use NW native-style crooked knives in the shop. I have three knives and an native-style adz by Kestrel from over on Lopez Island. Greg makes great knives.

Kermit
01-27-2001, 01:50 PM
Who was it thought up these stainless blades? I have a couple of Swissarmyknives and a Swisstool, but they are strictly convenience tools for picnics and such. Serious knives need real steel. Sloyd knives are great in the shop--on the hip and always open. I also use NW native-style crooked knives in the shop. I have three knives and an native-style adz by Kestrel from over on Lopez Island. Greg makes great knives.

Kermit
01-27-2001, 01:50 PM
Who was it thought up these stainless blades? I have a couple of Swissarmyknives and a Swisstool, but they are strictly convenience tools for picnics and such. Serious knives need real steel. Sloyd knives are great in the shop--on the hip and always open. I also use NW native-style crooked knives in the shop. I have three knives and an native-style adz by Kestrel from over on Lopez Island. Greg makes great knives.

NormMessinger
01-27-2001, 02:08 PM
So, how do you make your SS knife blade scary sharp?

--Norm

NormMessinger
01-27-2001, 02:08 PM
So, how do you make your SS knife blade scary sharp?

--Norm

NormMessinger
01-27-2001, 02:08 PM
So, how do you make your SS knife blade scary sharp?

--Norm

paladin
01-27-2001, 02:57 PM
You wanna knife scary sharp....work the edge down with a fine Arkansas stone, and the finish with jewelers rouge and a piece of oak tanned leather. You know it's sharp when you can hold a piece of 20 pound typing paper between your thumb and forefinger and slice it into two sheets.

paladin
01-27-2001, 02:57 PM
You wanna knife scary sharp....work the edge down with a fine Arkansas stone, and the finish with jewelers rouge and a piece of oak tanned leather. You know it's sharp when you can hold a piece of 20 pound typing paper between your thumb and forefinger and slice it into two sheets.

paladin
01-27-2001, 02:57 PM
You wanna knife scary sharp....work the edge down with a fine Arkansas stone, and the finish with jewelers rouge and a piece of oak tanned leather. You know it's sharp when you can hold a piece of 20 pound typing paper between your thumb and forefinger and slice it into two sheets.

Wayne Jeffers
01-27-2001, 11:05 PM
Norm -- I always found it easy enough to PUT a really good edge on my Buck 303 with an Arkansas stone and gun oil. Like Ron says, it didn't HOLD an edge too long. I tried to keep it pretty sharp most of the time (especially the "splinter remover" blade), which explains why the blades were worn back so thin.

Wayne

Wayne Jeffers
01-27-2001, 11:05 PM
Norm -- I always found it easy enough to PUT a really good edge on my Buck 303 with an Arkansas stone and gun oil. Like Ron says, it didn't HOLD an edge too long. I tried to keep it pretty sharp most of the time (especially the "splinter remover" blade), which explains why the blades were worn back so thin.

Wayne

Wayne Jeffers
01-27-2001, 11:05 PM
Norm -- I always found it easy enough to PUT a really good edge on my Buck 303 with an Arkansas stone and gun oil. Like Ron says, it didn't HOLD an edge too long. I tried to keep it pretty sharp most of the time (especially the "splinter remover" blade), which explains why the blades were worn back so thin.

Wayne

Art Read
01-28-2001, 02:54 PM
Hey, Kermit... Never heard of Kestral on Lopez. They in walking distance of the anchorages in Fisherman or Upright Bays?

Art Read
01-28-2001, 02:54 PM
Hey, Kermit... Never heard of Kestral on Lopez. They in walking distance of the anchorages in Fisherman or Upright Bays?

Art Read
01-28-2001, 02:54 PM
Hey, Kermit... Never heard of Kestral on Lopez. They in walking distance of the anchorages in Fisherman or Upright Bays?

Kermit
01-29-2001, 10:56 PM
Hi, Art. Here's a website for Kestrel Tool:

http://www.sculpturetools.com/kestrel/

The snailmail address is rural, so who knows where they are on the island. Fellas name is Gregg (not a typo) Blomberg, at Rt. 1, Box 1762, Lopez, WA 98261

He makes several sizes and styles of NW native adzes, crooked knives of various profiles and sizes, as well as straight knives. As I said, I have several. I bought mine as kits, but they can be had as finished knives or you can just buy the blades and do the wood thing yourself. An artist/carver friend did that with Pacific Yew (taxis brevifolia--hey, it's the only Latin name I know) for handles. Beautiful. I have found Gregg's steel to be of the absolute finest quality anywhere. Serious tools! Real basic woodworking.

Get yourself an old-growth western red cedar and whittle out a war canoe. We'll all show up to roll it over and fill it with saltchuck and hot rocks for the bending! A REAL woodenboat.

Kermit
01-29-2001, 10:56 PM
Hi, Art. Here's a website for Kestrel Tool:

http://www.sculpturetools.com/kestrel/

The snailmail address is rural, so who knows where they are on the island. Fellas name is Gregg (not a typo) Blomberg, at Rt. 1, Box 1762, Lopez, WA 98261

He makes several sizes and styles of NW native adzes, crooked knives of various profiles and sizes, as well as straight knives. As I said, I have several. I bought mine as kits, but they can be had as finished knives or you can just buy the blades and do the wood thing yourself. An artist/carver friend did that with Pacific Yew (taxis brevifolia--hey, it's the only Latin name I know) for handles. Beautiful. I have found Gregg's steel to be of the absolute finest quality anywhere. Serious tools! Real basic woodworking.

Get yourself an old-growth western red cedar and whittle out a war canoe. We'll all show up to roll it over and fill it with saltchuck and hot rocks for the bending! A REAL woodenboat.

Kermit
01-29-2001, 10:56 PM
Hi, Art. Here's a website for Kestrel Tool:

http://www.sculpturetools.com/kestrel/

The snailmail address is rural, so who knows where they are on the island. Fellas name is Gregg (not a typo) Blomberg, at Rt. 1, Box 1762, Lopez, WA 98261

He makes several sizes and styles of NW native adzes, crooked knives of various profiles and sizes, as well as straight knives. As I said, I have several. I bought mine as kits, but they can be had as finished knives or you can just buy the blades and do the wood thing yourself. An artist/carver friend did that with Pacific Yew (taxis brevifolia--hey, it's the only Latin name I know) for handles. Beautiful. I have found Gregg's steel to be of the absolute finest quality anywhere. Serious tools! Real basic woodworking.

Get yourself an old-growth western red cedar and whittle out a war canoe. We'll all show up to roll it over and fill it with saltchuck and hot rocks for the bending! A REAL woodenboat.

StevenBauer
02-11-2001, 02:17 PM
I saw some beautiful handmade knives at the Maine Boatbuilders Show last March.
They were made by Mudd Sharrigan, he also made marline spikes and other rigger's gear.
He has no web-site but his number is 207-882-9820.

StevenBauer
02-11-2001, 02:17 PM
I saw some beautiful handmade knives at the Maine Boatbuilders Show last March.
They were made by Mudd Sharrigan, he also made marline spikes and other rigger's gear.
He has no web-site but his number is 207-882-9820.

StevenBauer
02-11-2001, 02:17 PM
I saw some beautiful handmade knives at the Maine Boatbuilders Show last March.
They were made by Mudd Sharrigan, he also made marline spikes and other rigger's gear.
He has no web-site but his number is 207-882-9820.

Ed Harrow
02-11-2001, 10:40 PM
The output cable for my laptops charger shorted out Fri night. No Dell chargers close at hand, so called office to Fed-X me a replacement. Meanwhile, used my trusty pocket knife to remove the strain relief (the failure, of course, was just beyond it), removed all the jacket, separated the coaxial from the cracked insulating layer, used a bit of scotch tape, and presto I'm live again (But it ain't pretty).

Ed Harrow
02-11-2001, 10:40 PM
The output cable for my laptops charger shorted out Fri night. No Dell chargers close at hand, so called office to Fed-X me a replacement. Meanwhile, used my trusty pocket knife to remove the strain relief (the failure, of course, was just beyond it), removed all the jacket, separated the coaxial from the cracked insulating layer, used a bit of scotch tape, and presto I'm live again (But it ain't pretty).

Ed Harrow
02-11-2001, 10:40 PM
The output cable for my laptops charger shorted out Fri night. No Dell chargers close at hand, so called office to Fed-X me a replacement. Meanwhile, used my trusty pocket knife to remove the strain relief (the failure, of course, was just beyond it), removed all the jacket, separated the coaxial from the cracked insulating layer, used a bit of scotch tape, and presto I'm live again (But it ain't pretty).

NormMessinger
02-12-2001, 11:04 AM
Desperate times call for desperate measures.

But you didn't say what brand pocket knife.

--Norm

NormMessinger
02-12-2001, 11:04 AM
Desperate times call for desperate measures.

But you didn't say what brand pocket knife.

--Norm

NormMessinger
02-12-2001, 11:04 AM
Desperate times call for desperate measures.

But you didn't say what brand pocket knife.

--Norm

Ed Harrow
02-13-2001, 04:45 AM
Single, locking blade, LL Bean. 25+ years old. Wish the lock worked better, but at least it's not (yet) closed on my fingers.

Ed Harrow
02-13-2001, 04:45 AM
Single, locking blade, LL Bean. 25+ years old. Wish the lock worked better, but at least it's not (yet) closed on my fingers.

Ed Harrow
02-13-2001, 04:45 AM
Single, locking blade, LL Bean. 25+ years old. Wish the lock worked better, but at least it's not (yet) closed on my fingers.

Art Read
02-13-2001, 09:06 AM
Love it Ed! I bet heads are are shaking all over Japan... I once used a bit of speaker wire to jury rig an expansion card in a desktop system I hobbled together. One of the gold leads on the slot had been worn away. I just layed the wire in to close the gap and slid the card in on top. Saved buying a new motherboard. (BTW, I used a cheap, dull "rigging" knife to strip the insulation...)

Art Read
02-13-2001, 09:06 AM
Love it Ed! I bet heads are are shaking all over Japan... I once used a bit of speaker wire to jury rig an expansion card in a desktop system I hobbled together. One of the gold leads on the slot had been worn away. I just layed the wire in to close the gap and slid the card in on top. Saved buying a new motherboard. (BTW, I used a cheap, dull "rigging" knife to strip the insulation...)

Art Read
02-13-2001, 09:06 AM
Love it Ed! I bet heads are are shaking all over Japan... I once used a bit of speaker wire to jury rig an expansion card in a desktop system I hobbled together. One of the gold leads on the slot had been worn away. I just layed the wire in to close the gap and slid the card in on top. Saved buying a new motherboard. (BTW, I used a cheap, dull "rigging" knife to strip the insulation...)

Mike Field
02-13-2001, 07:39 PM
I've got a knife much like the one in Tom's picture. (Can't think of the brand off-hand -- Currie? -- but it's English.) Came in a leather pouch along with a marlinespike, from one of those yottie shops. Takes an edge well, and holds it quite well, despite being stainless. The sheepsfoot end is really useful for canvas- and rope-work -- gets right into corners. I think they call it a sailmaker's knife.

The marlinespike that came in the kit is useful occsionally, too, but not as much as a Swedish fid. And I've seen the same sort of kit with a small pair of pliers added, as well -- useful when whipping or seizing.

But by far my best knife is one of a pair of kitchen knives from the US. High-quality steel, takes and holds a beautiful edge, hickory handles, bronze rivets. "Tru-Edge" brand, made by The Ontario Knife Company. (Yes, I know, but it says USA on the blade.) I had two, different blade shapes. Because they rusted if not cared for, my wife (SWMNOM) didn't value them at all and used to use them for any old thing, including gardening, until I caught her at it. She finally lost one of them -- I'm sure it's buried under a pile of garden junk somewhere, rusting away to nothing -- but she doesn't DARE touch the other one now!

I've got to hand it to you Americans -- you know how to make some good tools.

[This message has been edited by Mike Field (edited 02-15-2001).]

Mike Field
02-13-2001, 07:39 PM
I've got a knife much like the one in Tom's picture. (Can't think of the brand off-hand -- Currie? -- but it's English.) Came in a leather pouch along with a marlinespike, from one of those yottie shops. Takes an edge well, and holds it quite well, despite being stainless. The sheepsfoot end is really useful for canvas- and rope-work -- gets right into corners. I think they call it a sailmaker's knife.

The marlinespike that came in the kit is useful occsionally, too, but not as much as a Swedish fid. And I've seen the same sort of kit with a small pair of pliers added, as well -- useful when whipping or seizing.

But by far my best knife is one of a pair of kitchen knives from the US. High-quality steel, takes and holds a beautiful edge, hickory handles, bronze rivets. "Tru-Edge" brand, made by The Ontario Knife Company. (Yes, I know, but it says USA on the blade.) I had two, different blade shapes. Because they rusted if not cared for, my wife (SWMNOM) didn't value them at all and used to use them for any old thing, including gardening, until I caught her at it. She finally lost one of them -- I'm sure it's buried under a pile of garden junk somewhere, rusting away to nothing -- but she doesn't DARE touch the other one now!

I've got to hand it to you Americans -- you know how to make some good tools.

[This message has been edited by Mike Field (edited 02-15-2001).]

Mike Field
02-13-2001, 07:39 PM
I've got a knife much like the one in Tom's picture. (Can't think of the brand off-hand -- Currie? -- but it's English.) Came in a leather pouch along with a marlinespike, from one of those yottie shops. Takes an edge well, and holds it quite well, despite being stainless. The sheepsfoot end is really useful for canvas- and rope-work -- gets right into corners. I think they call it a sailmaker's knife.

The marlinespike that came in the kit is useful occsionally, too, but not as much as a Swedish fid. And I've seen the same sort of kit with a small pair of pliers added, as well -- useful when whipping or seizing.

But by far my best knife is one of a pair of kitchen knives from the US. High-quality steel, takes and holds a beautiful edge, hickory handles, bronze rivets. "Tru-Edge" brand, made by The Ontario Knife Company. (Yes, I know, but it says USA on the blade.) I had two, different blade shapes. Because they rusted if not cared for, my wife (SWMNOM) didn't value them at all and used to use them for any old thing, including gardening, until I caught her at it. She finally lost one of them -- I'm sure it's buried under a pile of garden junk somewhere, rusting away to nothing -- but she doesn't DARE touch the other one now!

I've got to hand it to you Americans -- you know how to make some good tools.

[This message has been edited by Mike Field (edited 02-15-2001).]